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Sharin Tebo

Teaching Metacognition - 75 views

  • Step 1: Teach students that the ability to learn is not a fixed quantity

    The key to a student's ability to become a self-regulated (i.e., metacognitive) learner is understanding that one's ability to learn is a skill that develops over time rather than a fixed trait, inherited at birth.

    • Sharin Tebo
       
      Carol Dweck's book on having a Growth Mindset comes to mind here...
  • Step 2: Teach students how to set goals and plan to meet them
  • Step 3: Give students opportunities to practice self-monitoring and adapting

    Accurate self-monitoring is quite difficult.

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  • In particular, students are encouraged to think about the key points of the lecture as they listen and take notes. At the end of the lecture, students write what they think the three most important ideas of the lecture were on an index card.
  • Example: lecture wrappers
  • Teaching Self-Monitoring Strategies

    Monitoring and adapting strategies can be taught as learning habits. A wrapper is one tool for teaching self-monitoring behavior. A wrapper is an activity that surrounds an existing assignment or activity and encourages metacognition. For example, wrappers can be used with lectures, homework assignments, or exams. Wrappers require just a few extra minutes of time, but can have a big impact.

  • Example: homework wrappers

    Before beginning a homework assignment, students answer a brief set of self-assessment questions focusing on skills they should be monitoring. Students complete the homework as usual, and then answer a follow-up set of self-assessment questions.

  • Example: exam wrappers

    When graded exams are returned (as soon as possible after the exam was given), students complete an exam reflection sheet. They describe their study strategies, analyze the mistakes they made, and plan their study strategies for the next exam.

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    "Metacognition is a critically important, yet often overlooked component of learning. Effective learning involves planning and goal-setting, monitoring one's progress, and adapting as needed. All of these activities are metacognitive in nature. By teaching students these skills - all of which can be learned - we can improve student learning. There are three critical steps to teaching metacognition:"
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    Really useful reminder of how we need to address very basic ideas about how to absorb new information and ask students to self-monitor and push themselves. I appreciated the information and plan to incorporate the wrappers!
Amy Roediger

Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium Practice Test - 91 views

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    Here are some practice sample items that are worth checking out to prepare students for the next generation assessments for the Common Core.
Roland Gesthuizen

T is for teaching - 27 views

  • He points out it is not just schools that block social media; many workplaces do so also. ''The safety and wellbeing of every student is a primary concern for schools and systems, and we shouldn't misinterpret good intentions around this.''
  • schools shouldn't underestimate the fact students are accessing social media on their phones at school anyway
  • Twitter encourages students to respond to each other's questions rather than accept he is the only one with the answers
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  • We have to tame social media to use it to advantage kids' learning
  • It's truly important that teachers today have a really good understanding of how young people learn, play and socialise outside their formal classroom
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    "CAMPBELL Walsh was sick of waiting for his NAPLAN test results. ''I wanted to know how I'd done. It had already been about four months and I still hadn't got the results,'' says the year 5 student from Aitken Creek Primary in the outer Melbourne suburb of Craigieburn.

    "
Roland Gesthuizen

New Study Shows Irrelevance of Gains on State Tests. UPDATE! « Diane Ravitch'... - 40 views

  • When students are prepped and prepped and prepped to pass the state tests, they aren’t necessarily better educated, just prepared to take a specific test. Too much prepping distorts the value of the test.

  • aren’t
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    "An important new study  by Professors Adam Maltese of Indiana University and Craig Hochbein of the University of Louisville sheds new light on the validity of state scores. This study found that rising scores on the state tests did not correlate with improved performance on the ACT. In fact, students at "declining" schools did just as well and sometimes better than students where the scores were going up."
Phillip Long

Stagnant Future, Stagnant Tests: Pointed Response to NY Times "Grading the Digital Scho... - 72 views

Glenda Baker

U.S. Plans Major Changes in How Students Are Tested - NYTimes.com - 1 views

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    Predictions for big changes starting by 2012 for standardized testing - only a year away!
Javier E

The Decline of Final Exams - NYTimes.com - 52 views

  • Keith O’Brien surveys a national decline in final exams, reflected at Harvard, where fewer than a quarter of the undergraduate courses scheduled the tests in the spring term last year.
  • There’s nothing magical about finals, Bangert-Drowns added. They can be arbitrary and abstract — an inauthentic gauge of what someone knows.
  • many still find value in the final exam. It might be stressful, even terrifying, but it has the singular power to force students to go back over material, think critically about what they have read, review hard-to-grasp-topics once more, and even talk about the subject matter with classmates and instructors — all of which enhance learning.
Steve Ransom

Pedagogy of Fear - Guest Post by Morna M. Mcdermott « Cooperative Catalyst - 72 views

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    An important post. Related to how technology goes under-used, misused, and used primarily to "deliver" instruction a la BrainPop, Khan Academy,....
Steve Ransom

The Associated Press: Japan fattens textbooks to reverse sliding rank - 9 views

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    Alarmed that its children are falling behind those in rivals such as South Korea and Hong Kong, Japan is adding about 1,200 pages to elementary school textbooks. The textbooks across all subjects for six years of elementary school now total about 4,900 pages, and will go up to nearly 6,100.
Steve Ransom

Bridging Differences: Should Teacher Evaluation Depend on Student Test Scores? - 19 views

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    Great blog post by Diane Ravitch
Steve Ransom

Bridging Differences: Lies, Damn Lies, and Statistics - 1 views

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    As it happened, New York state just released the results of its annual tests of English language arts and mathematics, and the scores soared across the state to an extent that was literally unbelievable.
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