Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Group items tagged pedagogy collaboration

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Nigel Coutts

Towards a pedagogy for life-worthy learning - The Learner's Way - 14 views

  •  
    In the contemporary classroom, there is much greater consideration of what the learner does in partnership with their teacher so that they develop the capacity to learn. Classroom routines and structures are designed to engage the learner in a rich process of dialogical learning. 
Duncan Cole

Team-Based Learning Collaborative - 28 views

  •  
    This looks like a really great approach to small group work - I'd be interested to know what experience others have of using it.
Roland Gesthuizen

▶ Collaboration Strategies in the Classroom - YouTube - 80 views

  •  
    "This video explores the concept of collaboration, both ideologically and strategically. It provides some observations of the way a teacher may integrate collaboration into the classroom. Thanks to technology we are now able to collaborate on a global level. This offers new opportunities for the classroom. It is a teachers role in the 21st to empower their students with the literacy of collaboration."
Misha Miller

Using Groups Effectively: 10 Principles » Edurati Review - 50 views

  •  
    "Conversation is key . Sawyer succinctly explains this principle: "Conversation leads to flow, and flow leads to creativity." When having students work in groups, consider what will spark rich conversation. The original researcher on flow, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, found that rich conversation precedes and ignites flow more than any other activity.1 Tasks that require (or force) interaction lead to richer collaborative conceptualization. Set a clear but open-ended goal . Groups produce the richest ideas when they have a goal that will focus their interaction but also has fluid enough boundaries to allow for creativity. This is a challenge we often overlook. As teachers, we often have an idea of what a group's final product should look like (or sound like, or…). If we put students into groups to produce a predetermined outcome, we prevent creative thinking from finding an entry point. Try not announcing time limits. As teachers we often use a time limit as a "motivator" that we hope will keep group work focused. In reality, this may be a major detractor from quality group work. Deadlines, according to Sawyer, tend to impede flow and produce lower quality results. Groups produce their best work in low-pressure situations. Without a need to "keep one eye on the clock," the group's focus can be fully given to the task. Do not appoint a group "leader." In research studies, supervisors, or group leaders, tend to subvert flow unless they participate as an equal, listening and allowing the group's thoughts and decisions to guide the interaction. Keep it small. Groups with the minimum number of members that are needed to accomplish a task are more efficient and effective. Consider weaving together individual and group work. For additive tasks-tasks in whicha group is expectedtoproduce a list, adding one idea to another-research suggests that better results develop
Glenn Hervieux

My ETMOOC Intro: Creating Great Things Through Collaboration - YouTube - 44 views

  •  
    Excellent use of public domain video clips and voiceover to communicate "Creating Great Things Through Collaboration". Part of the #ETMOOC course I'm involved in. 
Dimitris Tzouris

Faculty and IT: Conversations and Collaboration (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE - 20 views

  • IT staff should participate in academic planning to develop course projects and institution-wide outcomes, and faculty should sit on technology committees to develop shared goals and values with IT staff.
  • Only with the insight this provides can IT staff propose systemic technological solutions that meet the specific needs, as well as the broader academic objectives, of faculty.
  • faculty need to know how students learn with technology and what students can create or do because of it.3
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • faculty need technology that helps them to be better professors and that helps students become more sophisticated learners.
  • In the spirit of building relationships and sharing knowledge, IT staff could sit in classes to observe the teaching and learning process and to see how technology is — or could be — used. Faculty could attend academic technology conferences alongside IT staff. And when a technology solution is warranted, IT staff could provide faculty with a vetted set of instructional technology tools to explore and choose from. In return, faculty can invest in becoming tech-savvy enough to assess, and ultimately use, those tools. Faculty won't be blindly "window shopping" for technology tools, and IT staff won't be proposing solutions in a vacuum; instead, they will be sharing in goals and challenges.
  • the most effective collaborations come from a common sense of purpose and goals.
  • Faculty can start by identifying specific teaching and learning challenges they are trying to resolve, as individuals and as a faculty body, and can then challenge themselves and IT staff to find creative ways to solve them.
Ed Webb

Paperless Tiger « buckenglish - 0 views

  • Does this jettisoning of time-honored titles mean that the paperless classroom is also lacking a creator, controller and grader?  Is the paperless classroom also a teacherless paradigm?  The answer is in some regards, yes.  I have removed myself from center stage.  I have relinquished the need to control every class.  I have stopped seeing work as stagnant…completed and submitted by students and then graded by me.  I have let go of my need to pre-plan months at a time, in favor of following the path that unfolds as we learn together.  My classes are not, however, teacherless, just less about the teaching and more about the learning.  The students know that I am ready and willing to be student to their insights, that they can teach, create, control and even evaluate their own learning.
  • In the absence of my control, the students have many choices to make
  • Teachers often say that modern students are lazy.  I have long felt that as the shifting winds of technology began to gain force, we teachers were the ones who were unwilling to do the work of rethinking our roles and meeting the students were they were learning already.  Rethinking paper as the primary tool of class is a step in the right direction because it forces a rethinking of the how and why of teaching and learning.
John Evans

21st Century Pedagogy | 21st Century Connections - 1 views

  • How we teach must reflect how our students learn. It must also reflect the world our students will move into. This is a world which is rapidly changing, connected, adapting and evolving. Our style and approach to teaching must emphasise the learning in the 21st century.
    • John McMillen
       
      One paragraph, very simple and staright forward but very powerful.
    • John Evans
       
      Absolutely. I think most teachers are doing a good job with sentence one. It's the second statement that we need to attend to!
1 - 9 of 9
Showing 20 items per page