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Maggie Tsai

美国大学升学作文命题趣谈 - 白露为霜的日志 - 贝壳村 - 7 views

  • You have just completed your 300-page autobiography. Please submit Page 217. (UPenn, 2009)
  • 这篇作文的目的是看学生对自己的人生有没有什么规划。任何大学都希望自己的学生和校友成功,而有雄心有计划的人成功的可能性会更高一些。这个题目并不难写,如果你想当导演,第217页可能是写你在奥斯卡奖颁奖仪式上焦急地等待结果;如果你想从政,第217页可能是写到你作为新科参议员视察飓风袭击后的灾区的情景。写什么都可以,你的想象力是唯一的障碍。如果你说我不知道我想做什么(这也常见),那就编一个,没人会找你算账的。最后别忘记提到你在宾大接受的教育在你成功中起到的作用,这样你就给大学一个录取你的好理由。
  • Using the quotation below as a jumping off point, tell us about an event or experience that helped you define one of your values or changed how you approach the world.     "Some questions cannot be answered./ They become familiar weights in the hand,/ Round stones pulled from the pocket, unyielding and cool."
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  • 如果你想知道普林斯顿到底喜欢什么样的人,从这个题目应该可以看出点端倪 – 有思想而且执著的人。这首诗到底在说啥,怎样才能起跳?有些人可能有这样的经历,他看到了一件事,读了一本书,有一个哲学问题等等,以后就一直放不下。因为挥之不去,就变成了他的一个负担,坚硬而冰凉。没有?那你太幸福了,也许你就不该写这个题目。如果有这种经历,你或许能写出一篇很出彩的文章,展示你的思想的深度和敏锐度。要注意的是重点不在这个事件的本身,更重要的是后来呢?它是怎样改变了你的,而你又做了些什么呢?
  • Stanford students possess an intellectual vitality. Reflect on an idea or experience that has been important to your intellectual development.
  • In short, we are looking for the thinking student who has a passion for learning.
  • 斯坦福想看到的是不但有好奇心,能在饭桌上进行热烈的讨论,而且能进一步把它变成一个研究课题的学生。如果学生拥有对扩展自己智能空间的激情,能量,主动性和真正的兴趣,这个题目不难。这些特质一定会某方面展露出来的
Kate Pok

Writing in College - 1. Some crucial differences between high school and college writing - 55 views

  • you will be asked to analyze the reading, to make a worthwhile claim about it that is not obvious (state a thesis means almost the same thing), to support your claim with good reasons, all in four or five pages that are organized to present an argument .
  • They expect to see a claim that would encourage them to say, "That's interesting. I'd like to know more."
  • They expect to see evidence, reasons for your claim, evidence that would encourage them to agree with your claim, or at least to think it plausible.
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  • They expect to see that you've thought about limits and objections to your claim.
  • This kind of argument is less like disagreeable wrangling, more like an amiable and lively conversation with someone whom you respect and who respects you; someone who is interested in what you have to say, but will not agree with your claims just because you state them; someone who wants to hear your reasons for believing your claims and also wants to hear answers to their questions.
  • We also know that whatever it is we think, it is never the entire truth. Our conclusions are partial, incomplete, and always subject to challenge. So we write in a way that allows others to test our reasoning: we present our best thinking as a series of claims, reasons, and responses to imagined challenges, so that readers can see not only what we think, but whether they ought to agree.
  • And that's all an argument is--not wrangling, but a serious and focused conversation among people who are intensely interested in getting to the bottom of things cooperatively.
  • So your first step in writing an assigned paper occurs well before you begin writing: You must know what your instructor expects.
  • Start by looking carefully at the words of the assignment.
  • When most of your instructors ask what the point of your paper is, they have in mind something different. By "point" or "claim" (the words are virtually synonymous with thesis), they will more often mean the most important sentence that you wrote in your essay, a sentence that appears on the page, in black in white; words that you can point to, underline, send on a postcard; a sentence that sums up the most important thing you want to say as a result of your reading, thinking, research, and writing. In that sense, you might state the point of your paper as "Well, I want to show/prove/claim/argue/demonstrate (any of those words will serve to introduce the point) that "Though Falstaff seems to play the role of Hal's father, he is, in fact, acting more like a younger brother who . . . ."" If you include in your paper what appears after I want to prove that, then that's the point of your paper, its main claim that the rest of your paper supports.
  • A good point or claim typically has several key characteristics: it says something significant about what you have read, something that helps you and your readers understand it better; it says something that is not obvious, something that your reader didn't already know; it is at least mildly contestable, something that no one would agree with just by reading it; it asserts something that you can plausibly support in five pages, not something that would require a book.
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    great guide to college writing- print out and give out to students.
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