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Sean Nash

Aligning Philosophy and Practice - nashworld - 26 views

    One of my foundational rules of classroom engagement is simply this: never be the first one to open your mouth and start talking about any topic. Twenty years in the classroom taught me that one. Never assume. Never take prior knowledge for granted. Listen first, then act. Never presume to know what the students in front of you are capable of. They'll show you if you are bold enough to listen.
Sharin Tebo

5 Reasons Why Reading Conferences Matter - Especially in High School English | Three Te... - 55 views

  • Reading Conferences
  • Every child needs one-on-one conversations with an adult as often as possible.
  • One way to show our adolescent students that we care is to talk with them. And face-to-face conversations about books and reading is a pretty safe way to do so, not to mention that we model authentic conversations about reading when we do.
  • ...12 more annotations...
  • The more we grow in empathy, the better relationship we’ll have with our friends, our families and all other people we associate with — at least the idealist in me will cling to that hope as I continue to talk to students about books and reading.
  • circles about engagement.
      • Try questions like:

        • How’s it going? (Thanks, Carl Anderson)
        • Why did you choose this book?
        • Do you know anyone else who has read this book? What’d she think?
        • How’d you find the time to read this week?
        • What’s standing in the way of your reading time?
      • Try questions like:

        • What character reminds you of yourself or someone you know?
        • What part of the story is the most similar/different to your life?
        • Why do you think the author makes that happen in the book?
        • What does he want us to learn about life?
        • How does this story/character/conflict/event make you think about life differently?
  • when I take the time to talk to each student individually, and reinforce the skill in a quick chat, the application of that skill some how seeps into their brains much deeper.
      • Try questions like:

        • Tell me about _____ that we learned in class today. How does that relate to your book/character?
        • Remember when we learned _____, tell me how/where you see that in your book.
        • Think about when we practiced ___, where does the author do that in your book?
        • You’ve improved with ___, how could you use that skill for _______?
  • We must provide opportunities for our students to grow into confident and competent readers and writers in order to handle the rigor and complexity of post high school education and beyond. We must remember to focus on literacy not on the literature
  • We must validate our readers, ask questions that spark confidence, avoid questions that demean or make the student defensive, and at the same time challenge our readers into more complex texts.
      • Try questions like:

        • On a scale of 1 to 10 how complex is this book for you? Why?
        • What do you do when the reading gets difficult?
        • Of all the books you’ve read this year, which was the most challenging? Why?
        • How’s it going finding vocabulary for your personal dictionary?
        • Tell me how you are keeping track of the parallel storyline?
  • I ask students about their confidence levels in our little chats, and they tell me they know they have grown as a readers. This is the best kind of reward.
      • Try questions like:

        • How has your confidence grown as you’ve read this year?
        • What do you think is the one thing we’ve done in class that’s helped you improve so much as a reader?
        • How will the habits you’ve created in class help you in the reading you’ll have to do in college?
        • Why do you think you’ve grown so much as a reader the past few weeks?
        • What’s different for you now in the way you learn than how you learned before?
        • Describe for me the characteristics you have that make you a reader.
  • What kinds of questions work for you in your reading conferences?
Deborah Baillesderr

Commonlit - 56 views

    "COMMONLIT is a collection of poems, short stories, news articles, historical documents, and literature for classrooms."
Tony Bollino

How Videogames Like Minecraft Actually Help Kids Learn to Read | WIRED - 44 views

    • Tony Bollino
      Yep!  The kids do this at home.
    Article with some research on the benefits of reading and minecraft.  Students seek information at higher reading levels to learn minecraft.

Session 234 - Literacy Subject Special - 2 views

    Summary and Storify from #UKEdChat Literacy Subject Special
Deborah Baillesderr

We Give Books - 67 views

    Lots of online ebook for free!
    I would like to get in touch regarding your experience with eBooks for research we are doing.
    Dr. Patricia Donohue, San Francisco State University,
Deborah Baillesderr

National Geographic Young Explorer (Student Magazine) - 66 views

    These are archieved issues, but students can read or listen to them and it has many teacher resources with each issue.
Matt Renwick

Project Time and How My Students Made It Theirs | Blogging Through the Fourth Dimension - 38 views

  • So project time is here to stay, with a few tweaks requested by the kids.  More resources, computers if they are available, and study hall rather than dedicated spelling time.
  • my students are examples of what can happen when we trust kids  to take control of their learning, when we give them freedom to learn.
Wes Bolton

Serious reading takes a hit from online scanning and skimming, researchers say - The Wa... - 89 views

    "To cognitive neuroscientists, Handscombe's experience is the subject of great fascination and growing alarm. Humans, they warn, seem to be developing digital brains with new circuits for skimming through the torrent of information online. This alternative way of reading is competing with traditional deep reading circuitry developed over several millennia."
    Washington Post article on how the internet is impacting our ability to read and concentrate.
Amy Burns

Newsela | Nonfiction Literacy and Current Events - 47 views

    Current events readings that allows selecting lexile to meet student needs.
Matt Renwick

Use Post-Its + Evernote For Ongoing Literacy Assessment | Reading By Example - 73 views

    As 21st century educators, we don't have to be tethered to technology to reap the benefits. By using digital tools such as Evernote and Post-Its to support quality instruction, instead of the other way around, we can stay focused on the learner and their needs.
Roland Gesthuizen

International Reading Association (IRA) - ReadWriteThink - 33 views

    "IRA offers members new approaches to teaching literacy, easy ways to stay up to date on the latest research, and opportunities to connect with local literacy leaders. The mission of the International Reading Association (IRA) is to promote reading by continuously advancing the quality of literacy instruction and research worldwide. The Association provides outstanding professional development and supports excellent teaching, critical research, and promotion of the lifetime reading habit."
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