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Chema Falcó

Reconsider the Use of the SAMR Model - 26 views

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    If we look closely at the fundamental presupposition of SAMR model use then we will see that there are serious issues in how the model can enhance learning.
eaalvarez553

SAMR and Bloom's Taxonomy: Assembling the Puzzle | Common Sense Education - 37 views

  • Augmentation/Apply: Using a simple yet powerful tool for visualization like GeoGebra, students explore the concepts covered in the resources described in 1., and solve related standard problems. The scope and number of the problems is not governed by what is available in the “back of the book,” but rather driven by the evolution of student understanding, as measured by suitable formative assessment processes.
  • Substitution/Remember: Students use ebooks and other Open Education Resources to acquire basic knowledge about statistical tools and procedures. 2. Substitution/Understand: At the same time, they begin a process of gathering information online describing applications of these statistical tools to an area of interest to them, using simple bookmark aggregation services (e.g., Diigo, Delicious) to collect and tag these resources, relating them to the knowledge gained in 1.
Sharin Tebo

Guide: Using the SAMR Model to Guide Learning | That #EdTech Guy's Blog - 74 views

  • The SAMR Model (above) was developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura. It enables educators to analyse how effective their use of technology is on teaching and learning.
  • – Enhancement (Substitution and Augmentation) – technology is used just to enhance a task
  • – Transformation (Modification and Redefinition) – tasks are designed in a way which would not be possible without the use of technology
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  • Substitution – at this stage, technology is simply used as an alternative tool for completing the original task with no real change in the tasks function.
  • Example: instead of writing by hand, learners use an app like Pages to type up a report.
  • Example: once again, if students are creating a document on Pages, using the collaborative tools available on iWork for iCloud, learners can work on a document together. Peers could add feedback comments to the document in real time which could be responded to, which would improve the end product further.
  • Augmentation – here, technology is still used as a direct substitute like above, however it offers improvements in terms of the function of the task.
  • Example: again using Pages, however making use of features like spellchecking function or importing images to enhance the end product.
  • Modification – it is at this point where technology starts to enhance teaching and learning. It requires tasks to be redesigned, in order to make the most of the technology available.
  • it still does not improve the students learning experience.
  • Redefinition– this is the point at which technology really enhances the learning experience for students and has the greatest impact. Through the use of technology, educators are able to design tasks that were previously impossible.
  • Example: like before, learners may be collaborating on a document in Pages. However, this time the end product will be uploaded to a website or perhaps a class blog. Students are usually excited by the prospect of their work being on display in a classroom, so the use of a real audience is huge for them. Furthermore, this builds their literacy skills as they need to consider the audience that they’ll be writing to and adapt their work accordingly. Finally, this opens up the possibility of feedback from this global audience which they can respond to.
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    SAMR Explained with Definitions and Application Examples
Roland Gesthuizen

New Padagogy Wheel Helps You Integrate Technology Using SAMR Model - Edudemic - Edudemic - 186 views

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    "Sometimes a visual guide comes along and it just makes total sense. That's how I felt about Allan Carrington's clever 'Padagogy Wheel' which we featured on Edudemic last week. Check out the previous version then view the one below to see the differences. From what I can tell, putting the wheel on this site has generated a bit of buzz and I'm glad we could help spread the knowledge. "
Sasha Thackaberry

SAMR Model - Technology Is Learning - 72 views

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    Great examples for the SAMR model.
Amber Bridge

Technology Integration Matrix - 171 views

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    The Technology Integration Matrix (TIM) illustrates how teachers can use technology to enhance learning for K-12 students. The TIM incorporates five interdependent characteristics of meaningful learning environments: active, constructive, goal directed (i.e., reflective), authentic, and collaborative (Jonassen, Howland, Moore, & Marra, 2003). The TIM associates five levels of technology integration (i.e., entry, adoption, adaptation, infusion, and transformation) with each of the five characteristics of meaningful learning environments. Together, the five levels of technology integration and the five characteristics of meaningful learning environments create a matrix of 25 cells.
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    Neat visualization of stages of integration, with clear characteristics/descriptors.
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