Skip to main content

Home/ Teaching and Learning with Web 2.0/ Group items matching "technology tools" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
titechnologies

Top 11 Tips to Improve AngularJS Performance - TI Technologies - 0 views

  •  
    AngularJS is made to rearrange the complex process of building and overseeing JavaScript applications. In view of the Model-View-Controller, or MVC, programming structure, AngularJS is particularly valuable for making single page web apps. Today, online businesses are enormously affected by the performance of web technologies that they use for their respective tasks. Henceforth, it winds up the importance to dive into the majority of the elements that are harming their business growth. AngularJS can rapidly be added to any HTML page with a straightforward tag. In case you're asking why you have a couple of slow pages, here are a few hints to accelerate your code. AngularJS Optimization Tips Batarang Tool to Benchmark Watchers Batarang is an awesome dev tool from the AngularJS developer that brings down your debugging efforts. In spite of the fact that it has numerous new features, some of them enable you to profile and track the execution of your AngularJS performance. In addition, the watch tree figures out which extensions are not destroyed as it is by all accounts if there is an increase in the memory. Chrome Dev Tool Profiler to Identify Performance Bottlenecks This one is a helpful device that gives you the alternative to choose which profile type you need to make. Take Heap Snapshot, Record Allocation Timeline, and Record Allocation Profile are utilized for memory profiling. After this performance improvement, your app will complete in under two seconds and clients can freely connect with it then. Limit your watchers Talking about which, whenever you introduce data-bindings, you make more $scopes and $$watchers, which drags out the digest cycle. Excessively numerous $$watchers can cause lag, so restrain their utilization as much as possible. Utilize scope.$evalAsync On the off chance that you endeavor to manually initiate the digest cycle while it's now running, you could get an error. To keep this from happening, utilize scope.$evalAsync rather than $appl
Christopher Pappas

Word Clouds in Education: Turn a toy into a tool - 0 views

  •  
    Word Clouds in Education: Turn a toy into a tool When it comes to finding the deeper meaning in a text passage, a word cloud is a simple application that you might have seen as a cute bit of fluff rather than a useful academic tool. Most word cloud programs work in the same, straight-forward way; the more a word is used in the text, the bigger it is shown in the cloud. A glance at a cloud is an easy way to preview a passage, or to analyze text. So what does this mean for your courses? http://elearningindustry.com/subjects/tools/item/375-word-clouds-in-education-turn-a-toy-into-a-tool
David Wetzel

Top 10 Online Tools for Teaching Science and Math - 2 views

  •  
    Why use Web 2.0 tools in science and math classes? The primary reason is they facilitate access to input and interaction with content through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. These tools offer enormous advantages for science and math teachers, in terms of helping their students learn using Web 2.0 tools. For example: * Most of these tools can be edited from any computer connected to the Internet. Teachers can add, edit and delete information even during class time. * Students learn how to use these tools for academic purposes and, at the same time, can transfer their use to their personal lives and future professional careers. * RSS feeds allow students to access all the desired research information on one page. * Students learn to be autonomous in their learning process.
thinksys_inc

Favorite Test Automation Tools and Technologies - 0 views

  •  
    A quick search for "Test Automation Tools" on Google returns 8,21,00,000 results. With new Tools and technologies mushrooming every single day, it is quite obvious to get confused or feel overwhelmed when it comes to selecting the right tool or Tools for your needs. No, this blog is not about recommending any particular tool or Tools.
Christopher Pappas

Classroom Technology Evolution Infographic | e-Learning Infographics - 0 views

  •  
    Classroom Technology Evolution Infographic Advances in Technology have definitely revolutionized the educational world-especially in recent decades. It seems that with each passing year, the traditional K-12 classroom is in the process of implementing a new form of Technology. The Classroom Technology Evolution Infographic presents how Technology used in the classroom has evolved. http://elearninginfographics.com/classroom-Technology-evolution-infographic/
Steve Fulton

101 Web 2.0 Teaching Tools | OEDb - 1 views

  •  
    "The following list is filled with tools that will make a teacher's life easier. The categories are listed in alphabetical order and the links to each tool are also listed alphabetically within those categories. Aggregators | Bookmark Managers | Classroom tools | Collaboration | Course Management | Office Suites | Office tools | Productivity | Public Content Management (Blogs, etc.) | Storage"
Hanna Wiszniewska

Top 10 Web 2.0 Tools for Young Learners : February 2009 : THE Journal - 2 views

  •  
    Technology needs to trickle up, she said, not down. We need to give the most powerful Technology to the most vulnerable populations because they are the ones who need it. "Young learners, non-readers," she continued, "need high-speed access, they need animation and graphics and sound. And that's the truth." According to Lovely, and education Technology consultant and speaker at the FETC 2009 conference in Orlando, FL in January, it was the recognition of those needs that led her to develop a "top 10 list" of go-to Technology Technology to help inspire young students and empower under-funded teachers. "The important thing to remember here," she said, "is that this isn't about simply providing you with 10 links. It's much more important to ask, 'What are you going to do with these things? How are you going to use these Technology?' That's why we're here," she said. "So I can show you not only what's out there but also how other educators are using these resources to teach their students right now."
Tony Rodgers

EdTech Toolbox: Top 100 Tools For Learning 2011 - 0 views

  •  
    "Great list produced every year from C4LPT - Centre for Learning and Performance Technologies. Here are the Top 100 Tools for Learning 2011. This the 5th Annual Survey of Learning Tools finalised on 13 November 2011. This year's list is compiled from the Top 10 Tools lists of 531 learning professionals worldwide - from education, training and workplace learning. "
David Wetzel

Top 5 Search Tools for Finding Flickr Images for Use in Education - 0 views

  •  
    The top five search tools for finding Flickr images are designed to help teachers and students locate just the right image for use in any subject area and project. Without these tools finding the right image on this image hosting site is often an impossible, or at least a tedious, task. The value of this site is its ability to provide digital pictures which are often impossible for a teacher to obtain any other way. Like everything else on the internet, trying to find something is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. This where the top five search tools become valuable resources for teachers and students trying to find images comes into play. These search engines are specifically designed to search the more than three billion pictures on the Flickr hosting site.
David Wetzel

6 Top Free Online Tools for Support Teaching and Learning - 1 views

  •  
    The six top free online tools were selected from available web 2.0 tools for teaching and learning using presentations, blogging, and bookmarking online resources. There are many excellent online tools available in these three categories, making the selection difficult at best. However, the selection was made based on reviewing available online resources along with other contributions and feedback from teachers.
Priscilla Ubillus

4Teacher.org - 0 views

  •  
    This is a site that works to help teachers integrate technology into their classrooms by offering online technology and resources. It is easy to locate online resources such as ready-to-use Web lessons, quizzes, rubrics and classroom calendars. There are also technology for student use. The 4Teachers Family of technology is a nice place to start looking for simple technology solutions for your students.
Christopher Pappas

Educational Video Production: When educators become Producers - 0 views

  •  
    Multimedia age has changed the role of teachers. The need for audiovisual aids to support e-learning, mobile learning, distance and blended learning have reformed the role of educators, who are now becoming producers to enrich their teaching with mediums like podcasts, videos, animations, interactive presentations.. etc. Why to use Video technology in education? Video technology has been proven to be a very powerful tool in motivating, engaging and instructing within the educational concept. Because of the advantages of transformability and transferability that video provides, has open the horizons of teaching and learning. Video can enhance the learning experience by showing places and phenomena that otherwise could not be seen, which adds "experiential value" (Koumi, 2006) in students understanding. Moreover video allows demonstration of procedural activities in detail when used for instruction and allows personal improvement as it can be a valuable tool for self-reflection.
lisa_morgan

Web 2.0 teaching tools to enhance education and learning - Edjudo - 0 views

  •  
    A comprehensive list of the best web 2.0 tools and links, sorted via category, for teaching and learning with tools. tools for 3D projects, tags, photo editing, online storage, animations, blogging and lots more
Susan Oxnevad

4 Tools to Build Academic Vocabulary - 0 views

  •  
    Technology is an effective and engaging tool that can be used to improve vocabulary acquisition for all learners and engage them in the learning process. Technology resources can provide students with a variety of multimedia content to help them construct knowledge about vocabulary in a way that meets their unique learning needs. Technology allows teachers to design learning experiences that provide students with flexible learning paths. This post will explore some digital Technology for helping students construct knowledge about vocabulary.
Christopher Pappas

List of Free Tools to Create Infographics for your Learners - 0 views

  •  
    Does your learners prefer acquiring and processing information via images, pictures, maps, graphs, charts, illustrations, and other visual aids? Since they are visual learners have you though of using infographics at your course? At the List of Free Tools to Create Infographics for your Learners you will find 22 Free Tools to help your learners acquire knowledge the "visual" way. Top 5 Advices for creating learning Infographics
Christopher Pappas

TOP 10 FREE Timeline Creation Tools for Teachers - 0 views

  •  
    "Timelines have become an indispensable part of the learning experience as they enable students to participate more actively in learning and acquire knowledge the easy way. In other words, timelines help students easily understand and memorize events and dates. But how easy it is to create them? Which are the best - and free- tools that you can use? In the following list you will find the TOP 10 FREE Timeline Creation tools for Teachers that are very effective, free and easy to use. "
Michael Johnson

Teaching in Social and Technological Networks « Connectivism - 17 views

  • The model falls apart when we distribute content and extend the activities of the teacher to include multiple educator inputs and peer-driven learning.
  • Skype brings anyone, from anywhere, into a classroom. Students are not confined to interacting with only the ideas of a researcher or theorist. Instead, a student can interact directly with researchers through Twitter, blogs, Facebook, and listservs. The largely unitary voice of the traditional teacher is fragmented by the limitless conversation opportunities available in networks. When learners have control of the tools of conversation, they also control the conversations in which they choose to engage. Course content is similarly fragmented. The textbook is now augmented with YouTube videos, online articles, simulations, Second Life builds, virtual museums, Diigo content trails, StumpleUpon reflections, and so on.
  • Traditional courses provide a coherent view of a subject. This view is shaped by “learning outcomes” (or objectives). These outcomes drive the selection of content and the design of learning activities. Ideally, outcomes and content/curriculum/instruction are then aligned with the assessment. It’s all very logical: we teach what we say we are going to teach, and then we assess what we said we would teach. This cozy comfortable world of outcomes-instruction-assessment alignment exists only in education. In all other areas of life, ambiguity, uncertainty, and unkowns reign. Fragmentation of content and conversation is about to disrupt this well-ordered view of learning. Educators and universities are beginning to realize that they no longer have the control they once (thought they) did
  • ...18 more annotations...
  • I’ve come to view teaching as a critical and needed activity in the chaotic and ambiguous information climate created by networks.
  • In networks, teachers are one node among many. Learners will, however, likely be somewhat selective of which nodes they follow and listen to. Most likely, a teacher will be one of the more prominent nodes in a learner’s network. Thoughts, ideas, or messages that the teacher amplifies will generally have a greater probability of being seen by course participants. The network of information is shaped by the actions of the teacher in drawing attention to signals (content elements) that are particularly important in a given subject area.
  • While “curator” carries the stigma of dusty museums, the metaphor is appropriate for teaching and learning. The curator, in a learning context, arranges key elements of a subject in such a manner that learners will “bump into” them throughout the course. Instead of explicitly stating “you must know this”, the curator includes critical course concepts in her dialogue with learners, her comments on blog posts, her in-class discussions, and in her personal reflections. As learners grow their own networks of understanding, frequent encounters with conceptual artifacts shared by the teacher will begin to resonate.
  • Today’s social web is no different – we find our way through active exploration. Designers can aid the wayfinding process through consistency of design and functionality across various tools, but ultimately, it is the responsibility of the individual to click/fail/recoup and continue. Fortunately, the experience of wayfinding is now augmented by social systems. Social structures are filters. As a learner grows (and prunes) her personal networks, she also develops an effective means to filter abundance. The network becomes a cognitive agent in this instance – helping the learner to make sense of complex subject areas by relying not only on her own reading and resource exploration, but by permitting her social network to filter resources and draw attention to important topics. In order for these networks to work effectively, learners must be conscious of the need for diversity and should include nodes that offer critical or antagonistic perspectives on all topic areas. Sensemaking in complex environments is a social process.
  • Aggregation should do the same – reveal the content and conversation structure of the course as it unfolds, rather than defining it in advance.
  • Filtering resources is an important educator role, but as noted already, effective filtering can be done through a combination of wayfinding, social sensemaking, and aggregation. But expertise still matters. Educators often have years or decades of experience in a field. As such, they are familiar with many of the concepts, pitfalls, confusions, and distractions that learners are likely to encounter. As should be evident by now, the educator is an important agent in networked learning. Instead of being the sole or dominant filter of information, he now shares this task with other methods and individuals.
  • Filtering can be done in explicit ways – such as selecting readings around course topics – or in less obvious ways – such as writing summary blog posts around topics. Learning is an eliminative process. By determining what doesn’t belong, a learner develops and focuses his understanding of a topic. The teacher assists in the process by providing one stream of filtered information. The student is then faced with making nuanced selections based on the multiple information streams he encounters
  • Stephen’s statements that resonated with many learners centers on modelling as a teaching practice: “To teach is to model and to demonstrate. To learn is to practice and to reflect.” (As far as I can tell, he first made the statement during OCC in 2007).
  • Modelling has its roots in apprenticeship. Learning is a multi-faceted process, involving cognitive, social, and emotional dimensions. Knowledge is similarly multi-faceted, involving declarative, procedural, and academic dimensions. It is unreasonable to expect a class environment to capture the richness of these dimensions. Apprenticeship learning models are among the most effective in attending to the full breadth of learning. Apprenticeship is concerned with more than cognition and knowledge (to know about) – it also addresses the process of becoming a carpenter, plumber, or physician.
  • Without an online identity, you can’t connect with others – to know and be known. I don’t think I’m overstating the importance of have a presence in order to participate in networks. To teach well in networks – to weave a narrative of coherence with learners – requires a point of presence. As a course progresses, the teacher provides summary comments, synthesizes discussions, provides critical perspectives, and directs learners to resources they may not have encountered before.
  • Persistent presence in the learning network is needed for the teacher to amplify, curate, aggregate, and filter content and to model critical thinking and cognitive attributes that reflect the needs of a discipline.
  • Teaching and learning in social and technological networks is similarly surprising – it’s hard to imagine that many of the tools we’re using are less than a decade old (the methods of learning in networks are not new, however. People have always learned in social networks).
  • We’re still early in many of these trends. Many questions remain unanswered about privacy, ethics in networks, and assessment.
  • We’re still early in many of these trends. Many questions remain unanswered about privacy, ethics in networks, and assessment.
  • The tools for controlling both content and conversation have shifted from the educator to the learner. We require a system that acknowledges this reality.
  • In order for these networks to work effectively, learners must be conscious of the need for diversity and should include nodes that offer critical or antagonistic perspectives on all topic areas. Sensemaking in complex environments is a social process.
  • In order for these networks to work effectively, learners must be conscious of the need for diversity and should include nodes that offer critical or antagonistic perspectives on all topic areas. Sensemaking in complex environments is a social process.
  • In order for these networks to work effectively, learners must be conscious of the need for diversity and should include nodes that offer critical or antagonistic perspectives on all topic areas. Sensemaking in complex environments is a social process.
  •  
    Discusses the role of teachers in the learning  process through social networks: He gives seven roles 1. Amplifying, 2. Curating, 3. Wayfinding and socially-driven sensemaking, 4. Aggregating, 5. Filtering, 6. Modelling, 7. Persistent presence. He ends with this provocative thought: "My view is that change in education needs to be systemic and substantial. Education is concerned with content and conversations. The tools for controlling both content and conversation have shifted from the educator to the learner. We require a system that acknowledges this reality."
David Wetzel

Wiki or Blog: Which is Better? - 2 views

  •  
    Both wikis and blogs provide teachers with a a dynamic process for integrating Web 2.0 technology in their science and math classes. These two types of online technology offer students a more engaging process for learning. Both are relatively easy technology which do not require teachers or students to learn any special program technology or computer skills. Their uses and applications are only limited by the vision and purpose for helping students learn.
GoEd Online

101 Web 2.0 Tools for Teachers You Should Know About - 1 views

  •  
    The 101 best web 2.0 tools for teachers based on functionality, application, ease of use and compatibility with educational tools.
Dennis OConnor

Why You Should Consider "Implementing Instructional Technology Innovations" | Emerging Education Technology - 0 views

  • This 10 week online course provided an introduction to many Web 2.0 tools and ways in which they might be used in the classroom. This past September through December, I had the good fortune of taking this online course, an offering from the University of Wisconsin – Stout. Instructor Ann Bell has been teaching the course for several years, and has developed a well rounded set of modules that offer a thorough introduction to many web-based (and mostly free) technologies that can be used in engaging and practical ways in course work.
  •  
    "This 10 week online course provided an introduction to many Web 2.0 tools and ways in which they might be used in the classroom. This past September through December, I had the good fortune of taking this online course, an offering from the University of Wisconsin - Stout. Instructor Ann Bell has been teaching the course for several years, and has developed a well rounded set of modules that offer a thorough introduction to many web-based (and mostly free) technologies that can be used in engaging and practical ways in course work."
1 - 20 of 304 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page