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aaxtell

CCSS "I Can" statements for K-8 - 64 views

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    Kids learn best when they know what they're supposed to be learning. Make learning outcomes explicit with kid-friendly "I Can" statements tied to each Common Core standard.
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    Kids learn best when they know what they're supposed to be learning. Make learning outcomes explicit with kid-friendly "I Can" statements tied to each Common Core standard.
Matt Renwick

Common Core is a step forward in education - 17 views

  • Common Core is a step in that direction, and in many ways it is a necessary condition for any number of education reforms. Don't fall for cheap conspiracies. It's a major step forward.
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    Common Core is arbitrary and untested. Standards are fine, but need to have some basis in research, not just because the have financial support from rich people and corporations who think they know what's best for all.
Monica Williams-Mitchell

Education in the Age of Globalization » Blog Archive » Five Questions to Ask ... - 29 views

  • Daniel Pink observed, traditionally neglected talents, which he refers to as Right-brained directed skills, including design, story, symphony, empathy, play, and meaning, will become more valuable (Pink, 2006).
    • Monica Williams-Mitchell
       
      YES! We need to address these things. I don't see them as incompatible w CC, however.
  • international assessments such as PISA and TIMSS, which are mostly left-brained cognitive skills.
  • Common Core does not include an element to prepare the future generations to live in this globalized world and interact with people from different cultures.
    • Monica Williams-Mitchell
       
      But does that simple fact prevent us from addressing this? I think not.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • Common Core, by forcing children to master the same curriculum, essentially discriminates against talents that are not consistent with their prescribed knowledge and skills.
    • Monica Williams-Mitchell
       
      Is this any different from the current situation? Is this author arguing that we should not have common standards, or that we should maintain our current status quo of a patchwork of test-driven standards?
  • A well organized, tightly controlled, and well-executed education system can transmit the prescribed content much more effectively than one that is less organized, loosely monitored, and less unified. In the meantime, the latter allows for exceptions with more room for individual exploration and experimentation
    • Monica Williams-Mitchell
       
      I think the problem lies in seeing this as an either-or question. Any system that relies solely on testing as the measure of success is short-sighted and archaic. Having no identified common ground puts at risk the learners who most need a firm starting point. To say that the current system allows "more room for individual exploration and experimentation" is naive at best and disingenuous at worst. Where in test-crazed American schools do you see this happening??
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    A provocative article by Yong Zhao on CCSS and reflective questions we ought to as ourselves.
Steven Szalaj

No Learning Without Feeling - NYTimes.com - 67 views

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    An essay on an effect of Common Core Standards on the selection of literature to be studied, particularly in middle school
Steven Szalaj

The Common Core - Who's Minding the Schools? - NYTimes.com - 57 views

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    An essay on the effects of implementing Common Core Standards and testing related to those standards.
Steve Ransom

Stephen Krashen Pulls the Rug Out From Under the Standards Movement - Living in Dialogu... - 3 views

  • ur average scores are respectable but unspectacular because, as Farhi notes, we have such a high percentage of children living in poverty, the highest of all industrialized countries. Only four percent of children in high-scoring Finland, for example, live in poverty. Our rate of poverty is over 21%.
  • It means that the "problem" of American education is not ineffective teaching, not teachers' unions, not lack of national standards and tests, and not schools of education: It is poverty.
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    "It means that the "problem" of American education is not ineffective teaching, not teachers' unions, not lack of national standards and tests, and not schools of education: It is poverty." Sarah's comment is heartbreaking
teacherboyle

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics - 45 views

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    membership for a year
A Gardner

sbgbeginners - home - 1 views

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    via Chris Ludwig
Javier E

The Default Major - Skating Through B-School - NYTimes.com - 41 views

  • Dr. Mason, who teaches economics at the University of North Florida, believes his students are just as intelligent as they’ve always been. But many of them don’t read their textbooks, or do much of anything else that their parents would have called studying. “We used to complain that K-12 schools didn’t hold students to high standards,” he says with a sigh. “And here we are doing the same thing ourselves.”
  • all evidence suggests that student disengagement is at its worst in Dr. Mason’s domain: undergraduate business education.
  • “Business education has come to be defined in the minds of students as a place for developing elite social networks and getting access to corporate recruiters,”
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  • It’s an attitude that Dr. Khurana first saw in M.B.A. programs but has migrated, he says, to the undergraduate level.
  • Second, in management and marketing, no strong consensus has emerged about what students ought to learn or how they ought to learn it.
  • Gains on the C.L.A. closely parallel the amount of time students reported spending on homework. Another explanation is the heavy prevalence of group assignments in business courses: the more time students spent studying in groups, the weaker their gains in the kinds of skills the C.L.A. measures.
  • The pedagogical theory is that managers need to function in groups, so a management education without such experiences would be like medical training without a residency. While some group projects are genuinely challenging, the consensus among students and professors is that they are one of the elements of business that make it easy to skate through college.
  • “We’ve got students who don’t read, and grow up not reading,” he says. “There are too many other things competing for their time. The frequency and quantity of drinking keeps getting higher. We have issues with depression. Getting students alert and motivated — even getting them to class, to be honest with you — it’s a challenge.”
  • “A lot of classes I’ve been exposed to, you just go to class and they do the PowerPoint from the book,” he says. “It just seems kind of pointless to go when (a) you’re probably not going to be paying much attention anyway and (b) it would probably be worth more of your time just to sit with your book and read it.”
  • “It seems like now, every take-home test you get, you can just go and Google. If the question is from a test bank, you can just type the text in, and somebody out there will have it and you can just use that.”
  • This is not senioritis, he says: this is the way all four years have been. In a typical day, “I just play sports, maybe go to the gym. Eat. Probably drink a little bit. Just kind of goof around all day.” He says his grade-point average is 3.3.
  • concrete business skills tend to expire in five years or so as technology and organizations change.
  • History and philosophy, on the other hand, provide the kind of contextual knowledge and reasoning skills that are indispensable for business students.
  • when they hand in papers, they’re marked up twice: once for content by a professor with specialized expertise, and once for writing quality by a business-communication professor.
  • a national survey of 259 business professors who had been teaching for at least 10 years. On average, respondents said they had reduced the math and analytic-thinking requirements in their courses. In exchange, they had increased the number of requirements related to computer skills and group presentations.
  • what about employers? What do they want? According to national surveys, they want to hire 22-year-olds who can write coherently, think creatively and analyze quantitative data, and they’re perfectly happy to hire English or biology majors. Most Ivy League universities and elite liberal arts colleges, in fact, don’t even offer undergraduate business majors.
Bob Rowan

The Partnership for 21st Century Skills - State Initiatives - 84 views

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    Examples of states that have incorporated 21st century skills into state standards. See links to individual state profiles on the left of the screen. West Virgina and North Carolina cited as particularly good examples
Martha Hickson

Teacher Resources | Library of Congress - 71 views

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    Teacher resources from the LOC including info on incorporating primary sources.
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    Includes tool for searching for materials by state standards
Roland Gesthuizen

International Society for Technology in Education - Blog > A Rose is Still a Rose: Tran... - 107 views

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    The NETS help guide technology planning and curriculum development for all grade levels and provide a roadmap for digital age learning, teaching and leadership .. Recently, educators working on a NETS web page for staff and students tackled the challenge by translating the NETS for Students into action verbs .. Here's what they've come up with:"
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    Great to see these technology curriculum standards broken down into easy to digest verbs!
Tim Smith

Common Core State Standards Initiative | The Standards - 46 views

  • The Common Core State Standards focus on core conceptual understandings and procedures starting in the early grades, thus enabling teachers to take the time needed to teach core concepts and procedures well—and to give students the opportunity to master them.
    • Wendi Cyford
       
      Core Standards information
    • Tim Smith
       
      I have a mutliage looping classroom that includes both 5th & 6th graders togther. My question is, based on the obvious split in the CC between grade 3-5, and 6-8, is this a viable classroom setting anymore.
  • With students, parents and teachers all on the same page and working together for shared goals, we can ensure that students make progress each year and graduate from school prepared to succeed in college and in a modern workforce.
Bob Rowan

National Education Technology Plan 2010 | U.S. Department of Education - 30 views

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    national technology standards, from Spring 2010
Deb White Groebner

Education Week: Will We Ever Learn? - 37 views

  • All students should master a verifiable set of skills, but not necessarily the same skills. Part of the reason high schools fail so many kids is that educators can’t get free of the notion that all students—regardless of their career aspirations—need the same basic preparation. States are piling on academic courses, removing the arts, and downplaying career and technical education to make way for a double portion of math. Meanwhile, career-focused programs, such as Wisconsin’s youth apprenticeships and well-designed career academies, are engaging students and raising their post-high-school earnings, especially among hard-to-reach, at-risk male students.
  • Maintaining our one-size-fits-all approach will hurt many of the kids we are trying most to help. Maybe that approach, exemplified in the push for common standards, will simply lead to yet more unmet education goals. But it won’t reduce, and might increase, the already high rate at which students drop out of school, or graduate without the skills and social behaviors required for career success.
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    Well-written commentary for anyone interested in the impact of Common Core Standards. "What's Wrong With the Common-Standards Project" "We need rigorous but basic academics, homing in on skills that will be used, and not short-shrifting the "soft skill" behaviors that lead to success in college and careers. The management guru Peter Drucker got it right: "The result of a school is a student who has learned something and puts it to work 10 years later."
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