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Caroline Bucky-Beaver

xFruits - Compose your information system - 0 views

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    Multifunctional web service that enables you to do almost anything with RSS feeds. There are 11 different feed feed you can use. Combine multiple RSS feeds, convert feeds into PDF, convert feeds to speech, create a mobile site from any feed, etc.
David Wetzel

Top 10 Online Tools for Teaching Science and Math - 0 views

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    Why use Web 2.0 tools in science and math classes? The primary reason is they facilitate access to input and interaction with content through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. These tools offer enormous advantages for science and math teachers, in terms of helping their students learn using Web 2.0 tools. For example: * Most of these tools can be edited from any computer connected to the Internet. Teachers can add, edit and delete information even during class time. * Students learn how to use these tools for academic purposes and, at the same time, can transfer their use to their personal lives and future professional careers. * RSS toolss allow students to access all the desired research information on one page. * Students learn to be autonomous in their learning process.
Stéphane Métral

Feed43 : Convert any web page to news Feed on the fly - 0 views

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    This free online service converts any web page to an RSS feed on the fly. Cet outil transforme n'importe quelle page Web en fil RSS.
fabrizio bartoli

Pipes: Rewire the web - 0 views

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    "About Pipes Pipes is a powerful composition tool to aggregate, manipulate, and mashup content from around the web. Like Unix pipes, simple commands can be combined together to create output that meets your needs: - combine many feeds into one, then sort, filter and translate it.  - geocode your favorite feeds and browse the items on an interactive map. - power widgets/badges on your web site. - grab the output of any Pipes as RSS, JSON, KML, and other formats."
Philippe Scheimann

B.L. Ochman's blog: Some Social Media Search Tools I Like: I'll show you mine if you show me yours. - 34 views

  • Some Social Media Search Tools I Like: I'll show you mine if you show me yours.
  • Here are some of the tools and apps I like for social media search. Got others? Twitseek: enter a URL, hashtag or keyword and it finds Tweets related to themHashtags.org tracks #hastags and also trends each one and shows you most popular ones Poll Everywhere lets you poll by SMS, Twitter or the Web in real-time. It replaces clunky audience response hardware at events and lets people use their phones to respond. Kikin kills me! It augments Google searches with relevant information from my social media contacts. So, if I'm shopping, I can get opinions, prices, see reviews and more, without ever leaving the product page. There's a good review on Techcrunch. Tweetscan Twitter search tool that updates every second and will send you emails when your keywords are mentioned, or let you back up your Twitter stream, which Twitter purges regularly Twitscoop searches and tracks search terms, can create a graph of results if there's enough data. It'll show the trend for your keyword activity/popularity Tweepsearch twitter profile and bio search by keywords Twitstat searches and also shows search trends Twitter Search (formerly Summize) isTwitter's own search engine, and the advanced version is very robust Backtweets : enter a URL and it finds Tweets that linked to it. Mr. Tweet recommends people to follow, communities to join, communities your friends and followers are in, and hot topics in communities. Tweetmi displays the most active Twitterers and top stories from the people you follow. So it's a personalized aggregation of your tools, displaying the the real-time conversation. One Riot is a real-time search engine that crawls the links people share on Twitter, Digg and other social sharing services, matches them to trending topics on Twitter or ones you search. Collecta does a real-time meta search on topics you choose, and, unlike most other search tools, saves your searches for future use.
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    good list of social media search tools
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    finding your way in social media
Leslie Holwerda

Teachers: Embrace Technology or Students Will Leave You Behind - 0 views

  • If you think about how we use technology in our adult lives, it’s primarily a communication experience — email, WebEx, text messages and collaboration tools. It’s social, but we’re not letting these collaborative tools into the classroom.
  • If we don’t, we will lose their attention, and to some degree, their respect.
  • But they’ll do better by constructing meaning from it socially — not alone with a text
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  • leverage all the tools available to foster creativity, inspire curiosity, and provide the knowledge our children need for success.
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    engage students using web 2.0 tools
Caroline Roche

Improving school improvement with Web 2.0 tools - 62 views

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    A really useful document which shows you how to use 4 free Web 2 tools to tools into your School Improvement plan
LUCIAN DUMA

#MOOC next Big Thing in XXI Century Education . Top 12 free tools you can use now to join / organize a #mooc - 0 views

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    Just posted:Top 12 free tools you can use now to join/organize a #mooc  http://dumacornellucian.edu.glogster.com/moocbylucianecurator .Add your tools-back if you like my post .
Carlos Quintero

Innovate: Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software - 0 views

  • Web 2.0 has inspired intense and growing interest, particularly as wikis, weblogs (blogs), really simple syndication (RSS) feeds, social networking sites, tag-based folksonomies, and peer-to-peer media-sharing applications have gained traction in all sectors of the education industry (Allen 2004; Alexander 2006)
  • Web 2.0 allows customization, personalization, and rich opportunities for networking and collaboration, all of which offer considerable potential for addressing the needs of today's diverse student body (Bryant 2006).
  • In contrast to earlier e-learning approaches that simply replicated traditional models, the Web 2.0 movement with its associated array of social software tools offers opportunities to move away from the last century's highly centralized, industrial model of learning and toward individual learner empowerment through designs that focus on collaborative, networked interaction (Rogers et al. 2007; Sims 2006; Sheely 2006)
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  • learning management systems (Exhibit 1).
  • The reality, however, is that today's students demand greater control of their own learning and the inclusion of technologies in ways that meet their needs and preferences (Prensky 2005)
  • Tools like blogs, wikis, media-sharing applications, and social networking sites can support and encourage informal conversation, dialogue, collaborative content generation, and knowledge sharing, giving learners access to a wide range of ideas and representations. Used appropriately, they promise to make truly learner-centered education a reality by promoting learner agency, autonomy, and engagement in social networks that straddle multiple real and virtual communities by reaching across physical, geographic, institutional, and organizational boundaries.
  • "I have always imagined the information space as something to which everyone has immediate and intuitive access, and not just to browse, but to create” (2000, 216). Social software tools make it easy to contribute ideas and content, placing the power of media creation and distribution into the hands of "the people formerly known as the audience" (Rosen 2006).
  • the most promising settings for a pedagogy that capitalizes on the capabilities of these tools are fully online or blended so that students can engage with peers, instructors, and the community in creating and sharing ideas. In this model, some learners engage in creative authorship, producing and manipulating digital images and video clips, tagging them with chosen keywords, and making this content available to peers worldwide through Flickr, MySpace, and YouTube
  • Student-centered tasks designed by constructivist teachers reach toward this ideal, but they too often lack the dimension of real-world interactivity and community engagement that social software can contribute.
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of teaching and learning (Exhibit 2).
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of teaching and learning
  • Pedagogy 2.0 is defined by: Content: Microunits that augment thinking and cognition by offering diverse perspectives and representations to learners and learner-generated resources that accrue from students creating, sharing, and revising ideas; Curriculum: Syllabi that are not fixed but dynamic, open to negotiation and learner input, consisting of bite-sized modules that are interdisciplinary in focus and that blend formal and informal learning;Communication: Open, peer-to-peer, multifaceted communication using multiple media types to achieve relevance and clarity;Process: Situated, reflective, integrated thinking processes that are iterative, dynamic, and performance and inquiry based;Resources: Multiple informal and formal sources that are rich in media and global in reach;Scaffolds: Support for students from a network of peers, teachers, experts, and communities; andLearning tasks: Authentic, personalized, learner-driven and learner-designed, experiential tasks that enable learners to create content.
  • Instructors implementing Pedagogy 2.0 principles will need to work collaboratively with learners to review, edit, and apply quality assurance mechanisms to student work while also drawing on input from the wider community outside the classroom or institution (making use of the "wisdom of crowds” [Surowiecki 2004]).
  • A small portion of student performance content—if it is new knowledge—will be useful to keep. Most of the student performance content will be generated, then used, and will become stored in places that will never again see the light of day. Yet . . . it is still important to understand that the role of this student content in learning is critical.
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts. In so doing, learners generate their own personal rules and knowledge structures, using them to make sense of their experiences and refining them through interaction and dialogue with others.
  • Other divides are evident. For example, the social networking site Facebook is now the most heavily trafficked Web site in the United States with over 8 million university students connected across academic communities and institutions worldwide. The majority of Facebook participants are students, and teachers may not feel welcome in these communities. Moreover, recent research has shown that many students perceive teaching staff who use Facebook as lacking credibility as they may present different self-images online than they do in face-to-face situations (Mazer, Murphy, and Simonds 2007). Further, students may perceive instructors' attempts to coopt such social technologies for educational purposes as intrusions into their space. Innovative teachers who wish to adopt social software tools must do so with these attitudes in mind.
  • "students want to be able to take content from other people. They want to mix it, in new creative ways—to produce it, to publish it, and to distribute it"
  • Furthermore, although the advent of Web 2.0 and the open-content movement significantly increase the volume of information available to students, many higher education students lack the competencies necessary to navigate and use the overabundance of information available, including the skills required to locate quality sources and assess them for objectivity, reliability, and currency
  • In combination with appropriate learning strategies, Pedagogy 2.0 can assist students in developing such critical thinking and metacognitive skills (Sener 2007; McLoughlin, Lee, and Chan 2006).
  • We envision that social technologies coupled with a paradigm of learning focused on knowledge creation and community participation offer the potential for radical and transformational shifts in teaching and learning practices, allowing learners to access peers, experts, and the wider community in ways that enable reflective, self-directed learning.
  • . By capitalizing on personalization, participation, and content creation, existing and future Pedagogy 2.0 practices can result in educational experiences that are productive, engaging, and community based and that extend the learning landscape far beyond the boundaries of classrooms and educational institutions.
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    About pedagogic 2.0
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    Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software Catherine McLoughlin and Mark J. W. Lee
Fabian Aguilar

The End in Mind » An Open (Institutional) Learning Network - 1 views

  • There are components of an open learning network that can and should live in the cloud: Personal publishing tools (blogs, personal websites, wikis) Social networking apps Open content Student generated content
  • Some tools might straddle the boundary between the institution and the cloud, e.g. portfolios, collaboration tools and websites with course & learning activity content.
  • Other tools and data belong squarely within the university network: Student Information Systems Secure assessment tools (e.g., online quiz & test applications) Institutional gradebook (for secure communication about scores, grades & toolsback) Licensed and or proprietary institutional content
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  • To facilitate the relationships between students and teachers, students and students, and students and content, universities need to provide students the ability to input additional information about themselves into the institutional repository, such as: URLs & RSS feeds for anything and everything the student wants to share with the learning community Social networking usernames (probably on an opt-in basis) Portfolio URLs (particularly to simplify program assessment activities) Assignment & artifact links (provided and used most frequently via the gradebook interface)
  • Integrating these technologies assumes: Web services compatibility to exchange data between systems and easily redisplay content as is or mashed-up via alternate interfaces RSS everywhere to aggregate content in a variety of places
  • While there’s still a lot of work to do, this feels like we’re getting closer to something real and doable. Thoughts?
Maggie Verster

A-Z Web tools: F - 48 views

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    A lot of cool tools I have not heard of before!
Tero Toivanen

Tools (and Spaces) for Self Organised Learning Environment (SOLE) | FLOSSE Posse - 21 views

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    "The self organized learning environment (SOLE) is a model to adapt school space to facilitate inquiry based learning. The idea is simple and powerful: "A teacher encourages their class to work as a community to answer questions using computers with internet access"."
LUCIAN DUMA

Top 10 startup curation tools in SMILE PROJECT :) - 0 views

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    Proud to be Leader in Cop2 organized in SMILE :) project managed by European Schoolnet . I tried to describe here my top 10 Social Media Curation tools to develop a PLN . Please add your tools-back and add comments with your favorite startups to build a PLN here http://bitly.com/collaborationincop2smile
kelseylgreene

Google Debuts Education Tool Oppia for Teaching Others - 0 views

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    description here 
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