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Brianna Crowley

Response: Several Ways Teachers & Parents Can Start The New Year Well -- Part Two - Cla... - 52 views

  • With so much talking and not much doing many students would tell teachers that this is a sure-fire way to put them to sleep. Missing out on a golden opportunity when students are most receptive to learning.
  • Instead of taking three weeks to go over what they've already learned, start off with something new. Something that will grab their attention and say "Hey, this is going to be a wonderful learning place for the next 10 months. Get ready."
Glenda Baker

Back to School: 42 Digital Resources for Students & Parents - 188 views

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    inspiration to share 
Holly Gerla

Helpful bullying and cyberbullying model policies and resources from Washington State - 45 views

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    Generation YES Blog
Josh Flores

TODAYMoms - Should parents be blamed when kids fail at school? - 106 views

    • Josh Flores
       
      Who the heck would click "NO"???
    • Josh Flores
       
      Parents should be held accountable, teachers should be held accountable AND students should be held accountable.
    • Josh Flores
       
      from Lynn Jones (to me?) "How many children do you have? I am an educator and I have 6 children who are all different. My second child, a son, was never told to study, never had a spelling word called out to him, and strieved to make all A's and B's since the 2nd grade. His older brother with an IQ of 128 in the 5th grade didn't care about grades and passing. His younger brother almost graduated high school before him even though they were 3 years apart in age. The oldest son has ADHD. His grandmother was a math teacher and I am a math teacher, but yet that was the subject he failed almost each year and had to go to summer school. He had the same parents and the same environment as his younger brother, but he was lacking the drive that is born in you. I won't go into the differences of the other 4 just to say that the good Lord gifted me with 3 ADHD children when not much was known about it (the oldest is 44). Every child is different and parents must learn not to judge one by the others, just like teachers must not assume that about siblings they teach. A parent can be their to help and try to point them in the right direction with the right work ethics in school, but the bottom line is how much the child cares and wants to achieve. The envolved parent can help the child that sits on the fence and can go on either side, but the ultimate choice is going to be the child's. It is the same with church. You can take the child to church every Sunday, but when they get older it is their decision how to direct their life. I am not saying that a parent shouldn't try every day to give the guidance their children need and deserve, but you can't beat yourself up when things don't go the way you think they should. All a parent can do is standby their child and give them all the love they can and to know that sometimes that is not enough for the child."
    • Josh Flores
       
      My Reply to Lynn Jones: 1. Parents should be held accountable along with teachers and the students themselves. 2. Six kids????? You are a saint! I plan on having two at the most and pray to the gods they're not girls! 3. Is there a specific reason you sent me your family history?
    • Josh Flores
       
      From Lynn: "I sent you the history to show that no two children are alike and not to judge one child by the behavior of another. In education we teach all types and there is no one way to approach all children. Sometimes it is not the parent that can make a difference, but someone else and not always a teacher."
    • Josh Flores
       
      I don't think the article is about differentiation but sure, I'm confident it's in the back of any high quality educator's mind. Regardless, we can always do more than standby our kids. 
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    How many children do you have? I am an educator and I have 6 children who are all different. My second child, a son, was never told to study, never had a spelling word called out to him, and strieved to make all A's and B's since the 2nd grade. His older brother with an IQ of 128 in the 5th grade didn't care about grades and passing. His younger brother almost graduated high school before him even though they were 3 years apart in age. The oldest son has ADHD. His grandmother was a math teacher and I am a math teacher, but yet that was the subject he failed almost each year and had to go to summer school. He had the same parents and the same environment as his younger brother, but he was lacking the drive that is born in you. I won't go into the differences of the other 4 just to say that the good Lord gifted me with 3 ADHD children when not much was known about it (the oldest is 44). Every child is different and parents must learn not to judge one by the others, just like teachers must not assume that about siblings they teach. A parent can be their to help and try to point them in the right direction with the right work ethics in school, but the bottom line is how much the child cares and wants to achieve. The envolved parent can help the child that sits on the fence and can go on either side, but the ultimate choice is going to be the child's. It is the same with church. You can take the child to church every Sunday, but when they get older it is their decision how to direct their life. I am not saying that a parent shouldn't try every day to give the guidance their children need and deserve, but you can't beat yourself up when things don't go the way you think they should. All a parent can do is standby their child and give them all the love they can and to know that sometimes that is not enough for the child.
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    I sent you the history to show that no two children are alike and not to judge one child by the behavior of another. In education we teach all types and there is no one way to approach all children. Sometimes it is not the parent that can make a difference, but someone else and not always a teacher.
Holly Gerla

Around the Corner-MGuhlin.org: Parent Summit Presentation - CyberSafety and Digital Cit... - 44 views

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    Fabulous, comprehensive presentation to parents on CyberSafety and Digital Citizenship, shared by Miguel Guhlin.
Steve C

The Bully Project - 94 views

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    Great list of resources available here.
Jeff Suarez Grant

Teach Parents Tech - 94 views

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    Really quick clips on the things parents should but don't always actually know how to do w/ a computer.
Steve C

Parents Toolkit: Resources - 35 views

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    Benjamin Scullard rand_scullard@verizon.net (an underline between rand & scullard) maryellen.scullard@verizon.net Yahya Abdul-Basser taha.abdulbasser@gmail.com ummyahya@hotmail.com Kelvin Fernandez ana-polanco@hotmail.com Terell Long charlene8506@msn.com Brayan Lozano (Mom promised to give the family's email address to me today) The following resources offer material you can use to become more informed about learning differences. They encompass a broad range of viewpoints and approaches to the issues. The list is compiled from books, Web sites, and multimedia that we consulted during the production of this Web site, or that our advisors recommended. Further guidance about how to find resources in your community is offered below.
Bill Graziadei, Ph.D. (aka Dr. G)

Awesome Library - 1 views

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    Awesome Library organizes 36,000 carefully reviewed resources, including the top 5 percent for teachers, students, parents, and librarians. It includes a search engine.
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