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mrtomak

Duolingo: Home - 49 views

shared by mrtomak on 12 Apr 14 - No Cached
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    Duolingo is an intuitive, fun way to learn languages! It contains a variety of activities for both audio and visual learning. It's easy to incorporate this free, cloud-based program into your daily routine.
Joe Canata

Math websites - 158 views

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    Check out these 9 great math based websites.
Andrew McCluskey

Students' happiness at school goes a long way in learning | Springfield News-Leader | n... - 32 views

    • Matt Renwick
       
      To be a valued member of a classroom, they need to have a purpose.
Matt Renwick

What is PBL? | Project Based Learning | BIE - 55 views

shared by Matt Renwick on 29 May 13 - Cached
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    PBL graphic
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    Great graphic depicting elements for rigorous PBL.
C CIA

TeachThought - Learn better. - 45 views

shared by C CIA on 24 May 13 - No Cached
drodarte11

Archer.indb - 53 views

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    examples of explicit instruction
Enid Baines

Don't Confuse Technology With Teaching - Commentary - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 108 views

  • Education is not the transmission of information or ideas. Education is the training needed to make use of information and idea
  • We provide individualized instruction in how to evaluate and make use of information and ideas, teaching people how to think for themselves.
  • A set of podcasts is the 21st-century equivalent of a textbook, not the 21st-century equivalent of a teacher
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  • Technology can make education bette
  • We will, instead, produce graduates who cast assumptions they've never really questioned into grammatically correct slogans, and the sloganeers with the catchiest phrases, the most confidence, and the most money will shape the future.
  • Education is not the transmission of information or ideas. Education is the training needed to make use of information and ideas.
Maureen Greenbaum

Thinking - Why I'm taking full responsibility for my education - 8 views

  • High school isn’t an inspiring place. Not because of the students, but because of the credentialing process. Most schoolwork is for the sake of completion and rote learning.
  • Why should students do more than asked when their education isn’t their responsibility?
  • Good teachers actively demonstrate why what they’re teaching is interesting/useful/insightful.
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  • Good teachers don’t let the credentialing process get in the way of the students learning.
  • Bad teachers assign work merely to assess the student’s ability to complete it in a structured, timely fashion.
  • I don’t care about a piece of paper saying I’m awesome. I care about being awesome.
Bradley Robertson

instaGrok.com - 139 views

shared by Bradley Robertson on 04 Apr 12 - No Cached
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    An innovative search engine built for education. Search via concept map, save searches in a personal journal. Great concept to check out. 
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    Search engine built for education.
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    Diigo and Wolfram Alpha make a love child!
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    Filtered search engine that presents related terms in a web + displays results for web sites, pictures, and some key facts on the right side of the page. Suggested by Jeremy Carver, 5/7/2012; **** NOTE: as of 5/7/2012 this site claims not to work in Internet Explorer ****
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    Wow! I had a hard time pulling myself away. I'd like to experiment more with this tool. Thanks for sharing it.
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    "To understand thoroughly and intuitively" - A search tool that show the inter-relatedness of a topic and allows users to graphically see the information relations.
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    Research any topic with an interactive concept map, that you can customize and share. Free personal and low cost educational accounts.
mdause

Using Diigo in the Classroom - Student Learning with Diigo - 65 views

  • Save important websites and access them on any computer. Categorize websites by titles, notes, keyword tags, lists and groups. Search through bookmarks to quickly find desired information. Save a screenshot of a website and see how it has changed over time. Annotate websites with highlighting or virtual "sticky notes." View any annotations made by others on any website visited. Share websites with g
  • Bookmark Lists
  • Extended Learning
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  • Personal Student Bookmarks
  • Diigo can provide a way to enrich or extend learning about a topic.
  • Beyond extended student learning, Diigo can be used as a form of professional development.
  • Research  Teaching students to research is a common standard across all grade levels, elementary, middle school, high school, and beyond. Diigo excels as a research tool: Students can save relevant websites to lists in their Diigo student accounts. Each saved bookmark captures the URL and a screenshot, and can be searched later. Students can highlight important information right on the website, using Diigo. Later, when students return to the website, they find the reason they saved the bookmark in the first place. Students can use virtual sticky notes to summarize the important points of information from the website. This activity will mimic the time-tested procedure of using note cards to summarize and organize research projects. Students working on similar topics can create and join groups in order to collaborate. Later, when students need to document their sources, Diigo can be used to recall website URLs for citing sources.
    • mdause
       
      How in the WORLD do I do the social part of it?? This seems useful, but I'm still trying to figure out how to let the kids collaborate on Outliners and then share the Outliners with me easily. I bet there's something huge that I'm missing here...
ivan alba

WatchKnowLearn - Videos educativos gratuitos para estudiantes de nivel preescolar, prim... - 9 views

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    Free K-12 educational videos … organized. Tens of thousands of excellent, educational videos in a huge, intuitive directory. Organized, reviewed, rated, and described by teachers. Ideal as a supplement to a curriculum or for independent study. Designed for teachers, students, parents, homeschoolers, educators … and all life-long learners!
Kalin Wilburn

Digital Learning Day :: Home - 67 views

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    you tube intro to digital learning day
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    Join us as we create a national awareness campaign to celebrate innovative teachers and instructional strategies. Technology has changed the way we do everything from grocery shopping, to listening to music, and reading books. It's time to take action to leverage this potential with more innovative uses of technology in our nation's schools to ensure every student experiences personalized learning with great teaching.
ivan alba

Learner.org - Teacher Professional Development - 19 views

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    Resources for teachers and students. Videos, interactive lessons, games, and more covering all disciplines and grade levels.
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    Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum
tlkirsten

Educational Leadership:How Teachers Learn:Learning with Blogs and Wikis - 57 views

  • Bloggers spend significant time pushing their own thinking—and having their thinking pushed by others. They respond to comments and link to other writers, connecting to and creating interesting ideas. Some develop curriculum and instructional materials together. Others review resources and debate the merits of the individual tools of teaching. Philosophical conversations about what works in schools are common as teachers talk about everything from homework and grading practices to school and district policies that affect teaching and learning. Blogs become a forum for public articulation—and public articulation is essential for educators interested in refining and revising their thinking about teaching and learning.
  • That's when I introduce them to RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed readers.
Josh Flores

Using Groups Effectively: 10 Principles « The Window - 172 views

  • Having students work in groups reaps a bounty of benefits, including boosting students’ social skills and upping the number of “happy campers” in the classroom.
  • As with every aspect of teaching, using groups effectively requires mindful planning and attention to more than who works with whom.
  • Putting people into groups isn’t a magical dust that makes everyone more creative. It has to be the right kind of group, and the group has to match the task
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    • Josh Flores
       
      Really? This is something I'm guilty of. 
  • Do not appoint a group “leader.”
    • Josh Flores
       
      Also guilty
  • small
  • Think threefold
    • Josh Flores
       
      This is why I like starting with a free write
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    "I recently attended a conference session featuring Keith .. an expert on the effectiveness of group efforts. His presentation focused on what has been and potentially can be accomplished through collaboration, but he hinted that just getting people into groups is not the answer. .. Though his focus is on creativity, I think Sawyer's insights apply to our use of groups to foster learning. Here are ten principles I've picked up:"
Carla Wimmersberger

Learning. Your time starts… now! | Betchablog - 47 views

  • If you accept that Learning is a Conversation, and that some of the most powerful learning can take place in the process of conversing and exchanging ideas with others, then setting up ways to have as many of these conversations as possible seems like an obvious thing to do.
  • It might be easy to think that the people on the stage at conferences have the knowledge and that if we simply listen to them we will get wisdom, but the truth is that sometimes it just doesn't work like that, and even if it does, most of those ideas gather far more momentum once we start to internalise them through further conversation with others. Ideas beget ideas, one thing leads to another, and you often find some of the best, most useful ideas come to you not from what was said by a speaker, but from things that came to to you as a result of further conversation about what was said.  (by the way, the same logic applies in classrooms too!)
  • If we limit our notion of learning to the "official" channel - the teacher, the textbook, the syllabus - we miss so much. Yes, learning happens at school, but what about outside school? Yes, learning happens in the classroom, but what about outside the classroom? Yes, learning happens in the act of "being taught", but what about when we are not "being taught"?
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  • Our schools system implies that when we ring the bell to signal the start of a class, we are really saying that the learning starts... wait for it... now!  And at the end of the lesson we ring it again to say the learning now stops. Ok, school's over, you can all stop learning now. Until tomorrow.
  • if we acknowledge that creativity in education is important, then how can we teach kids to be creative if we continue to focus on just regurgitating standard answers to standard questions, year after year. Because if it's only about learning pre-defined content then you don't need creativity, and you don't need conversation. Learning in messy and there is no point extending our thinking into new and creative areas if we aren't committed to that notion, because that just muddies up all those nice clean facts we have to remember.
  • Papert said that the one really valuable skill for a 21st century learner is that of being able to "learn to learn"... To be able not just to know the answers to what you were taught in school, but to know how to find the answers to those things you were not taught in school.
  • So how do virtual communities fit into this? They are an obvious and convenient way of extending conversations with other likeminded people, no matter where (or when) in the world they might be.
  • Unfor
  • If you accept that Learning is a Conversation , and that some of the most powerful learning can take place in the process of conversing and exchanging ideas with others, then setting up ways to have as many of these conversations as possible seems like an obvious thing to do.
  • If we limit our notion of learning to the "official" channel - the teacher, the textbook, the syllabus - we miss so much. Yes, learning happens at school, but what about outside school? Yes, learning happens in the classroom, but what about outside the classroom? Yes, learning happens in the act of "being taught", but what about when we are not "being taught"?  Our schools system implies that when we ring the bell to signal the start of a class, we are really saying that the learning starts... wait for it... now!   And at the end of the lesson we ring it again to say the learning now stops. Ok, school's over, you can all stop learning now. Until tomorrow.
  •  if we acknowledge that creativity in education is important, then how can we teach kids to be creative if we continue to focus on just regurgitating standard answers to standard questions, year after year. Because if it's only about learning pre-defined content then you don't need creativity, and you don't need conversation. Learning in messy and there is no point extending our thinking into new and creative areas if we aren't committed to that notion, because that just muddies up all those nice clean facts we have to remember.
Kurt Schmidt

A Perfect Storm in Undergraduate Education, Part 2 - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher E... - 43 views

  • But, in the past few generations, the imagery and rhetoric of academic marketing have cultivated a belief that college will be, if not decadent, at least primarily recreational: social activities, sporting events, and travel.
  • Increasingly, students are buying an "experience" instead of earning an education, and, in the competition to attract customers, that's what's colleges are selling.
  • a growing percentage of students are arriving at college without ever having written a research paper, read a novel, or taken an essay examination. And those students do not perceive that they have missed something in their education; after all, they have top grades. In that context, the demands of professors for different kinds of work can seem bewildering and unreasonable, and students naturally gravitate to courses with more-familiar expectations.
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  • Students increasingly are pressured to go to college not because they want to learn (much less become prepared for the duties of citizenship), but because they and their parents believe—perhaps rightly—that not going will exclude them from middle-class jobs.
  • At most universities, a student is likely to be unknown to the professor and would expect to feel like a nuisance, a distraction from more important work.
  • As academic expectations have decreased, social programming and extracurricular activities have expanded to fill more than the available time. That is particularly the case for residential students, for whom the possibility of social isolation is a source of great anxiety.
  • College has become unaffordable for most people without substantial loans; essentially they are mortgaging their future in the expectation of greater earnings. In order to reduce borrowing, more and more students leave class early or arrive late or neglect assignments, because they are working to provide money for tuition or living expenses.
  • As students' anxiety about the future increases, no amount of special pleading for general-education courses on history, literature, or philosophy—really anything that is not obviously job-related—will convince most students that they should take those courses seriously.
  • But at the major universities, most professors are too busy to care about individual students, and it is easy to become lost amid a sea of equally disenchanted undergraduates looking for some kind of purpose—and not finding it.
  • we need to make "rigorous and high-quality educational experiences a moral imperative."
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    ". . . we need to make 'rigorous and high-quality educational experiences a moral imperative.'"
John Dorn

Quicklyst: Take Outline Notes and Study from Your Amazon Kindle, iPhone, iPad, Android ... - 108 views

shared by John Dorn on 28 Jan 11 - No Cached
    • John Dorn
       
      This looks like a great tool for students taking notes during class.
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    Quicklyst is a nice tool for taking notes and creating outlines. Quicklyst provides a simple outline template that you can use to take notes.
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    Note taking site
clconzen

20 Technology Skills that Every Educator Should Have | Digital Learning Environments - 171 views

  • could be/might be used in a classroom.
\ 1.    Google Tools Knowledge2.    Google Earth Knowledge3.    Wiki Knowledge4.    Blogging Knowledge5.    Spreadsheets Skills6.    Database Skills7.    Social Bookmarking Knowledge8.    Social Networking Knowledge9.    Web Resources in content area 10.    Web Searching skills11.    Web2.0 Tools 12.    Interactive White Board skills (SmartBoard and Promethean)13.    Website design and management skills14.    Presentation Tools 15.    IM knowledge16.    Video and Podcasting
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    lists skills with resources
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    Useful re: Tech Competencies - 20 Technology Skills that Every Educator Should Have http://t.co/5y2u1ECH #edtech
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