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Nigel Coutts

Learning about change from a home cooked meal. - The Learner's Way - 7 views

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    Last week I decided that a good home cooked meal was in order. Lacking inspiration it turned to a recipe book I had been gifted the previous Christmas and found what appeared to be a tasty and nutritious option. I read on with enthusiasm and was soon imaging myself dining on this wholesome meal. If the end result looked half as good as the glossy picture that accompanied the recipe, I would be in luck.
Nigel Coutts

The Eight Cultural Forces - The lens & the lever - The Learner's Way - 15 views

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    This unavoidable and irreducible complexity means that schools are challenging place to study, to understand and to manage change within. Even for the teacher who spends everyday inside the school there is so much going on that unguided observations and the plans based upon them come with no guarantee of success. - We need a lens and a lever to manage this complexity. -  Such a lens is offered by the 'cultural forces'.
Nigel Coutts

For those about to make a resolution - The Learner's Way - 4 views

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    With the year rushing to a close, this seems like the right time to set goals for the year ahead. To pause and consider what next and make some personal promises.  The trouble is that the history of setting New Year Resolutions is littered with failures. It is so easy at this point  in time to make commitments for change and then just a few weeks later to have forgotten what they were.
Nigel Coutts

Why we fear data and how our perception can change. - The Learner's Way - 4 views

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    Data occupies a somewhat curious place within education. Mention it to teachers and you tend to get one of two responses. One group will roll their eyes and with great sarcasm how data is "so exciting". The other group responds with something akin to "actually I quite like data" indicating that experience has shown them that they are members of a small group. The question is why do some people find data to be a useful and fascinating tool while others see it as a good method for inducing sleep? 
Nigel Coutts

A stable foundation makes change possible - The Learner's Way - 7 views

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    The foundational stability of schools might be our greatest strength.Getting the fundamentals right and protecting them during change efforts is essential. 
Nigel Coutts

Overwhelmed by the constant pace of change - The Learner's Way - 15 views

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    Teaching is undoubtedly a busy profession and one where the end of the to do list seems to be forever located in a galaxy far far away. There is always more to be done and as each item on the list is ticked off, three, four or more seem to have appeared. If we ever do get close to the end, we find ourselves reflecting on what we have achieved and the many ways in which it might be improved. 
Dallas McPheeters

Change and why we all see it differently - The Learner's Way - 14 views

  • the rise of the ‘gig’ economy where freelance and short term contract work is common and training and retraining for new projects is the norm
  • it is more important to be able to learn than it is to be learned
  • If the young people of today are to thrive beyond the walls of the classroom they will need to be able to cope with a world characterised by volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity.
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  • teaching children who have lived their entire lives in that very century
  • multiple reports that detail the skills and dispositions children will need
  • there are broad typologies which emerge along a continuum from those who actively seek to change to those who actively resist it. 
  • There are those for whom change is the next adventure
  • There are those who are open to change but need to be shown the evidence.
  • There are those who need to be show how the change will impact them
  • There are those who publicly embrace the change but in the privacy of the classroom continue as they have always done
  • There are those who are outright afraid of change
  • “A person’s sense of identity is partly determined by his or her values, which can mesh or clash with organizational values”
  • There are of course also those for whom the change is just wrong
  • Change is always complicated. A the least it involves people, personalities, cultures, beliefs, values, emotions and identity.
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     If the young people of today are to thrive beyond the walls of the classroom they will need to be able to cope with a world characterised by volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity. The children of todays Kindergarten will enter the workplace in the fourth-decade of the 21st Century. We debate the merits of teaching 21st Century Skills and what they might be while teaching children who have lived their entire lives in that very century. The challenge is how will schools and individual teachers respond to this drive for urgent change.
Nigel Coutts

Culture, Change and the Individual - The Learner's Way - 17 views

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    A recent post by George Couros (author of The innovators Mindset) posed an interesting question about the role that culture plays in shaping the trajectory of an organisation. The traditional wisdom is that culture trumps all but George points to the role that individuals play in shaping and changing culture itself. Is culture perhaps less resilient than we are led to imagine and is it just a consequence of the individuals with the greatest influence? Or, is something else at play here?
Nigel Coutts

What truly drives change in Education? - The Learner's Way - 19 views

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    You do not need to look very hard to find a report claiming that schools and education needs to change. But real change needs more than teacher blaming and increased accountability. What will drive real change is . . .
Nigel Coutts

Why such a rapid pace of change? - The Learner's Way - 14 views

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    I am currently reading "Thank you for being late: An optimist's guide to thriving in the age of accelerations" and have found in this the answer to these questions. In essence we are confronting two types of change, one that we have always faced and one that is unique to our current times. 
Nigel Coutts

The BIG Three for Managing Change - The Learner's Way - 32 views

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    Understanding responses to change is critical and with the predicted future of education increasingly being linked to innovative practices which prepare students for an unknown future change is a central theme
Nigel Coutts

Embracing the complexity of change - The Learner's Way - 24 views

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    The potential for reliably predicting the outcome of any change effort is surely difficult if not even impossible once the number of influences becomes large. Acknowledging the complexity that exists and seeing the potential for growth, creativity and innovation that can exist within an organisation at 'the edge of chaos' are useful strategies as schools face a period of unprecedented change. 
Nigel Coutts

Change, culture and Cultural Change in Education - The Learner's Way - 22 views

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     Embedded in the very weave of the organisation, culture is the most difficult aspect of an organisation to change and the hardest form of change to sustain 'That's because transforming a culture requires influencing people's deepest beliefs and most habitual behaviours' (Rogers, Meehan & Tanne 2006 p5). Rogers et al indicate that as little as 10% of all organisations that set out to develop a high performing culture achieve their goal.
Roland Gesthuizen

8 Characteristics of the "Innovator's Mindset" | The Principal of Change - 45 views

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    "To be innovative, you have to look at yourself as an innovator first, and to create schools that embody this mindset as a "culture", we must develop this in individuals first."
Jennie Snyder

Why Kids Need Schools to Change | MindShift - 118 views

  • The current structure of the school day is obsolete, most would agree. Created during the Industrial Age, the assembly line system we have in place now has little relevance to what we know kids actually need to thrive
  • Yet therein lies the paradox. It’s exactly during these uncertain times when people must be willing to try new things, to be more open, curious and experimental, she said. In education, although there are great new models of learning and schooling, they are the exceptions, and the progressive movement has not gained much momentum.
  • “One thing we know for sure is that kids learn better when teachers are invested and paying attention and showing they care,” she said. “The biggest impact you’ll have as a teachers is the relationship you establish with your student.”
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  • The five criteria that Challenge Success brings to schools attempts to modernize the obsolete system in place today: scheduling, project based learning, alternative assessment, climate of care, and parent education.
  • Research shows that kids do better in classes where teachers know their names and say hello to them, and when they have their own advocates or advisers at school.
Jennie Snyder

Moving Forward - 65 views

  • So with all of this confusion, many ask why it is hard for people to accept change.  
  •  The problem with this is that people are more comfortable with what they know and have experienced, as opposed to what “could be”.  The other issue here is that if we cannot clearly articulate examples of powerful learning, why would anyone buy “change” in the first place?
  • It is clear to the world that something just isn’t working with institutional education and most people say that we need to CHANGE institutional education. But to the educators of the world, I am here today to say that I disagree. You don’t need to change anything,  you simply need to understand that the world is changing, and if you don’t change with it, the world will decide that it doesn’t need you anymore.
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  • New is nice, but ONLY if it is better.  
  • Leaders need to continuously articulate why a new initiative has made its way into schools, and should be ready to answer the tough questions.
  • if we really want to push education forward, different groups are really going to have to start coming together and putting plans into action.  This doesn’t make me “anti” anything, but I am definitely “pro-kids”.  That is what this is all about.
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    Great piece on educational jargon and the need for specificity in focusing our change efforts to move forward.
Jennie Snyder

Lydia Dobyns: A '21st Century' Education Is SO Last Century - 33 views

  • We can't know what the classroom will look or feel like. We do know, however, that most school districts are organized to deliver education that inhibits rather than encourages innovation. That needs to change.
  • like "Deeper Learning" as a way to convey both the acquisition of knowledge and the transference/application of knowledge along with developing skills employers find valuable -- collaboration, communications and critical thinking
  • t's time to move on and work together to develop education systems that meet students where they live and provide a relevant education to develop cognitive and non-cognitive skills
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  • Of course, schools and classroom practices need to be current -- what teacher or district leader would say that we should continue to teach the way we did back in the "good ol' days?" Can you show me a successful organization or business that prides itself on keeping things exactly the way they were?
  • We need to believe the adults delivering education services are capable of being innovative, adaptive and collaborative and welcome being accountable for student outcomes. Then we need to invest in this belief by providing both the professional development and the infrastructure to make this belief a reality for all students and all teachers.
  • Ultimately, it is about delivering core education in today's world by today's standards of success.
  • I believe this is the basic approach: Education needs to be more relevant and rigorous for students. Educational institutions need to be more engaging and empowering for teachers. A high school diploma needs to be more directly applicable and valued in the economy. These are attainable goals; all education investments should be measured against these objectives.
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    Lydia Dobyns: A '21st Century' Education Is SO Last Century http://t.co/fieSUgnj #deeperlearning #edleader21
Jennie Snyder

The Principal of Change - 0 views

  • The schools that have someone (or a group of people) helping to push the boundaries of what can be done in schools seem to move a lot quicker with a larger amount of “buy-in” through the process.
  • I do not believe change is solely dependent upon their skills, but also the culture in which they exist.
  • So although a change agent can trigger growth in an organization, the culture in which they exist or are brought into has a huge bearing on their success.  If a school embodies itself as a true learning organization, change will happen much quicker.
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  • individuals that are really successful in helping to be a catalyst for change certainly embody some similar characteristics
  • a “change agent” does not have to be the person in authority, but they do however have to have a clear vision and be able to communicate that clearly with others.
  • it is essential to tap into the strengths of the people you work with and help them see that there are many ways to work toward a common purpose.
  • To have sustainable change that is meaningful to people, it is something that they will have to embrace and see importance.
  • he persistence comes in that you will take opportunities to help people get a step closer often when they are ready, not just giving up on them after the first try.
  • When that solution is someone else’s, there is no accountability to see it through.
  • character and credibility”; they are not just seen as good people but that they are also knowledgeable in what they are speaking about.
  • If you want to create “change”, you have to not only be able to articulate what that looks like, but show it to others.
  • How can you really know how “kids learn” or if something works if you have never experienced it?
  • All of the above, means nothing if you do not have solid relationships with the people that you serve.
  • People will not want to grow if they do not trust the person that is pushing the change.
  • Trust is also built when you know someone will deal with things and not be afraid to do what is right, even if it is uncomfortable.
  • positive change is not reserved to be the responsibility of any position.
  • The best leaders may have all of these qualities but also empower others to be those “change agents” as well to build a culture of leadership and learning.
Jennie Snyder

Are You Behind? - 83 views

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    The 21st Century is now. David Jakes on getting with the times and creating the kinds of digital learning spaces our students need and deserve. 
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