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MaryLiz Jones

Sample Maker Rubric | Edutopia - 80 views

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    Design and creative thinking rubric - worth your time to review
Sharin Tebo

Why Curiosity Enhances Learning | Edutopia - 40 views

  • It's no secret that curiosity makes learning more effective and enjoyable. Curious students not only ask questions, but also actively seek out the answers.
  • While it might be no big surprise that we're more likely to remember what we've learned when the subject matter intrigues us, it turns out that curiosity also helps us learn information we don't consider all that interesting or important. The researchers found that, once the subjects' curiosity had been piqued by the right question, they were better at learning and remembering completely unrelated information
  • if a student struggles with math, personalizing math problems to match their specific interests rather than using generic textbook questions could help them better remember how to go about solving similar math problems in the future.
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  • there is no such thing as a dumb question, because as cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham notes in his book Why Don't Students Like School?, it's the question that stimulates curiosity -- being told the answer quells curiosity before it can even get going.
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    Curiosity's role in Students' Learning
Deborah Baillesderr

Mobile Learning: Resource Roundup | Edutopia - 44 views

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    Great resources!
Matt Renwick

Project-Based Learning Through a Maker's Lens | Edutopia - 43 views

  • Choosing, thinking, reflecting, and sorting possible projects should be a career-long process. Good projects don't fade with time -- they get richer and more exciting for both teacher and student.
  • Great projects, on the other hand, are opportunities for learners and teachers to collaborate with those around them.
A Gardner

7 Apps for Teaching Children Coding Skills | Edutopia - 105 views

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    7 Apps for Teaching Children Coding Skills http://t.co/0OJSXaf3RW via @edutopia #swcenteran
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    7 Apps for Teaching Children Coding Skills http://t.co/0OJSXaf3RW via @edutopia #swcenteran
Roland Gesthuizen

The Great "Respect" Deception | Edutopia - 46 views

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    I define a rule as what you enforce every time it's broken. Platitudes cannot be enforced because there is no line to cross, there's nothing predictable for students to understand, and they're too vague to be useful. In essence, these clumps allow teachers to enforce anything whenever they want under any conditions they chose. It's a get into jail free card. Rules aren't reduced by clumping them -- they are only hidden from students. Often, the only way students can find the real lines is by crossing them. This encourages rule breaking rather than stopping it.
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    I define a rule as what you enforce every time it's broken. Platitudes cannot be enforced because there is no line to cross, there's nothing predictable for students to understand, and they're too vague to be useful. In essence, these clumps allow teachers to enforce anything whenever they want under any conditions they chose. It's a get into jail free card. Rules aren't reduced by clumping them -- they are only hidden from students. Often, the only way students can find the real lines is by crossing them. This encourages rule breaking rather than stopping it.
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    I find, however, that if you inundate students with rules and consequences, especially when they are the same rules every time, students view these as your expectations of their behavior. When they believe you expect the worst from them, they will rise to that expectation. Many rules teachers make are actually procedures, as defined by Henry Wong. If we teach procedures instead, and simply reteach the procedure every time it is not followed, they eventually get tired of being retaught the procedure and just do it. I think what some in education forget is that students, no matter what age, expect and deserve respect, too. If we consistently offer respect and dignity, even when we aren't receiving it in return, the rest of the class notices and responds in return. There need to be some rules that are clearly stated with real enforceable consequences. They need to be only a few and very important. Every professional work place has a few. But we also need to send the clear message that school, as preparing them for the workplace that will not have a100 page rule book, is where we are showing them a model of behavior that is *implicitly* expected in every segment of society.
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    "Because so many educators have come to believe the myth of "the fewer rules, the better" (which I was taught in my teacher training program), they have developed what I call deception clumps. They throw as many rules as possible into a respectably titled non-communicative clump: "
Don Doehla

Knowledge in Action: "AP+" Project: Research on a Project-Based Learning Approach to AP... - 25 views

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    Knowledge in Action, AP+Project-Research-a #PBL Approach to #AP via @Edutopia http://ow.ly/mi8gB #actfl #langchat @ascd @biepbl #pblchat
psmiley

An Introduction to Project-Based Learning | Edutopia - 1 views

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    PBL intro video
Tracy Tuten

How Can We Make Assessments Meaningful? | Edutopia - 170 views

  • Criteria for a Meaningful Classroom Assessment To address these requirements, I ask myself the following guided questions: Does the assessment involve project-based learning? Does it allow for student choice of topics? Is it inquiry based? Does it ask that students use some level of internet literacy to find their answers? Does it involve independent problem solving? Does it incorporate the 4Cs? Do the students need to communicate their knowledge via writing in some way? Does the final draft or project require other modalities in its presentation? (visual, oral, data, etc...)
  • So how can high-stakes assessments be meaningful to students? For one thing, high-stakes tests shouldn't be so high-stakes. It's inauthentic. They should and still can be a mere snapshot of ability. Additionally, those occasional assessments need to take a back seat to the real learning and achievement going on in every day assessments observed by the teacher. The key here, however, is to assess everyday. Not in boring, multiple-choice daily quizzes, but in informal, engaging assessments that take more than just a snapshot of a student's knowledge at one moment in time. But frankly, any assessment that sounds cool can still be made meaningless. It's how the students interact with the test that makes it meaningful. Remember the 4 Cs and ask this: does the assessment allow for: Creativity Are they students creating or just regurgitating? Are they being given credit for presenting something other than what was described? Collaboration Have they spent some time working with others to formulate their thoughts, brainstorm, or seek feedback from peers? Critical Thinking Are the students doing more work than the teacher in seeking out information and problem solving? Communication Does the assessment emphasize the need to communicate the content well? Is there writing involved as well as other modalities? If asked to teach the content to other students, what methods will the student use to communicate the information and help embed it more deeply?
  • Another way to ensure that an assessment is meaningful, of course, is to simply ask the students what they thought. Design a survey after each major unit or assessment. Or, better yet, if you want to encourage students to really focus on the requirements on a rubric, add a row that's only for them to fill out for you. That way, the rubric's feedback is more of a give-and-take, and you get feedback on the assessment's level of meaningfulness as soon as possible.
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  • Download the example (left) of a quick rubric I designed for a general writing assessment. I included a row that the participants could fill out that actually gave me quick feedback on how meaningful or helpful they believed the assessment was towards their own learning.
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    Worthwhile article on designing meaningful assessments
carmelladoty

Kids Speak Out on Student Engagement | Edutopia - 35 views

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    What students think.... and they are correct.
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    What students say engages them in the classroom.
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    Students were asked "What engages you in school?" This article discusses the results.
A Gardner

Connecting to the 21st-Century Student | Edutopia - 110 views

  • This new generation of digital learners -- call them the MEdia Generation -- take in the world via the filter of computing devices: the cellular phones, handheld gaming devices, PDAs, and laptops they take everywhere, plus the computers, TVs, and game consoles at home.
Erin Crisp

Project-Based Learning Made Easy | Edutopia - 99 views

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    Highlights attainable examples of students and teachers participating in PBL
Carla Berryman

What Is Your Learning Style? | Edutopia - 153 views

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    a great ice breaker for students to help them define how they learn
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    multiple intelligence free on-line survey
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