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H DeWaard

The Pedagogy Project | HASTAC - 45 views

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    shaking up the syllabus, projects and assessments to change how courses are designed and delivered in higher ed
alexis alexander

How to Save College | The Awl - 23 views

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    "I wrote a thing last fall about massive open online courses (MOOCs, in the parlance), and the challenge that free or cheap online classes pose to business as usual in higher ed. In that piece, I compared the people running colleges today to music industry executives in the age of Napster. (This was not a flattering comparison.) Aaron Bady, a cultural critic and doctoral candidate at Berkeley, objected. I replied to Bady, one thing led to another, the slippery slope was slupped, and Maria Bustillos ended up refereeing the whole thing here on The Awl."
Chema Falcó

Eric Mazur on new interactive teaching techniques - 19 views

  • “Some people talk in their sleep. Lecturers talk while other people sleep.”
  • they create the illusion of teaching for teachers, and the illusion of learning for learners
  • Sitting passively and taking notes is just not a way of learning. Yet lectures are 99 percent of how we teach!
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  • Websites and laptops have been around for years now, but we haven’t fully thought through how to integrate them with teaching so as to conceive of courses differently.
  • “In the standard approach, the emphasis in class is on the first, and the second is left to the student on his or her own, outside of the classroom
  • you have to flip that, and put the first one outside the classroom, and the second inside
  • We have to train people to tackle situations they have not encountered before. Most instructors avoid this like the plague, because the students dislike it. Even at Harvard, we tend to keep students in their comfort zone. The first step in developing those skills is stepping into unknown territory.
  • hey’d much rather sit there and listen and take notes. Some will say, ‘I didn’t pay $47,000 to learn it all from the textbook. I think you should go over the material from the book, point by point, in class.’
  • It’s no accident that most elementary schools are organized that way.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Sadly, many aren't
  • But ultimately, learning is a social experience.
  • Perhaps the key is to coax students not only out of their rooms, but into each other’s minds.
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    Great article that brings added depth to the notion of flipped classroom and what we've always know to be great teaching/pedagogy/andragogy
D. S. Koelling

A Perfect Storm in Undergraduate Education, Part I - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher E... - 40 views

  • at least 45 percent of undergraduates demonstrated "no improvement in critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing skills in the first two years of college, and 36 percent showed no progress in four years."
  • What good does it do to increase the number of students in college if the ones who are already there are not learning much? Would it not make more sense to improve the quality of education before we increase the quantity of students?
  • students in math, science, humanities, and social sciences—rather than those in more directly career-oriented fields—tend to show the most growth in the areas measured by the Collegiate Learning Assessment, the primary tool used in their study. Also, students learn more from professors with high expectations who interact with them outside of the classroom. If you do more reading, writing, and thinking, you tend to get better at those things, particularly if you have a lot of support from your teachers.
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  • Increasingly, undergraduates are not prepared adequately in any academic area but often arrive with strong convictions about their abilities.
  • It has become difficult to give students honest feedback.
  • As the college-age population declines, many tuition-driven institutions struggle to find enough paying customers to balance their budgets. That makes it necessary to recruit even more unprepared students, who then must be retained, shifting the burden for academic success away from the student and on to the teacher.
  • Although a lot of emphasis is placed on research on the tenure track, most faculty members are not on that track and are retained on the basis of what students think of them.
  • Students gravitate to lenient professors and to courses that are reputedly easy, particularly in general education.
  • It is impossible to maintain high expectations for long unless everyone holds the line in all comparable courses—and we face strong incentives not to do that.
  • Formerly, full-time, tenured faculty members with terminal degrees and long-term ties to the institution did most of the teaching. Such faculty members not only were free to grade honestly and teach with conviction but also had a deep understanding of the curriculum, their colleagues, and the institutional mission. Now undergraduate teaching relies primarily on graduate students and transient, part-time instructors on short-term contracts who teach at multiple institutions and whose performance is judged almost entirely by student-satisfaction surveys.
  • Contingent faculty members, who are paid so little, routinely teach course loads that are impossible to sustain without cutting a lot of corners.
  • Many colleges are now so packed with transient teachers, and multitasking faculty-administrators, that it is impossible to maintain some kind of logical development in the sequencing of courses.
  • Students may be enjoying high self-esteem, but college teachers seem to be suffering from a lack of self-confidence.
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    So many issues here to deal with. Good read.
Steve Ransom

Wake Up and Smell the New Epistemology - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher... - 32 views

  • Good pedagogy is the product of instructors who respect, understand, and creatively engage their students.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Hear hear!
  • make transparent
  • I am asking instructors to see the two questions that the new epistemology emblazons across the front of every classroom — "So what?" and "Who cares?" — and then to adjust their teaching accordingly.
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  • show no patience for lectures
  • Good pedagogy is the product of instructors who respect, understand, and creatively engage their students.
  • except for the occasional late bloomer, we fail miserably at creating sustained intellectual fires among the vast majority of our practical, credential-driven students.
  • better and more widely achievable educational goal should therefore be to inculcate a respect for learning and the pursuit of knowledge.
  • public scholarship
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    An excellent read for those interested... and those who need a kick in the pants re: engaging meaningfully a new culture of students, especially in higher education.
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