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Barbara Lindsey

What's Next After Web 2.0? - 0 views

  • Mark Johnson, Powerset/Microsoft Program Manager, commented that "the next era of the Web will represent greater understanding of computers." He went on to suggest that "if Web 1.0 was about Read and Web 2.0 was about Read/Write, then Web 3.0 should be about Read/Write/Understand." Specifically he said that "a computer that can understand should be able to: find us information that we care about better (e.g., smart news alerts), make intelligent recommendations for us (e.g., implicit recommendations based on our reading/surfing/buying behavior), aggregate and simplify information. . . and probably lots of other things that we haven't yet imagined, since our computers are still pretty dumb."
  • Aziz Poonawalla said "folksonomy, leveraged en masse, could render algorithmic search obsolete. you get Semantic web almost for free."
  • Education is one area ripe for Web innovation. Harley of WorldLearningTree recently submitted his suggestions on how to revolutionalize online education to Google's "Project10ToThe100" contest.
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  • Sandra Foyt is looking for a "better learning/connecting hub". She elaborates: "I want a command center where it's easy to share all kinds of digital media, while being able to chat or microblog. An all in one home base, with Twitter/Flock/Ning/Wiki/Flickr/YouTube elements."
  • Jorge Escobar said that the next era will be "Web Real World" - by which he meant "offline activities driven by Web services (geoloc, mobile, niche)".
  • Two trends of the current era are the increasing internationalization of the Web and mobile products like iPhone and Android becoming more prominent. It almost goes without saying that both of these things will become more prevelant over the coming years - and indeed both depend on the other...
  • The jury is still out on whether web 2.0 has officially ended. Of course the web is iterative and so version numbers don't really mean anything. But even so we may see more of a focus on 'real world' problems from now on and a move away from consumer apps as the primary focus.
Michael Johnson

E-Learning 2.0 ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes - 20 views

  • In general, where we are now in the online world is where we were before the beginning of e-learning [1]. Traditional theories of distance learning, of (for example) transactional distance, as described by Michael G. Moore, have been adapted for the online world. Content is organized according to this traditional model and delivered either completely online or in conjunction with more traditional seminars, to cohorts of students, led by an instructor, following a specified curriculum to be completed at a predetermined pace.
  • networked markets
  • In learning, these trends are manifest in what is sometimes called "learner-centered" or "student-centered" design. This is more than just adapting for different learning styles or allowing the user to change the font size and background color; it is the placing of the control of learning itself into the hands of the learner
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  • creation, communication and participation playing key roles
  • The breaking down of barriers has led to many of the movements and issues we see on today's Internet. File-sharing, for example, evolves not of a sudden criminality among today's youth but rather in their pervasive belief that information is something meant to be shared. This belief is manifest in such things as free and open-source software, Creative Commons licenses for content, and open access to scholarly and other works. Sharing content is not considered unethical; indeed, the hoarding of content is viewed as antisocial [9]. And open content is viewed not merely as nice to have but essential for the creation of the sort of learning network described by Siemens [10].
  • "Enter Web 2.0, a vision of the Web in which information is broken up into "microcontent" units that can be distributed over dozens of domains. The Web of documents has morphed into a Web of data. We are no longer just looking to the same old sources for information. Now we're looking to a new set of tools to aggregate and remix microcontent in new and useful ways"
  • Web 2.0 is not a technological revolution, it is a social revolution.
  • It also begins to look like a personal portfolio tool [18]. The idea here is that students will have their own personal place to create and showcase their own work. Some e-portfolio applications, such as ELGG, have already been created. IMS Global as put together an e-portfolio specification [19]. "The portfolio can provide an opportunity to demonstrate one's ability to collect, organize, interpret and reflect on documents and sources of information. It is also a tool for continuing professional development, encouraging individuals to take responsibility for and demonstrate the results of their own learning" [20].
    • Michael Johnson
       
      Also a place to receive and give feedback. I believe that one of the things that learners need to have to be prepared for learning in this space (social media or web 2.0) is the ability to evaluate, to give good feedback. Additionally, to be able to receive feedback constructively.
  • In the world of e-learning, the closest thing to a social network is a community of practice, articulated and promoted by people such as Etienne Wenger in the 1990s. According to Wenger, a community of practice is characterized by "a shared domain of interest" where "members interact and learn together" and "develop a shared repertoire of resources."
  • Yahoo! Groups
  • Blogging is very different from traditionally assigned learning content. It is much less formal. It is written from a personal point of view, in a personal voice. Students' blog posts are often about something from their own range of interests, rather than on a course topic or assigned project. More importantly, what happens when students blog, and read reach others' blogs, is that a network of interactions forms-much like a social network, and much like Wenger's community of practice.
    • Michael Johnson
       
      So, I believe he is saying that virtual communities of practice that form naturally are more real and approach what Wenger was talking about better than contrived "communities" put together in classes. That may be true. but does it have to be? If people come together to with a common purpose and the instructor allows the students freedom to explore what is important to them then I would hope that this kind of community can develop even in formal educational settings. Relevance is a key issue here!
  • "We're talking to the download generation," said Peter Smith, associate dean, Faculty of Engineering. "Why not have the option to download information about education and careers the same way you can download music? It untethers content from the Web and lets students access us at their convenience." Moreover, using an online service such as Odeo, Blogomatrix Sparks, or even simply off-the-shelf software, students can create their own podcasts.
  • Web 2.0 is not a technological revolution, it is a social revolution. "Here's my take on it: Web 2.0 is an attitude not a technology. It's about enabling and encouraging participation through open applications and services. By open I mean technically open with appropriate APIs but also, more importantly, socially open, with rights granted to use the content in new and exciting contexts"
  • The e-learning application, therefore, begins to look very much like a blogging tool. It represents one node in a web of content, connected to other nodes and content creation services used by other students. It becomes, not an institutional or corporate application, but a personal learning center, where content is reused and remixed according to the student's own needs and interests. It becomes, indeed, not a single application, but a collection of interoperating applications—an environment rather than a system.
  • This approach to learning means that learning content is created and distributed in a very different manner. Rather than being composed, organized and packaged, e-learning content is syndicated, much like a blog post or podcast. It is aggregated by students, using their own personal RSS reader or some similar application. From there, it is remixed and repurposed with the student's own individual application in mind, the finished product being fed forward to become fodder for some other student's reading and use.
    • Michael Johnson
       
      I like the idea of students passing on their work to be fodder for someone else's learning. In this way we change to from a learner to a learner/teacher! (See Dillon Inouye's work and Comments from John Seeley Brown)
  • More formally, instead of using enterprise learning-management systems, educational institutions expect to use an interlocking set of open-source applications. Work on such a set of applications has begun in a number of quarters, with the E-Learning Framework defining a set of common applications and the newly formed e-Framework for Education and Research drawing on an international collaboration. While there is still an element of content delivery in these systems, there is also an increasing recognition that learning is becoming a creative activity and that the appropriate venue is a platform rather than an application.
    • Michael Johnson
    • Michael Johnson
       
      Jon Mott has some cool ideas related to this paragraph.
  • Words are only meaningful when they can be related to experiences," said Gee. If I say "I spilled the coffee," this has a different meaning depending on whether I ask for a broom or a mop. You cannot create that context ahead of time— it has to be part of the experience.
  • game "modding" allows players to make the game their own
  • he most important learning skills that I see children getting from games are those that support the empowering sense of taking charge of their own learning. And the learner taking charge of learning is antithetical to the dominant ideology of curriculum design
  • The challenge will not be in how to learn, but in how to use learning to create something more, to communicate.
    • Michael Johnson
       
      I still think part of the challenge is how to learn. How to wade through a sea of all that is out there and "learn from the best" that is available. Find, organize, evaluate, analyze, synthesize, as well as create. I agree with Chris Lott (@fncll) that creativity is vital! (I am just not so sure that it is a non-starter to say that we should be moral first...though it could be argued that we should become moral through the creative process).
  • "ubiquitous computing."
  • what this means is having learning available no matter what you are doing.
  • A similar motivation underlies the rapidly rising domain of mobile learning [24]—for after all, were the context in which learning occurs not important, it would not be useful or necessary to make learning mobile. Mobile learning offers not only new opportunities to create but also to connect. As Ellen Wagner and Bryan Alexander note, mobile learning "define(s) new relationships and behaviors among learners, information, personal computing devices, and the world at large"
  • And what people were doing with the Web was not merely reading books, listening to the radio or watching TV, but having a conversation, with a vocabulary consisting not just of words but of images, video, multimedia and whatever they could get their hands on. And this became, and looked like, and behaved like, a network.
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    Stephen Downes' take on eLearning and what the future holds
Steve Fulton

101 Web 2.0 Teaching Tools | OEDb - 1 views

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    "The following list is filled with tools that will make a teacher's life easier. The categories are listed in alphabetical order and the links to each tool are also listed alphabetically within those categories. Aggregators | Bookmark Managers | Classroom Tools | Collaboration | Course Management | Office Suites | Office Tools | Productivity | Public Content Management (Blogs, etc.) | Storage"
Soniya Patel

Joomla Community Sites Development - 0 views

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    Welcome to Joomla Web Design, we specialize in building community Websites using the powerful open source content Web system Joomla!. Joomla is an excellent open source content Web system used to make powerful community Websites. Though the process of making Joomla community site is still in its infancy, but the popularity is growing. At Joomla Web Design, we can develop a community site using different Joomla extensions.
titechnologies

Reasons why React Native Is the Future of Hybrid App Development - TI Technologies - 0 views

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    As the world of mobile apps is expanding beyond comprehension, demand for better and faster apps shoot up. We need applications that perform easily, have a magnificent look, simple to create, and can be implemented rapidly. All these necessities are difficult to satisfy as high performance, related to native apps, set aside enough time for the advancement. Then again, faster deployment, related with cross-platform applications, trade-off, no less than a bit, on performance. Therefore, aching for better languages, tools that help top-notch hybrid apps development, and frameworks keep developers on their toes. One such resolution, which quickly changing the universe of versatile applications is Facebook's React Native. It is a JavaScript library to assemble a UI that enables you to make versatile mobile applications and work easily as native apps. It even gives you a chance to reuse the code over the web and mobile platforms. You don't have to develop for Android and iOS, independently, as one code is sufficient for both the platforms, saving money and time. Let's look at some reasons that point towards React Native taking the center stage in the future. Supports Both iOS & Android - 'Supportive' Because of the two different operating systems which are majorly being used by the customers across the world, the primary challenge for the mobile app development companies is to choose one ahead of the other. But Facebook made it easy by introducing React Native. It supports both iOS and Android making it convenient for the app developers to use the same code for both the platforms without writing it from the scratch. Reusability for better development What makes us to state that REACTS is the eventual fate of application development? It is the reusability of the components. You don't have the web view components anymore for hybrid apps with React native. The essential code for this framework will easily be reused within the native apps, and you'll easily compile it
Kathleen Cercone

Teaching and Learning Online (28) - 1 views

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    Leading personal start page to manage your digital life. Add widget to read your newspapers, play games, watch TV, movies, listen to podcasts, manage your social networks like Facebook, MySpace, read your emails from gmail or yahoo mail.
Barbara Lindsey

Visualize your GPS tracks with Breadcrumbs | Google Earth Blog - 19 views

  • Our users can log their ski trip, hiking trip or sightseeing trip, upload it to Breadcrumbs with their photos and videos, and send it to all their friends, who can relive the adventure in 3D. And this is only the start, as we plan to provide our users with a platform to not only edit and maintain tracks, but also to find new places to explore and interact within a social network.
  • Breadcrumbs is the first web application of its kind, where users can manage GPS tracks, photos and videos in one place - it can be thought of as 'Flickr for GPS tracks'.
  • The key features of Breadcrumbs include:Relive your adventure: Breadcrumbs brings together photos, videos and GPS tracks in one quick and easy process and our 3D playback function brings the track alive. Edit and manage: Breadcrumbs comes with a suite of tools which let users edit and manage their GPS tracks, photos and videos. These include:- Automated geotagging of photos.- Track editing tool to correct GPS points.- Add information to your adventure to help tell the story, such as show where you ate your lunch or spotted some wildlife.- Organize: Breadcrumbs offers a rich set of tools to help users to manage adventures.- Share: Breadcrumbs makes it easy to share adventures, with options including a public page for each track and direct integration with Facebook.
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  • Our utilization and heavy integration with the Google Earth plugin is also a big bonus for the user. Garmin allows you to look at your data in Google Maps and indeed Google Earth. However, Breadcrumbs builds on this as we have built a track playback feature on top of the plugin which allows you to hit play and replay your trip step by step. It's like watching a movie of your day out! This really does bring the users' GPS data to life especially when sharing with friends and family.
  • We are already integrated with one smartphone application allowing the user to push their tracks directly to Breadcrumbs from their phone.
Kay Cunningham

Your Social Dashboard - 13 views

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    'free web service that enables you to aggregate and manage all your social, content, email, and RSS feeds. Your friend streams, photos, videos, and all your own updates and content in one place. You can also post to other services, send emails, aggregate all your contacts, follow other users, and much more.'
social learning

Schoology - Your Digital Classroom - 23 views

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    "Fully hosted and fully managed course management system with an integrated social network for K-12 and higher education"
Michael Johnson

Learning with 'e's: Search results for identity - 18 views

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    The Social Web is transforming the way students interact with others, and is challenging traditional pedagogies, values and practices. An analysis of students' uses of social networking tools (e.g. Facebook, Myspace) and video/photo sharing sites (e.g. YouTube, Flickr) reveals the emergence of collective digital literacies. These include filtering content, new textual and visual literacies, managing multiple digital identities, representing self in cyberspace and engaging in new modes of interaction. In this presentation I will argue that identification through digitally mediated tools has become the new cultural capital - the set of invisible bonds that ties a community together. It is this 'social glue' - such mutual understandings and exchanges that occur on a daily basis within social media - that build the digital communities, and create new learning spaces, nurturing the habitus of a new 'digital tribe'.
avivajazz  jazzaviva

Zotero |:| Next-Generation Research Tool - 1 views

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    Zotero [zoh-TAIR-oh] is a free, easy-to-use Firefox extension to help you collect, manage, and cite your research sources. It lives right where you do your work - in the web browser itself.
Susan Oxnevad

A Guide to Facilitating an Interactive Learning Project - 0 views

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    I have been creating a lot of student projects that use ThingLink as a tool for learning. I have also received a handful of of questions from teachers who are highly interested in facilitating a similiar project of their own, but need help with the management involved. "With so much active student engagement, how do you manage a project like this?"
titechnologies

THE ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF USING REACT NATIVE AS CROSS-PLATFORM APP DEVELOPMENT - TI Technologies - 0 views

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    The cross-platform app development is seemingly becoming popular as the stratum of competition is surpassing higher up the order. What's more, without any doubt, React Native has been distinguished as the most preferred cross-platform solution for the creation of both iOS and Android apps respectively. With React Native, you can work on two distinctive Operating Systems utilizing a single platform. React Native likewise demonstrates supportive in building attractive User Interfaces, which can't be recognized from a native app. The React Native might be a popular choice, however, it isn't the best decision as it has a few disadvantages also. Therefore, we would be highlighting the major advantages and disadvantages of the React Native, with the goal that you can a thought when to utilize the platform and when to maintain a strategic distance from it. Advantages of React Native Known for Optimal Performance Obviously, React Native is a genuine resource when it comes to enhancing the performances through native control and modules. The React Native gets associated with the native components for both the Operating Systems and generates a code to the native APIs upfront and freely. Presently the performance enhances because of the way that it makes utilization of a different thread from the native APIs and UI. Large Community of Developers The Fact that React Native is an open-source JavaScript platform where every developer is allowed to contribute to the framework and it's effectively accessible to all. In this way, you can take full advantage of the community-driven technology. The support of a large community is likewise valuable as it enables you to share your portfolios and experiences so that you can go for better coding. There is one platform GitHub React Native Community, which urges the developers to share their experiences at whenever point they learning something new about the React Native. They likewise get the feedback and reviews on the same establishi
Clif Mims

Lino - Online Stickes - 20 views

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    "lino is a free sticky & canvas service that requires nothing but a Web browser." -Alternative to Wallwisher
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    Offers some project management tools that Wallwisher doesn't and lets you pan around your canvas.
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    "Lino is a free sticky & canvas service that requires nothing but a Web browser."
Barbara Lindsey

My School, Meet MySpace: Social Networking at School | Edutopia - 1 views

  • Months before the newly hired teachers at Philadelphia's Science Leadership Academy (SLA) started their jobs, they began the consuming work of creating the high school of their dreams -- without meeting face to face. They articulated a vision, planned curriculum, designed assessment rubrics, debated discipline policies, and even hammered out daily schedules using the sort of networking tools -- messaging, file swapping, idea sharing, and blogging -- kids love on sites such as MySpace.
  • hen, weeks before the first day of school, the incoming students jumped onboard -- or, more precisely, onto the Science Leadership Academy Web site -- to meet, talk with their teachers, and share their hopes for their education. So began a conversation that still perks along 24/7 in SLA classrooms and cyberspace. It's a bold experiment to redefine learning spaces, the roles and relationships of teachers and students, and the mission of the modern high school.
  • When I hear people say it's our job to create the twenty-first-century workforce, it scares the hell out of me," says Chris Lehmann, SLA's founding principal. "Our job is to create twenty-first-century citizens. We need workers, yes, but we also need scholars, activists, parents -- compassionate, engaged people. We're not reinventing schools to create a new version of a trade school. We're reinventing schools to help kids be adaptable in a world that is changing at a blinding rate."
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  • It's the spirit of science rather than hardcore curriculum that permeates SLA. "In science education, inquiry-based learning is the foothold," Lehmann says. "We asked, 'What does it mean to build a school where everything is based on the core values of science: inquiry, research, collaboration, presentation, and reflection?'"
  • It means the first-year curriculum is built around essential questions: Who am I? What influences my identity? How do I interact with my world? In addition to science, math, and engineering, core courses include African American history, Spanish, English, and a basic how-to class in technology that also covers Internet safety and the ethical use of information and software. Classes focus less on facts to be memorized and more on skills and knowledge for students to master independently and incorporate into their lives. Students rarely take tests; they write reflections and do "culminating" projects. Learning doesn't merely cross disciplines -- it shatters outdated departmental divisions. Recently, for instance, kids studied atomic weights in biochemistry (itself a homegrown interdisciplinary course), did mole calculations in algebra, and created Dalton models (diagrams that illustrate molecular structures) in art.
  • This is Dewey for the digital age, old-fashioned progressive education with a technological twist.
  • computers and networking are central to learning at, and shaping the culture of, SLA. "
  • he zest to experiment -- and the determination to use technology to run a school not better, but altogether differently -- began with Lehmann and the teachers last spring when they planned SLA online. Their use of Moodle, an open source course-management system, proved so easy and inspired such productive collaboration that Lehmann adopted it as the school's platform. It's rare to see a dog-eared textbook or pad of paper at SLA; everybody works on iBooks. Students do research on the Internet, post assignments on class Moodle sites, and share information through forums, chat, bookmarks, and new software they seem to discover every day.
  • Teachers continue to use Moodle to plan, dream, and learn, to log attendance and student performance, and to talk about everything -- from the student who shows up each morning without a winter coat to cool new software for tagging research sources. There's also a schoolwide forum called SLA Talk, a combination bulletin board, assembly, PA system, and rap session.
  • Web technology, of course, can do more than get people talking with those they see every day; people can communicate with anyone anywhere. Students at SLA are learning how to use social-networking tools to forge intellectual connections.
  • In October, Lehmann noticed that students were sorting themselves by race in the lunchroom and some clubs. He felt disturbed and started a passionate thread on self-segregation.
  • "Having the conversation changed the way kids looked at themselves," he says.
  • "What I like best about this school is the sense of community," says student Hannah Feldman. "You're not just here to learn, even though you do learn a lot. It's more like a second home."
  • As part of the study of memoirs, for example, Alexa Dunn's English class read Funny in Farsi, Firoozeh Dumas's account of growing up Iranian in the United States -- yes, the students do read books -- and talked with the author in California via Skype. The students also wrote their own memoirs and uploaded them to SLA's network for the teacher and class to read and edit. Then, digital arts teacher Marcie Hull showed the students GarageBand, which they used to turn their memoirs into podcasts. These they posted on the education social-networking site EduSpaces (formerly Elgg); they also posted blogs about the memoirs.
Leslie Holwerda

New Personal Learning Networks - Stephen's Lighthouse - 0 views

  • Seek out experts on the web.
  • Filter.
  • Don’t just consume, contribute.
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  • Start following blogs you find interesting.
  • Employ a social bookmarking site.
  • Be yourself!
  • Interact with sources both big and small.
  • Join a professional social network.
  • Find a great online community.
  • Share links of interest.
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    How to! PLN development
Susan Oxnevad

3 Free Cool Tools to Curate Content - 0 views

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    Content curation is a great way to find, organize and share useful knowledge efficiently. There are many free digital tools available to help manage web content in flexible ways allowing us to quickly share resources that are accessible online. Use of curation tools is social and will connect us to the ideas of others and help build our professional learning networks.
Michael Johnson

VideoLobby.com - Create a professionally styled, custom branded webcast. - 7 views

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    Webcasting site where you can manage live questions, leveraging social networks, etc.
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