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Nigel Coutts

Fostering a dispositional perspective of curiosity - The Learner's Way - 8 views

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    When we are young, we are naturally curious. We ask many, many questions. As we encounter the world, our consciousness is bombarded by a plethora of opportunities for curiosity. And at this early stage of exploring and discovering the world we inhabit, there is no filter between our sense of curiosity and our expression of our it. If we are curious, we will be asking questions and heaven help anyone close enough to be a potential source of answers. - At school, our relationship to both curiosity and inquiry changes.
Sharin Tebo

Scholastic Canada Education-Teaching Tip of the Month * January 2012 - 21 views

  • the power of compelling questions that drives deep interest, understanding, caring, and the application of 21st century skills.
  • During a whole group inquiry, students gain competence by being guided through the process and develop necessary skills and tools to aid in self-initiated inquiries. Often students don't have the necessary background knowledge to pose their own questions or lack understanding in identifying a question worthy of investigation so the large group approach is essential when getting started.
  • Begin by examining your curriculum and identifying a topic that you think will be interesting to students.
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  • Questions are open-ended in nature with no 'correct' answer; in fact, the answer is unknown. Inquiry questions represent what is at the "heart of the matter" and frame the unit as a puzzle or problem to be solved.
  • Your role in the large group inquiry is one of coach or facilitator.
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    Getting Started with Inquiry Learning in Your Classroom
Sharin Tebo

Why Curiosity Enhances Learning | Edutopia - 40 views

  • It's no secret that curiosity makes learning more effective and enjoyable. Curious students not only ask questions, but also actively seek out the answers.
  • While it might be no big surprise that we're more likely to remember what we've learned when the subject matter intrigues us, it turns out that curiosity also helps us learn information we don't consider all that interesting or important. The researchers found that, once the subjects' curiosity had been piqued by the right question, they were better at learning and remembering completely unrelated information
  • if a student struggles with math, personalizing math problems to match their specific interests rather than using generic textbook questions could help them better remember how to go about solving similar math problems in the future.
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  • there is no such thing as a dumb question, because as cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham notes in his book Why Don't Students Like School?, it's the question that stimulates curiosity -- being told the answer quells curiosity before it can even get going.
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    Curiosity's role in Students' Learning
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