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Jennie Snyder

How 21st Century Thinking Is Just Different - 2 views

  • nstead, we might consider constant reflection guided by important questions as a new way to learn in the presence of information abundance.
  • There is more information available to any student with a smartphone than an entire empire would have had access to three thousand years ago.
  • Truth may not change, but information does. And in the age of social media, it divides and duplicates in a frenzied kind of digital mitosis.
  • ...13 more annotations...
  • new habits of mind.
  • Persisting.
  • Managing impulsivity.
  • Responding with awe.
  • Questioning.
  • Innovating.
  • Thinking interdependently.
  • This hints at the concept not so much of student motivation, but student impetus.
  • the 21st century’s model is form and interdependence.
  • How the Habits of Mind develop is not as simple as merely naming them.
  • It is one thing to remind little Johnny to persist in the face of adversity. It is another to create consistent reasons and opportunities for him to do so, and nurturing it all with modeling, resources, and visible relevance.
  • The tone of thinking in the 21st century should not be hushed nor gushing, defiant nor assimilating, but simply interdependent, conjured to function on a relevant scale within a much larger human and intellectual ecology
  • The shift towards the fluid, formless nature of information—thinking of information as a kind of perpetually oozing honey that holds variable value rather than static silhouettes and typesets that is right or wrong—is a not a small one.
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    How 21st C really is different. Think differently.
Nadjib Aktouf

NZ Interface Magazine | Eight habits of highly effective 21st century teachers - 6 views

  • 4. Taking risksThere’s so much to learn. How can you as an educator know all these things? You must take risks and sometimes surrender yourself to the students’ knowledge. Have a vision of what you want and what the technology can achieve, identify the goals and facilitate the learning. Use the strengths of the digital natives to understand and navigate new products, have them teach each other. Trust your students.
    • jordyn bibiloni
       
      I see this so much in those teachers who are afraid to miss a day of class if something doesn't work as planned. Years go by, and all those neat lessons they'd like to do, remain untried. Teachers end up disappointed they weren't able to update their teachings, and students are disappointed with the redundant, "safe" lessons.
    • John Evans
       
      We all need to take little risks each day in how we teach. Reach out try something new, how else will we grow in our practice. Darren Kuropatwa says it best in his Awakening Posibilities Presentation: 5 Minutes to Make a Difference - http://lwictpln2009.wikispaces.com/Professional+Learning "No such thing as Best Practice, it's all Beta practice!" John Evans
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    8 habits to pick up... #2 is probably the most difficult, and #4 reminds me of those teachers who just can't "seem to find the time" to take a chance and try something new.
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    8 habits to pick up... #2 is probably the most difficult, and #4 reminds me of those teachers who just can't "seem to find the time" to take a chance and try something new.
Teresa Ilgunas

21st Century Literacies: Tools for Reading the World - 3 views

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    Wow, this is a PRACTICAL guide to info literacy, from step by step on how to read a website, to how students report the info. FULL of information I can use in my classroom without having to reinvent the wheel myself!
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