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Julie Lindsay

Digital Citizenship Pinterest - 1 views

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    Edutopia and Common Sense media have teamed up to bring these resources for digital citizenship
Julie Lindsay

Pause and Think Online - YouTube - 0 views

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    A wonderful video from @commonsensemedia for younger students to help think about using the Internet sensibly.
Julie Lindsay

Raising Digital Citizens - 0 views

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    Great Pinterest!
Julie Lindsay

Changing the Conversation: Youth and Social Media - 0 views

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    An excellent list of resources shared via this blog post.
Vicki Davis

Digiteen - Group | Diigo - 0 views

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    Digiteen Diigo group that we use with our students on the digital citizenship project. The 9 aspects of digital citizenship correspond with the 9 aspects from Mike Ribble and Gerald Bailey's Digital Citizenship in schools.
Vicki Davis

Goodreads | When Marion Copied:: Learning about Plagiarism by Brook Berg - Reviews, Dis... - 1 views

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    Some teachers recommended the book "When Marion Copied" for teaching kids about plaigarism in elementary.
Vicki Davis

10 Ways To Use Avatars In Education | Digital Learning Environments - 0 views

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    If you can't use photos, avatars are a great replacement. Here are some suggestions for how to use avatars.
Julie Lindsay

FTC Strengthens Kids' Privacy, Gives Parents Greater Control Over Their Information By ... - 0 views

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    Changes coming for the COPPA law
Julie Lindsay

Overexposed by Nicholas Chen and Edan Freiberger - YouTube - 2 views

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    Just caught up with this video today - another great way to start the conversation about our online life with students.
Vicki Davis

How journalists can avoid getting fooled by fake Hurricane Sandy photos | Poynter. - 0 views

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    With so many sharing photos about the storm, here's an excellent article on how to make sure photos are real. This would be a great exercise to do with your students who are in school to talk about the veracity of pictures.
Julie Lindsay

The Teacher's Guide To Digital Citizenship | Edudemic - 1 views

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    "The Teacher's Guide To Digital Citizenship"
Haley M

Justin, Demi, Selena, Rihanna - and COPPA | BCP Business Center - 1 views

  • Justin, Demi, Selena, Rihanna - and COPPA

    It's not likely we'll succumb to Bieber Fever.  We're of a generation more susceptible to the Rockin' Pneumonia and the Boogie Woogie Flu.  But a company that ran official fan websites for pop stars may be feeling the effects of an FTC law enforcement action alleging violations of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act and COPPA Rule.

    The defendant, Artist Arena, operated authorized sites for Justin Bieber, Demi Lovato, Selena Gomez, and the mononymous recording artist Rihanna.  (It is, too, a word.  Ask Cher or Fabio.)  Visitors to BieberFever.com, DemiLovatoFanClub.net, SelenaGomez.com, or RihannaNow.com could join fan clubs and subscribe to online newsletters.  Fan club members also had access to social networking functions, like creating personal profiles, posting on walls, or "friending" other members.  Of course, to take advantage of those features, people had to provide personal information.

    The details of the registration process varied depending on the site, so you'll want to read the complaint for the specifics.  But the 25-words-or-less summary is that Artist Arena allegedly collected kids' names, addresses, email addresses, birthdates, gender and other info without properly notifying parents and getting their consent.  According to the complaint, the company violated COPPA by knowingly registering over 25,000 kids under 13 and collected and maintained personal information from almost 75,000 other kids under 13 who started the sign-up process, but didn't finish it.

    What about Artist Arena's promises that it wouldn't collect children's personal information or activate kids' registrations without parental consent?  The FTC challenged those claims as false.

    The settlement imposes a $1 million civil penalty, bars future COPPA violations, and requires the company  to delete the information collected illegally.

    Looking for specifics on COPPA compliance?  Visit the BCP Business Center's Children's Privacy page.

     

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    This Justin Beiber fan site has been penalized more than $100,000 for collecting emails of minors under 13 without parental permission. COPPA compliance is more important than ever. I find it ironic that kids under 13 aren't even supposed to be able to have emails in the first place on many websites.

    "The details of the registration process varied depending on the site, so you'll want to read the complaint for the specifics. But the 25-words-or-less summary is that Artist Arena allegedly collected kids' names, addresses, email addresses, birthdates, gender and other info without properly notifying parents and getting their consent. According to the complaint, the company violated COPPA by knowingly registering over 25,000 kids under 13 and collected and maintained personal information from almost 75,000 other kids under 13 who started the sign-up process, but didn't finish it."
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    This is important and why kids under 13 cannot get on most social media websites.
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    This article is about kids that obtain info for personal websites without properly notifying parents and getting their consent.
Vicki Davis

Regulators shut down global PC 'tech support' scam | Politics and Law - CNET News - 0 views

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    Scareware. Yes, it is a term. Scaring people into thinking they have a virus. Knowledge is power and it will also save you money. Being educated about computers pays over your life. It is time for all of us to be educated and savvy. I know someone taken by this scam.

    "English-speaking consumers in the United States, Canada, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, and the U.K. were targeted in the global scam, regulators said. Most of the scammers were based in India, but some also came from the U.S. and U.K.
    The scam involved cold callers who claimed to work for major technology companies, such as Microsoft or Google, and who told consumers they had viruses on their PCs, according to regulators. The callers would attempt to dupe users into giving them remote access to their computers, locking the user out while attempting to "fix" the malware that the scammer claimed was on the machine."
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