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Matt Renwick

http://carnegie.org/fileadmin/Media/Publications/WritingToRead_01.pdf - 34 views

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    Writing to Read: Evidence for How Writing Can Improve Reading
Karen Van Vliet

Games in Education - 80 views

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    Gaming is the newest trend in education, but what resources are there for teachers? This website is a storehouse of gaming resources and research to support this popular way of learning.
Don Doehla

The Importance of Fluency and Automaticity for Efficient Reading - 43 views

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    The reading process involves two separate but highly interrelated areas - word identification and comprehension. It is well established that difficulties in automatic word recognition significantly affect a reader's ability to effectively comprehend what they are reading (Lyon, 1995; Torgeson, Rashotte, and Alexander, 2001). Even mild difficulties in word identification can pull attention away from the underlying meaning, reduce the speed of reading, and create the need to reread selections to grasp the meaning. Many students who struggle to learn to read are able, with appropriate instruction, to compensate for initial reading problems by becoming accurate decoders but fail to reach a level of sufficient fluency to become fast and efficient readers. Thus, the development of techniques for improving automaticity and fluency is critical. Although the research is clear that a systematic alphabetic approach to teaching beginning readers is more effective than a whole word approach (Adams, 1990; Chall, 1996; Snow, Burns and Griffin, 1009), the most effect ways to develop fluency are less well understood.
Gerald Carey

The KYVL for Kids Research Portal - How to do research Home Base - 3 views

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    Mainly for younger children but I think it would work for middle school.
    The good thing about it is that each step has a link that explains the step in more detail.
Don Doehla

Knowledge in Action: "AP+" Project: Research on a Project-Based Learning Approach to AP... - 25 views

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    Knowledge in Action, AP+Project-Research-a #PBL Approach to #AP via @Edutopia http://ow.ly/mi8gB #actfl #langchat @ascd @biepbl #pblchat
Thieme Hennis

mLearning Guide - 2 views

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    very good guide on developing mobile learning solutions. rich resource
Michael Ashley

100 Search Engines For Academic Research - 10 views

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    A collection of different search engines and a description of what they are good for
Marc Hamlin

Reintroducing students to Research - 144 views

  • First, we think research, broadly defined, is a valuable part of an undergraduate education. Even at a rudimentary level, engaging in research implicates students in the creation of knowledge. They need to understand that knowledge isn’t an inert substance they passively receive, but is continually created, debated, and reformulated—and they have a role to play in that process.
  • we recognize that research is situated in disciplinary frameworks and needs to be addressed in terms of distinct research traditions.
  • research is a complex and recursive process involving not just finding information but framing and refining a question, perhaps gathering primary data through field or lab work, choosing and evaluating appropriate evidence, negotiating different viewpoints, and composing some kind of response, all activities that are not linear but intertwined.
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  • learning to conduct inquiry is itself complex and recursive. These skills need to be developed throughout a research project and throughout a student’s education.
  • the hybrid nature of libraries today requires students to master both traditional and emerging information formats, but the skills that students need to conduct effective inquiry—for example, those mentioned in your mission statement of reading critically and reasoning analytically—are the same whether the materials they use are in print or electronic.
  • Too often, traditional research paper assignments defeat their own purpose by implying that research is not discovery, but rather a report on what someone else has already discovered. More than once I’ve had to talk students out of abandoning a paper topic because, to their dismay, they find out it’s original. If they can’t find a source that says for them exactly what they want to say—better yet, five sources—they think they’ll get in trouble.
  • In reality, students doing researched writing typically spend a huge percentage of their time mapping out the research area before they can focus their research question. This is perfectly legitimate, though they often feel they’re spinning wheels. They have to do a good bit of reading before they really know what they’re looking for.
  • she has students seek out both primary and secondary sources, make choices among them, and develop some conclusions in presentations that are far from standard literary criticism. One lab focuses on collecting and seeking relationships among assigned literary texts and other primary sources from the second half of the twentieth century to illuminate American society in that time period.
  • For this lab, groups of students must find ten primary sources that relate in some way to literary texts under discussion and then—here’s the unusual bit—write three new verses of “America the Beautiful” that use the primary sources to illuminate a vision of American society. Instead of amber waves of grain and alabaster cities, they select images that reformulate the form of the song to represent another vision of the country. At the end of the course, her final essay assignment calls upon all of the work the previous labs have done, asking students to apply the skills they’ve practiced through the semester. While students in this course don’t do a single, big research project, they practice skills that will prepare them to do more sophisticated work later.
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    What are our assumptions about how students get research done in the humanities? How do those assumptions affect our instruction, and what really is our students' approach to research?
Thieme Hennis

Seven Interesting and Different Slidedecks on #Gamification | Kapp Notes - 59 views

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    9 deck slides about gamification. Very interesting and worthwhile
Tonya Thomas

eLearning Guild Research: What Are the Benefits of Social Learning? by Patti Shank : Le... - 17 views

  • “zone of proximal development” (ZPD)
  • Consider for a moment the repercussions, for example, of helping people in your workplace get up to speed on a new system implementation.
  • This is expensive, of course. But even more problematic, it’s likely that the classes would be held prior to the implementation, and then people would forget much of what they learned by the time the implementation occurred
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  • you could try another scenario, which better fits the way people learn
  • keep a number of volunteers across the organization well trained, then provide asynchronous training and performance support tools for the new system and allow these local volunteers to support people at their site.
  • Bandura is the person whom we can credit with the actual phrase “social learning.”
Tonya Thomas

Future Work Skills 2020 - 1 views

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    "Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. More about transdisciplinarity.
    Virtual collaboration: ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. More about virtual collaboration.
    Sense-making: ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. More about sense-making.
    Social intelligence: ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. More about social intelligence.
    Cross-cultural competency: ability to operate in different cultural settings. More about cross-cultural competency.
    Cognitive load management: ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques. More about cognitive load management.
    Novel and adaptive thinking: proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. More about novel and adaptive thinking.
    Computational thinking: ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning. More about computational thinking.
    New media literacy: ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. More about new media literacy. More about new media literacy.
    Design mindset: ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. More about design mindset."
Marc Patton

The Florida Center for Reading Research - 68 views

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    Has free teaching resources - aligned with CCSS
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    research on reading, reading growth, reading assessment, and reading instruction that will contribute to the scientific knowledge of reading and benefit students in Florida and throughout the nation
Sara Stanley

Center on Instruction - 74 views

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    Welcome to the Center on Instruction, your gateway to a cutting-edge collection of scientifically based research and information on K-12 instruction in reading, math, science, special education, and English language learning. Part of the Comprehensive Center network, the Center on Instruction is one of five content centers serving as resources for the 16 regional U.S.
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