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Leah Evans

Contractions - 0 views

  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put together and an apostrophe is added to replace the omitted letters.
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put together
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put together
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  • together
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put  
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put  
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put  
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put  
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  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put  
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  • Word Lists Analogies - New!CapitonymsCompound Words - New!  Contractions Dolch - Sight WordsGeography ListsHomophones, Homonyms, etc.Literature Based Word ListsMath Vocabulary - Most Popular!Monthly Holiday ListsMultiple Meaning Words - New!Phonics & Sight Word CurriculumPossessive NounsSample Lists By GradeScience Vocabulary - New!Sequential Spelling ProgramSound Alike WordsSyllables - New!Word Abbreviations Help and InformationFAQs - Frequently Asked QuestionsPrintablesOur Educational AwardsTestmonials- New!Custom Sentences and Definitions HandLiterature WorksheetsStudent Literature PracticeTeacher Training VideosGetting Started Welcome LettersFunding Sources - New! ArticlesResearch on Spelling AutomaticityThe Importance of SpellingRecommended Learning ResourcesImprove your Literature skillsAdopt-A-ClassroomSpellingCity and NCom  put ingReading ComprehensionIncorporating Spelling Into ReadingLiterature Prompts that Motivate   Contractions Contractions
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  • Contractions
  • Word Lists Analogies - New! Capitonyms Compound Words - New!    Contractions Dolch - Sight Words Geography Lists Homophones, Homonyms, etc. Literature Based Word Lists Math Vocabulary - Most Popular! Monthly Holiday Lists Multiple Meaning Words - New! Phonics & Sight Word Curriculum Possessive Nouns Sample Lists By Grade Science Vocabulary - New! Sequential Spelling Program Sound Alike Words Syllables - New! Word Abbreviations Help and Information FAQs - Frequently Asked Questions Printables Our Educational Awards Testmonials - New! Custom Sentences and Definitions HandLiterature Worksheets Student Literature Practice Teacher Training Videos Getting Started Welcome Letters Funding Sources - New! Articles Research on Spelling Automaticity The Importance of Spelling Recommended Learning Resources Improve your Literature skills Adopt-A-Classroom SpellingCity and NCom   put ing Reading Comprehension Incorporating Spelling Into Reading Literature Prompts that Motivate   Contractions Contractions
  • tractions
  • Contraction
  • Contractions
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  • are contracted or put  
  • Contractions   are formed  when two words are contracted or put  together
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  • Contractions   are formed   when two words are contracted or put   together
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    Free games to reinforce the usage and spelling of contractions.
Rocket Rocket

Dissertation/Thesis Writing Help - 0 views

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    Academic Writing Help Virtual-Dissertation.com (Pioneer in Academic Writing) We provide Writing help to develop quality Essays, Term Papers, Course work, Thesis and Dissertation, etc. for those who are quality oriented. We cover lots of different subjects such as, Cyber Laws, Cyber Security, English Writing, Anthropology, Social Science, Case Studies, Law, Philosophy, Psychology, IT, Economics, Business, Marketing, Management, Politics, Global Issues and lots of others and we are not to bound only these. Just Contact Us for any query and Order.......We are here at: http://www.Virtual-Dissertation.com
Dennis OConnor

Electronic Literature - 0 views

  • This is a beta-launch. I would like to work directly with some high school/college classes to refine the exercises. Please contact me at deenalarsen AT yahoo.com. Thanks.
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    Electronic literature uses links, images, sound, navigation, as well as text to convey meaning. Electronic literature is ergodic, and thus it is up to the reader to piece together the materials as the reader goes through the work. Elit 101explains how these elements work to convey meaning and provides examples and exercises for each element.
Judy Robison

Figment: Write yourself in. - 44 views

shared by Judy Robison on 07 Dec 10 - No Cached
  •  
    an experiment in online literature, a free platform for young people to read and write fiction, both on their computers and on their cellphones. Users are invited to write novels, short stories and poems, collaborate with other writers and give and receive feedback on the work posted on the site.
Fabian Aguilar

Educational Leadership:Literacy 2.0:Orchestrating the Media Collage - 0 views

  • Public narrative embraces a number of specialty literacies, including math literacy, research literacy, and even citizenship literacy, to name a few. Understanding the evolving nature of literacy is important because it enables us to understand the emerging nature of illiteracy as well. After all, regardless of the literacy under consideration, the illiterate get left out.
  • Modern literacy has always meant being able to both read and write narrative in the media forms of the day, whatever they may be. Just being able to read is not sufficient.
  • The act of creating original media forces students to lift the hood, so to speak, and see media's intricate workings that conspire to do one thing above all others: make the final media product appear smooth, effortless, and natural. "Writing media" compels reflection about reading media, which is crucial in an era in which professional media makers view young people largely in terms of market share.
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  • As part of their own intellectual retooling in the era of the media collage, teachers can begin by experimenting with a wide range of new media to determine how they best serve their own and their students' educational interests. A simple video can demonstrate a science process; a blog can generate an organic, integrated discussion about a piece of literature; new media in the form of games, documentaries, and digital stories can inform the study of complex social issues; and so on. Thus, a corollary to this guideline is simply, "Experiment fearlessly." Although experts may claim to understand the pedagogical implications of media, the reality is that media are evolving so quickly that teachers should trust their instincts as they explore what works. We are all learning together.
  • Both essay writing and blog writing are important, and for that reason, they should support rather than conflict with each other. Essays, such as the one you are reading right now, are suited for detailed argument development, whereas blog writing helps with prioritization, brevity, and clarity. The underlying shift here is one of audience: Only a small portion of readers read essays, whereas a large portion of the public reads Web material. Thus, the pressure is on for students to think and write clearly and precisely if they are to be effective contributors to the collective narrative of the Web.
  • The demands of digital literacy make clear that both research reports and stories represent important approaches to thinking and communicating; students need to be able to understand and use both forms. One of the more exciting pedagogical frontiers that awaits us is learning how to combine the two, blending the critical thinking of the former with the engagement of the latter. The report–story continuum is rich with opportunity to blend research and storytelling in interesting, effective ways within the domain of new media.
  • The new media collage depends on a combination of individual and collective thinking and creative endeavor. It requires all of us to express ourselves clearly as individuals, while merging our expression into the domain of public narrative. This can include everything from expecting students to craft a collaborative media collage project in language arts classes to requiring them to contribute to international wikis and collective research projects about global warming with colleagues they have never seen. What is key here is that these are now "normal" kinds of expression that carry over into the world of work and creative personal expression beyond school.
  • Students need to be media literate to understand how media technique influences perception and thinking. They also need to understand larger social issues that are inextricably linked to digital citizenship, such as security, environmental degradation, digital equity, and living in a multicultural, networked world. We want our students to use technology not only effectively and creatively, but also wisely, to be concerned with not just how to use digital tools, but also when to use them and why.
  • Fluency is the ability to practice literacy at the advanced levels required for sophisticated communication within social and workplace environments. Digital fluency facilitates the language of leadership and innovation that enables us to translate our ideas into compelling professional practice. The fluent will lead, the literate will follow, and the rest will get left behind.
  • Digital fluency is much more of a perspective than a technical skill set. Teachers who are truly digitally fluent will blend creativity and innovation into lesson plans, assignments, and projects and understand the role that digital tools can play in creating academic expectations that are authentically connected, both locally and globally, to their students' lives.
  • Focus on expression first and technology second—and everything will fall into place.
Dennis OConnor

Mr. Robinson's Neighborhood : 7th Grade Humanities - 22 views

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    This is James Robinson's class blog. It also hosts blogs from all of his kids. James teaches literature and literature at SAS (Shanghai American School). He's been blogging for about a year and a half. As you'll see if you visit this great example of classroom blog use, this blog rocks! James is using Wordpress to create a website/blog presentation. He's happy to have teachers or students drop in and respond to the personal blogs his students have created. If you're looking for a chance at an international student exchange blog connection, give it a look. (Heck, give it a look if you're just curious.) The kids love to get comments from folks around the world so don't forget to be interactive! ~ Dennis O'Connor
Roland Gesthuizen

40 Twitter Hashtags for Writers - 0 views

  • The point of this is to make it easier to find all tweets containing writing advice : you just search for “#writetip”. Similarly, you could find a stream of publication tips by keeping an eye on tweets with “#pubtip” in them.
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    "Using relevant hashtags in your own tweets also increases the likelihood of others seeing your post and becoming a follower. They're a great way to engage with a particular community of Twitter users. The following is a list of some of the hashtags that will be of interest to writers. The list can never be exhaustive because anyone can invent a new tag at any time. Most are self-explanatory, although some need explanation"
Steve Ransom

Technology in Schools Faces Questions on Value - NYTimes.com - 9 views

  • Critics counter that, absent clear proof, schools are being motivated by a blind faith in technology and an overemphasis on digital skills — like using PowerPoint and multimedia tools — at the expense of math, reading and writing fundamentals. They say the technology advocates have it backward when they press to upgrade first and ask questions later.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      A valid criticism when technology implementation is decoupled from meaningful and effective pedagogy. You can't buy measurable change/improvement.
  • district was innovating
  • how the district was innovating.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Again, this is very different than how TEACHERS are innovating their PRACTICES. It's much more challenging than making a slick brochure that communicates how much technology your district has.
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  • there is no good way to quantify those achievements — putting them in a tough spot with voters deciding whether to bankroll this approach again
  • “We’ve jumped on bandwagons for different eras without knowing fully what we’re doing. This might just be the new bandwagon,” he said. “I hope not.”
    • Steve Ransom
       
      There's a confidence building statement for you....
  • $46.3 million for laptops, classroom projectors, networking gear and other technology for teachers and administrators.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Exactly... and how much was spent on equipping teachers to change their practices to effectively leverage this new infrastructure?
  • If we know something works
    • Steve Ransom
       
      And what is that "something"? New technology? If so, you missed the boat.
  • it is hard to separate the effect of the laptops from the effect of the teacher training
  • The high-level analyses that sum up these various studies, not surprisingly, give researchers pause about whether big investments in technology make sense.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Why does the argument for making schools relevant and using current cultural tools need to be backed with performance data? Give politicians and superintendents horses instead of cars and see how long that lasts.
  • Good teachers, he said, can make good use of computers, while bad teachers won’t, and they and their students could wind up becoming distracted by the technology.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Finally, a valid point.
  • “Test scores are the same, but look at all the other things students are doing: learning to use the Internet to research, learning to organize their work, learning to use professional writing tools, learning to collaborate with others.”
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Exactly. But somehow, "value" has been equated with test scores alone. Do we have a strong body of research on pencil effectiveness or clay effectiveness or chair effectiveness?
  • “It’s not the stuff that counts — it’s what you do with it that matters.”
  • “There is a connection between the physical hand on the paper and the words on the page,” she said. “It’s intimate.”
  • “They’re inundated with 24/7 media, so they expect it,”
    • Steve Ransom
       
      And you expect them to always engage enthusiastically with tools that are no longer relevant in their culture?
  • The 30 students in the classroom held wireless clickers into which they punched their answers. Seconds later, a pie chart appeared on the screen: 23 percent answered “True,” 70 percent “False,” and 6 percent didn’t know.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Okay... and you follow up with a totally trivial example of the power of technology in learning.
  • term” that can slide past critical analysis.
  • engagement is a “fluffy
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Very true
  • rofessor Cuban at Stanford argues that keeping children engaged requires an environment of constant novelty, which cannot be sustained.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      If that is so, why not back up your claim by linking to the source here. I have a feeling he has been misquoted and taken out of context here.
  • that computers can distract and not instruct.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Computers don't really "instruct". That's why we have teachers who are supposed to know what they are doing and why they are doing it... and monitoring kids while keeping learning meaningful.
  • guide on the side.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      But many teachers are simply not prepared for how to do this effectively. To ignore this fact is just naive.
  • Professor Cuban at Stanford
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Are they in love with Cuban or something? Perhaps they should actually look at the research... or interview other authorities. Isn't that what reporting is all about? I think this reporter must be a product of too much Google, right?
  • But she loves the fact that her two children, a fourth-grader and first-grader, are learning technology, including PowerPoint
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Again, the fact that any supporter is happy that their kids are learning PowerPoint illustrates the degree of naiveté in their understanding of technology's role in learning.
  • creating an impetus to rethink education entirely
  • Mr. Share bases his buying decisions on two main factors: what his teachers tell him they need, and his experience. For instance, he said he resisted getting the interactive whiteboards sold as Smart Boards until, one day in 2008, he saw a teacher trying to mimic the product with a jury-rigged projector setup. “It was an ‘Aha!’ moment,” he said, leading him to buy Smart Boards, made by a company called Smart Technologies.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Herein lies another huge problem. Mr. Director of Technology seems to base no decisions on what the learning and technology literature have to say... nor does he consult those who would be considered authorities on technology infused learning (emphasis on learning here)
  • This is big business.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      No kidding.
  • “Do we really need technology to learn?” she said. “It’s a very valid time to ask the question, right before this goes on the ballot.”
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Anyone who asks that should volunteer to have their home and work computer confiscated. After all, it's just a distraction, right?
Tom Daccord

About Traci | c h a n g e l o g - 0 views

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    website is the work of Traci Gardner and brings together her blogs, educational materials, and hobbies.
Leonard Miller

Final College-Readiness Definition Guides Test Consortium - Curriculum Matters - Education Week - 0 views

  • PARCC's policy will be that students earn the "college readiness" determination by performing at level 4 on a 5-level test
  • Reaching that level on the language arts part of the exam will mean that students have "demonstrated the academic knowledge, skills, and practices necessary" to skip remedial classes and go directly into entry-level, credit-bearing courses in "college English composition, literature, and technical courses requiring college-level reading and literature."
  • college-readiness scores on the test will be set in such a way that students who score at that level—level 4—will have a 75 percent chance of earning a grade of C or better in those college courses.
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  • Scoring at level 5 on the test will reflect a "distinguished command" of the subject, and level 4 will reflect a "strong" command. Level 3 shows a "moderate" command, level 2 a "partial" command, and level 1 a "minimal" command.
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    PARCC definition of "college ready"
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