Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Group items tagged no_tag assessment

Rss Feed Group items tagged

worcestere

Flipgrid - Video for student engagement and formative assessment - 52 views

  •  
    Teachers post topics and then students are able to respond with a short video clip. Students can then view and comment on responses (moderated by teacher). Free and paid versions.
fachdidaktik

10 Innovative Formative Assessment Examples for Teachers - 97 views

  •  
    Formative Assessment
Michele Rosen

Super Teacher Tools - 140 views

  •  
    Easy to use online games for review, etc. - Jeopardy, Millionaire, & Speed Match
Michele Rosen

EDpuzzle - 50 views

shared by Michele Rosen on 07 Oct 14 - No Cached
  •  
    "Make any video your lesson"
Ross Davis

Digital Student Portfolios: A Whole-School Approach | MiddleWeb - 73 views

  •  
    The particular software and services used to create these portfolios is a subject of some interest, to be sure, but it is secondary to the "big idea" itself: compiling a dynamic collection of information from many sources, in many forms and with many purposes, all aimed at presenting the most complete story possible of a student's learning experience.
Sharin Tebo

Teaching Metacognition - 78 views

  • Step 1: Teach students that the ability to learn is not a fixed quantity The key to a student's ability to become a self-regulated (i.e., metacognitive) learner is understanding that one's ability to learn is a skill that develops over time rather than a fixed trait, inherited at birth.
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      Carol Dweck's book on having a Growth Mindset comes to mind here...
  • Step 2: Teach students how to set goals and plan to meet them
  • Step 3: Give students opportunities to practice self-monitoring and adapting Accurate self-monitoring is quite difficult.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • In particular, students are encouraged to think about the key points of the lecture as they listen and take notes. At the end of the lecture, students write what they think the three most important ideas of the lecture were on an index card.
  • Example: lecture wrappers
  • Teaching Self-Monitoring Strategies Monitoring and adapting strategies can be taught as learning habits. A wrapper is one tool for teaching self-monitoring behavior. A wrapper is an activity that surrounds an existing assignment or activity and encourages metacognition. For example, wrappers can be used with lectures, homework assignments, or exams. Wrappers require just a few extra minutes of time, but can have a big impact.
  • Example: homework wrappers Before beginning a homework assignment, students answer a brief set of self-assessment questions focusing on skills they should be monitoring. Students complete the homework as usual, and then answer a follow-up set of self-assessment questions.
  • Example: exam wrappers When graded exams are returned (as soon as possible after the exam was given), students complete an exam reflection sheet. They describe their study strategies, analyze the mistakes they made, and plan their study strategies for the next exam.
  •  
    "Metacognition is a critically important, yet often overlooked component of learning. Effective learning involves planning and goal-setting, monitoring one's progress, and adapting as needed. All of these activities are metacognitive in nature. By teaching students these skills - all of which can be learned - we can improve student learning. There are three critical steps to teaching metacognition:"
  •  
    Really useful reminder of how we need to address very basic ideas about how to absorb new information and ask students to self-monitor and push themselves. I appreciated the information and plan to incorporate the wrappers!
Sonja Phillips

https://plickers.com/ - 127 views

  •  
    I had to look at some YouTube videos before I really understood how this works. A student response system that you can do without any computers for the students. Love this, I'm trying it this week! Undate: I tried this wonderful student response system this week. It worked great and the kids were into it!
  •  
    Instant feedback using your phone/tablet. Students have cards to show their answer (A, B, C, or D). Quick formative assessment data without the need for student devices.
  •  
    Tool to collect real-time formative assessment without the need for student devices; app download to iPad/iPhone - QR code pre-printed; kids hold up the QR code oriented to the multiple choice options - teacher scans room with their device and receives data on device
Michele Rosen

https://www.plickers.com/ - 82 views

shared by Michele Rosen on 30 Apr 14 - No Cached
  •  
    Student polling and formative assessment system for a one-device classroom.
  •  
    Love Plickers!
Michele Rosen

geddit - 78 views

shared by Michele Rosen on 23 Mar 14 - No Cached
  •  
    Students rank their understanding in this free, real-time app.
Michele Rosen

eduCanon - 32 views

shared by Michele Rosen on 28 Feb 14 - No Cached
anonymous

College papers: Students hate writing them. Professors hate grading them. Let's stop as... - 69 views

  •  
    "Nobody hates writing papers as much as college instructors hate grading papers (and no, having a robot do it is not the answer)."
Michele Rosen

Kahoot! | Game-based blended learning & classroom response system - 133 views

shared by Michele Rosen on 31 Oct 13 - No Cached
  • A game-based classroom response system For schools, universities, & businesses
  • Ask thought provoking questions
  • Easy-to-use, inclusive & highly engaging
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Students, take control of your own learning
  •  
    This has got to be the funkiest instant poll, quiz, response site around. Create questions, quizzes and polls with optional uploaded images for participants to complete in real time from a computer or mobile device. The users access the quiz by using a pin code. The 'question master' gets the data back instantly and it is stored on the site or can be downloaded. This is superb for checking the knowledge of children in your class or that your audience is still awake. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ICT+%26+Web+Tools
  •  
    A fun online interactive, gamebased way to give quizzes. You can also do discussions and survey. Here is a short youtube video on how to use it, www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfoyDG8HG6A&list=UUaW4ssrzSaQeAZbA3mo73DQ
  •  
    An easy and fun way to give quizzes. You can also do discussions and surveys. Here is a short youtube video on how to use it, www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfoyDG8HG6A&list=UUaW4ssrzSaQeAZbA3mo73DQ
mswanty

De-grade your classroom with narrative feedback SmartBlogs - 132 views

  • Grades, conversely, discourage learning, as students either feel like failures upon receiving low marks or have a falsely-inflated sense of accomplishment based on high marks, which are almost always subjective.
    • mswanty
       
      Do students feel this way?
  • SE2R — Summarize, Explain, Redirect and Resubmit
  • Since disdaining grades in favor of narrative feedback, I spend much more time doing what my colleagues call grading. I evaluate and re-evaluate student work daily. Project feedback is ongoing. I have 120 students so I’m writing seemingly all of the time. I’m often asked by teachers and friends, “Isn’t it a lot of work?”  Definitely. Would I ever return to traditional grading? Never.
    • mswanty
       
      So narrative grading takes more time, but it is worth it. I am still wondering what he puts on the report card...
    • Brianna Crowley
       
      Me too! I commented on this article with some of my own reservations or obstacles with implementing this in my own classroom.
BalancEd Tech

Grading Group Work Effectively - Blog - SociologySource.com - 37 views

    • BalancEd Tech
       
      Add in:1) jigsaw parts of project and make parts interdependent2) if using a wiki, check the history to see who contributed what3) figure out ways to help them help each other constructively http://sociologysource.squarespace.com/storage/materials/SelfGroupAssessment.doc https://balancedtech.wikispaces.com/Teamwork+Rubric
  •  
    Add in: 1) jigsaw parts of project and make parts interdependent 2) if using a wiki, check the history to see who contributed what 3) figure out ways to help them help each other constructively http://sociologysource.squarespace.com/storage/materials/SelfGroupAssessment.doc https://balancedtech.wikispaces.com/Teamwork+Rubric
anonymous

for the love of learning: Grading without Grading - 18 views

  •  
    Joe Bower, a 6th grade teacher in Canada, shares the email and response from Alfie Kohn he sent in 2006 describing how he grades without grades.  In the comments at the bottom, many others share their approaches and struggles.
Michelle Mattson

Socrative | Student Response System | Audience Response Systems | Clicker | Clickers | ... - 141 views

  •  
    Socrative is a smart student response system that empowers teachers to engage their classrooms through a series of educational exercises and games via smartphones, laptops, and tablets.
  • ...3 more comments...
  •  
     a smart student response system that empowers teachers to engage their classrooms through a series of educational exercises and games via smartphones, laptops, and tablets.
  •  
    Socrative is now live! They have been beta testing and it just came open to the public - so excited!
  •  
    Socrative is a smart student response system that empowers teachers to engage their classrooms through a series of educational exercises and games via smartphones, laptops, and tablets.
  •  
    Socrative is a smart student response system that empowers teachers to engage their classrooms through a series of educational exercises and games via smartphones, laptops, and tablets. Teachers can pose various questions to students, and once students respond, a report is generated in Excel format that can be used as assessment.
  •  
    Socrative is a smart student response system that empowers teachers to engage their classrooms through a series of educational exercises and games via smartphones, laptops, and tablets.
Marc Patton

Quia - 47 views

  •  
    Quia web - create your own ... costs 49$ 
  •  
    IXL Practice makes perfect, and IXL makes math practice fun! IXL allows teachers and parents to monitor the progress of their students and motivate them through interactive games and practice questions. Widely recognized as the Web's most comprehensive math site, IXL offers a dynamic and enjoyable environment for children to practice math. Students who use IXL are succeeding like never before. Quia Web Quia Web provides educators with learning tools to create, customize, and share their curriculum online. Quia Web pioneered and brought the "create-your-own" concept to educators around the world-giving them the freedom to go beyond publisher-provided materials and create their own interactive, online experiences for their students. Quia Books Quia Books are Web-based versions of workbooks and textbooks, and are produced in partnership with the world's leading publishers. Built on our award-winning technology platform, Quia books engage students and make the learning process more satisfying through interactive exercises replete with vibrant color, sound, and images. Educators reap the timesaving benefits of computer-based grading and tracking and can fully customize Quia books based on individual course materials.
Benjamin Light

The Costs of Overemphasizing Achievement - 83 views

  • First, students tend to lose interest in whatever they’re learning. As motivation to get good grades goes up, motivation to explore ideas tends to go down. Second, students try to avoid challenging tasks whenever possible. More difficult assignments, after all, would be seen as an impediment to getting a top grade. Finally, the quality of students’ thinking is less impressive. One study after another shows that creativity and even long-term recall of facts are adversely affected by the use of traditional grades.
    • Deb White Groebner
       
      SO true!
    • Terie Engelbrecht
       
      Very true; especially the "avoiding challenging tasks" part.
  • Unhappily, assessment is sometimes driven by entirely different objectives--for example, to motivate students (with grades used as carrots and sticks to coerce them into working harder) or to sort students (the point being not to help everyone learn but to figure out who is better than whom)
  • Standardized tests often have the additional disadvantages of being (a) produced and scored far away from the classroom, (b) multiple choice in design (so students can’t generate answers or explain their thinking), (c) timed (so speed matters more than thoughtfulness) and (d) administered on a one-shot, high-anxiety basis.
  • ...36 more annotations...
  • The test designers will probably toss out an item that most students manage to answer correctly.
  • the evidence suggests that five disturbing consequences are likely to accompany an obsession with standards and achievement:
  • 1. Students come to regard learning as a chore.
  • intrinsic motivation and extrinsic motivation tend to be inversely related: The more people are rewarded for doing something, the more they tend to lose interest in whatever they had to do to get the reward.
  • 2. Students try to avoid challenging tasks.
  • they’re just being rational. They have adapted to an environment where results, not intellectual exploration, are what count. When school systems use traditional grading systems--or, worse, when they add honor rolls and other incentives to enhance the significance of grades--they are unwittingly discouraging students from stretching themselves to see what they’re capable of doing.
  • 3. Students tend to think less deeply.
  • 4. Students may fall apart when they fail.
  • 5. Students value ability more than effort
    • Deb White Groebner
       
      This is the reinforcement of a "fixed mindset" (vs. (growth mindset) as described by Carol Dweck.
  • They seem to be fine as long as they are succeeding, but as soon as they hit a bump they may regard themselves as failures and act as though they’re helpless to do anything about it.
  • When the point isn’t to figure things out but to prove how good you are, it’s often hard to cope with being less than good.
  • It may be the systemic demand for high achievement that led him to become debilitated when he failed, even if the failure is only relative.
  • But even when better forms of assessment are used, perceptive observers realize that a student’s score is less important than why she thinks she got that score.
  • just smart
  • luck:
  • tried hard
  • task difficulty
  • It bodes well for the future
  • the punch line: When students are led to focus on how well they are performing in school, they tend to explain their performance not by how hard they tried but by how smart they are.
  • In their study of academically advanced students, for example, the more that teachers emphasized getting good grades, avoiding mistakes and keeping up with everyone else, the more the students tended to attribute poor performance to factors they thought were outside their control, such as a lack of ability.
  • When students are made to think constantly about how well they are doing, they are apt to explain the outcome in terms of who they are rather than how hard they tried.
  • And if children are encouraged to think of themselves as "smart" when they succeed, doing poorly on a subsequent task will bring down their achievement even though it doesn’t have that effect on other kids.
  • The upshot of all this is that beliefs about intelligence and about the causes of one’s own success and failure matter a lot. They often make more of a difference than how confident students are or what they’re truly capable of doing or how they did on last week’s exam. If, like the cheerleaders for tougher standards, we look only at the bottom line, only at the test scores and grades, we’ll end up overlooking the ways that students make sense of those results.
  • the problem with tests is not limited to their content.
  • if too big a deal is made about how students did, thus leading them (and their teachers) to think less about learning and more about test outcomes.
  • As Martin Maehr and Carol Midgley at the University of Michigan have concluded, "An overemphasis on assessment can actually undermine the pursuit of excellence."
  • Only now and then does it make sense for the teacher to help them attend to how successful they’ve been and how they can improve. On those occasions, the assessment can and should be done without the use of traditional grades and standardized tests. But most of the time, students should be immersed in learning.
  • the findings of the Colorado experiment make perfect sense: The more teachers are thinking about test results and "raising the bar," the less well the students actually perform--to say nothing of how their enthusiasm for learning is apt to wane.
  • The underlying problem concerns a fundamental distinction that has been at the center of some work in educational psychology for a couple of decades now. It is the difference between focusing on how well you’re doing something and focusing on what you’re doing.
  • The two orientations aren’t mutually exclusive, of course, but in practice they feel different and lead to different behaviors.
  • But when we get carried away with results, we wind up, paradoxically, with results that are less than ideal.
  • Unfortunately, common sense is in short supply today because assessment has come to dominate the whole educational process. Worse, the purposes and design of the most common forms of assessment--both within classrooms and across schools--often lead to disastrous consequences.
  • grades, which by their very nature undermine learning. The proper occasion for outrage is not that too many students are getting A’s, but that too many students have been led to believe that getting A’s is the point of going to school.
  • research indicates that the use of traditional letter or number grades is reliably associated with three consequences.
  • Iowa and Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills,
    • Benjamin Light
       
      I wonder how the MAP test is set?
  •  
    The message of Daniel Pinks book "Drive" applies here. Paying someone more, i.e. good grades, does not make them better thinkers, problems solvers, or general more motivated in what they are doing. thanks for sharing.
  •  
    Excellent summary!
Adrienne Schroeder

Flubaroo Assessment - 68 views

shared by Adrienne Schroeder on 24 Mar 11 - No Cached
  •  
    This seemed to work well - thanks for the tip!
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    Use flubaroo to grade quizzes made in goggle docs.
  •  
    Flubaroo will automatically grade assignments given via Google Docs.
  •  
    Simple templates in Google docs to automate grading of assignments
1 - 20 of 24 Next ›
Showing 20 items per page