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Stephanie Sandifer

Esther Wojcicki: Revolution Needed for Teaching Literacy in a Digital Age - 28 views

  • But one area of American life that is consistently resistant to innovation is our education system.
  • children who are below grade level by age ten tend to stagnate and eventually give up and drop out in high school. Harvard educational psychologist Jeanne Chall famously called this phenomenon the "fourth grade reading slump,
  • In the classroom, digital media also have other major advantages. These media teach students to master the production of knowledge, not just the consumption of knowledge. Kids learn to create videos, write blogs, collaborate online; the also learn to play video games, do digital storytelling, fan fiction, music, graphic art, anime and even more. Their informal process of learning, collaboration, and transforming passion into knowledge is desperately needed in schools today.
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  • to train teachers to help students learn to read by transforming information for discovery and problem-solving.
  • all beginning teachers learn how to use online collaborative tools, video production tools, blogging tools, mobile tools and a variety of commercial and non-profit programs targeting the classrooms. Frequently young teachers know how to use these tools on a personal level but not in the classroom.
  • Let's building on national models like Communities in Schools, First, Computer Clubhouse, Club Tech of the Boys and Girls Clubs, and the Quest to Learn, Digital Youth Network and School of One models in Chicago and New York City.It is time to extend the learning day and create a place in every community where young children can gain confidence in their literacy and interactive technology skills.
  • laboratories for testing many different digital approaches to learning and assessment, as well as for testing different ways to break down the barriers between in- and out-of-school learning
  • a hub for the professional development of digitally savvy teachers.
  • embrace the potential revolutionary power of the digital digital that have defined the first decade of the 21st century
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    embrace the potential revolutionary power of the digital digital that have defined the first decade of the 21st century
J Black

Web 2.0 Tools - Web 2.0 That Works: Marzano & Web 2.0 - 3 views

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    Web 2.0 Tools From Web 2.0 That Works: Marzano & Web 2.0 Jump to: navigation, search Master List of Web 2.0 Tools "Y" Under each category indicates that this tool can be used with this strategy. "Free +" Indicates that the tool is free at the basic level, but that more advanced versions are available at a cost. Category Key: SD = Identifying Similarities and Differences CL = Cooperative Learning SNT = Summarizing and Note-Taking ER = Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition HP = Homework and Practice NR = Nonlinguistic Representation OF = Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback HYP = Generating and Testing Hypotheses QCO = Questions, Cues, and Advance Organizers Tool Link Desc Cost SD CL SNT ER HP NR OF HYP QCO Notes Ajax13 [[1]] Online Graphic Editor Free Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Requires Firefox 1.5 (or higher) Browser Backpack [[2]] Online Personal Organizer Free + Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Basecamp [[3]] Online Project Collaboration Free + Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Blogger [[4]] Blog Hosting Website Free Y Y Y Y Y Y bubbl.us [[5]] Online Brainstorming Free Y Y Y Y del.icio.us [[6]] Online Social Bookmarks Free Y Y Y Y Diigo [[7]] Online Social Annotation Free Y Y Y Y Y Y EditGrid [[8]] Online Spreadsheets Free + Y Y Y Y Y Integrates with Facebook and iPhone EduBlogs [[9]] Blog Hosting Website Free Y Y Y Y Y Y Exploratree [[10]] Online Graphic Organizer Free Y Y Y Y Y Y Interactive, pre-made graphic organizers that can be edited online Flickr [[11]] Photo Hosting Website Free + Y Y Y Y Part of Zoho Suite of Online Apps Gliffy [[12]] Online Diagramming Software Free + Y Y Y Google Documents [[13]] Online Word Processor Free Y Y Y Y Y Y Also contains Spreadsheets & Presentations Google Earth [[14]] Dynamic Global Geographic App Free Y Y Downloads to computer Google Maps [[15]] Online Ma
David Wetzel

What Does the Online Digital Footprint in Your Classroom Look Like? - 0 views

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    In contrast to the digital footprint you use for your personal learning network, this focus is on the online digital footprint students' use in your science or math classroom. The power of a well designed digital footprint brings the capacity to transform a classroom into an online learning community. Within this community your students use digital digital to create and develop a personal learning network.
J Black

Educational Leadership:Literacy 2.0:Orchestrating the Media Collage - 1 views

  • New media demand new literacies. Because of inexpensive, easy-to-use, widely distributed new media tools, being literate now means being able to read and write a number of new media forms, including sound, graphics, and moving images in addition to text.
  • New media coalesce into a collage. Being literate also means being able to integrate emerging new media forms into a single narrative or "media collage," such as a Web page, blog, or digital story.
  • New media are largely participatory, social media. Digital literacy requires that students have command of the media collage within the context of a social Web, often referred to as Web 2.0. The social Web provides venues for individual and collaborative narrative construction and publication through blogs and such services as MySpace, Google Docs, and YouTube. As student participation goes public, the pressure to produce high-quality work increases.
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  • Historically, new media first appear to the vast majority of us in read-only form because they are controlled by a relatively few technicians, developers, and distributors who can understand or afford them. The rest of us only evolve into writers once the new media tools become easy to use, affordable, and widely available, whether these tools are cheap pencils and paper or inexpensive tools tools and shareware.
  • Thus, a new dimension of literacy is now in play—namely, the ability to adapt to new media forms and fit them into the overall media collage quickly and effectively.
  • n the mid 1960s, Marshall McLuhan explained that conventional literacy caused us to trade an ear for an eye, and in so doing, trade the social context of the oral tradition for the private point of view of reading and writing. To him, television was the first step in our "retribalization," providing a common social experience that could serve as the basis for dialogue in the global village.2  However, television told someone else's story, not ours. It was not until Web 2.0 that we had the tools to come full circle and produce and consume social narrative in equal measure. Much of the emerging nature of literacy is a result of inexpensive, widely available, flexible Web 2.0 tools that enable anyone, regardless of technical skill, to play some part in reinventing literacy.
  • What is new is that the tools of literacy, as well as their effects, are now a topic of literacy itself.
  • Students need to be media literate to understand how media technique influences perception and thinking. They also need to understand larger social issues that are inextricably linked to digital citizenship, such as security, environmental degradation, digital equity, and living in a multicultural, networked world. We want our students to use technology not only effectively and creatively, but also wisely, to be concerned with not just how to use digital digital, but also when to use them and why.
  • The fluent will lead, the literate will follow, and the rest will get left behind.
  • They need to be the guide on the side rather than the technician magician.
David Wetzel

Top 10 Online Tools for Teaching Science and Math - 0 views

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    Why use Web 2.0 tools in science and math classes? The primary reason is they facilitate access to input and interaction with content through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. These tools offer enormous advantages for science and math teachers, in terms of helping their students learn using Web 2.0 tools. For example: * Most of these tools can be edited from any computer connected to the Internet. Teachers can add, edit and delete information even during class time. * Students learn how to use these tools for academic purposes and, at the same time, can transfer their use to their personal lives and future professional careers. * RSS feeds allow students to access all the desired research information on one page. * Students learn to be autonomous in their learning process.
Tom Daccord

Grazing for Digital Natives - DigiStory20 - 60 views

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    Digital Storytelling with Web 2.0 -- Digital Online Video Editors Video Hosting Image Editors Image Resources Audacity (Sound Editor) Publish Audio Audio Resources Image / Video Mashups Timeline Generators Comics Digital Mind Mapping Mapping Digital Digital Storytelling with Web 2.0"
wittyben

21 Digital Digital to Build Vocabulary | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies - 0 views

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    These digital digital show promise to support word learning, review, and play with language. They are grouped them into four categories: Reference digital, Word Clouds, Games and Review, Word Walls and Virtual Field Trips.
Fabian Aguilar

Educational Leadership:Literacy 2.0:Orchestrating the Media Collage - 0 views

  • Public narrative embraces a number of specialty literacies, including math literacy, research literacy, and even citizenship literacy, to name a few. Understanding the evolving nature of literacy is important because it enables us to understand the emerging nature of illiteracy as well. After all, regardless of the literacy under consideration, the illiterate get left out.
  • Modern literacy has always meant being able to both read and write narrative in the media forms of the day, whatever they may be. Just being able to read is not sufficient.
  • The act of creating original media forces students to lift the hood, so to speak, and see media's intricate workings that conspire to do one thing above all others: make the final media product appear smooth, effortless, and natural. "Writing media" compels reflection about reading media, which is crucial in an era in which professional media makers view young people largely in terms of market share.
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  • As part of their own intellectual retooling in the era of the media collage, teachers can begin by experimenting with a wide range of new media to determine how they best serve their own and their students' educational interests. A simple video can demonstrate a science process; a blog can generate an organic, integrated discussion about a piece of literature; new media in the form of games, documentaries, and digital stories can inform the study of complex social issues; and so on. Thus, a corollary to this guideline is simply, "Experiment fearlessly." Although experts may claim to understand the pedagogical implications of media, the reality is that media are evolving so quickly that teachers should trust their instincts as they explore what works. We are all learning together.
  • Both essay writing and blog writing are important, and for that reason, they should support rather than conflict with each other. Essays, such as the one you are reading right now, are suited for detailed argument development, whereas blog writing helps with prioritization, brevity, and clarity. The underlying shift here is one of audience: Only a small portion of readers read essays, whereas a large portion of the public reads Web material. Thus, the pressure is on for students to think and write clearly and precisely if they are to be effective contributors to the collective narrative of the Web.
  • The demands of digital literacy make clear that both research reports and stories represent important approaches to thinking and communicating; students need to be able to understand and use both forms. One of the more exciting pedagogical frontiers that awaits us is learning how to combine the two, blending the critical thinking of the former with the engagement of the latter. The report–story continuum is rich with opportunity to blend research and storytelling in interesting, effective ways within the domain of new media.
  • The new media collage depends on a combination of individual and collective thinking and creative endeavor. It requires all of us to express ourselves clearly as individuals, while merging our expression into the domain of public narrative. This can include everything from expecting students to craft a collaborative media collage project in language arts classes to requiring them to contribute to international wikis and collective research projects about global warming with colleagues they have never seen. What is key here is that these are now "normal" kinds of expression that carry over into the world of work and creative personal expression beyond school.
  • Students need to be media literate to understand how media technique influences perception and thinking. They also need to understand larger social issues that are inextricably linked to digital citizenship, such as security, environmental degradation, digital equity, and living in a multicultural, networked world. We want our students to use technology not only effectively and creatively, but also wisely, to be concerned with not just how to use digital digital, but also when to use them and why.
  • Fluency is the ability to practice literacy at the advanced levels required for sophisticated communication within social and workplace environments. Digital fluency facilitates the language of leadership and innovation that enables us to translate our ideas into compelling professional practice. The fluent will lead, the literate will follow, and the rest will get left behind.
  • Digital fluency is much more of a perspective than a technical skill set. Teachers who are truly Digitally fluent will blend creativity and innovation into lesson plans, assignments, and projects and understand the role that Digital Digital can play in creating academic expectations that are authentically connected, both locally and globally, to their students' lives.
  • Focus on expression first and technology second—and everything will fall into place.
Kathleen N

the.Planet | the.News | YOU.edit |You.Report - 0 views

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    Site for MS-HS students ;lesson plans for teachers YOU.edit will go online in the spring of 2009. Students will be able to create their own interactive videos through the YOU.edit online editing tool that will be available in early 2009. This tool will allow students to create online reports drawn from the digital files that comprise a completed the.News segment. These component parts include video, music, graphics, interviews, and narration. YOU.edit will go online in the spring of 2009. Students will be able to create their own interactive videos through the YOU.edit online editing tool that will be available in early 2009. This tool will allow students to create online reports drawn from the digital files that comprise a completed the.News segment. These component parts include video, music, graphics, interviews, and narration.
David Wetzel

Top 5 Search Tools for Finding Flickr Images for Use in Education - 0 views

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    The top five search tools for finding Flickr images are designed to help teachers and students locate just the right image for use in any subject area and project. Without these tools finding the right image on this image hosting site is often an impossible, or at least a tedious, task. The value of this site is its ability to provide tools pictures which are often impossible for a teacher to obtain any other way. Like everything else on the internet, trying to find something is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. This where the top five search tools become valuable resources for teachers and students trying to find images comes into play. These search engines are specifically designed to search the more than three billion pictures on the Flickr hosting site.
takshilalearn

What are the top free digital marketing digital? Name of 6 Best digital - 0 views

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    Below you will be reading about the top best free digital marketing digital that will help anyone no matter it is a digital marketer or even a common person.
Jean Potter

http://betch.edublogs.org/2009/01/06/the-myth-of-the-digital-native/ - 36 views

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    Are all young people digital natives? Many older folks may well be digital immigrants but is there a marked difference in their abilities from digital natives?
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    This was a link from Joe's suggestion "ASH's 23 Things..." which I really liked. I would like to set up something similar on "my campus".
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    This article raised some great points about the labels we place on people of a certain age group, but obviously things are more complicated than the convenient labels our society uses to clasify people. The problem I see in the examples cited are the problems of a generation where you ask and it is done. Digital "immigrants" adapt and embrace new technology because of motivation. Their Job!! I agree that we need to utilize the exprience and perspective of my generation (49 yrs, 25 teaching) with the fearless exploration of my students. They show me what they've located and I can help them understand the relative value of what they've found. Help them develope the Digital of analysis and I can learn how to get to information I didn't know existed. We don't need labels, we need to inspire students to want to know what's the value of what they've discovered.
Scott Kinkoph

TeachThoughtYouth And Digital Learning: Are Kids Different Because Of Digital Media? - 0 views

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    Youth And Digital Learning: Are Kids Different Because Of Digital Media?
Neil O'Sullivan

eDidaktik | ICT in Education - 0 views

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    "On eDidaktik.dk you will find a number of articles on digital learning digital. The articles give descriptions of new, free digital digital for use in education. The articles suggest in which context the tool may be relevant, and concrete examples on, how it may be used in teaching are given."
Berylaube 00

Teaching 2.0 : A Professional Development Resource Blog: Digital Storytelling Highlights of Digital Used by Local Teachers - 0 views

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    "Digital Storytelling Highlights of Digital Used by Local Teachers Digital storytelling is a wonderful academic strategy to enhance student inspired stories and get student's that typically do not like to write another venue to participate in the lesson."
Jeff Johnson

Digital Education - 0 views

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    This blog post on Ewan McIntosh's edu.blogs.com points out a new peer-reviewed study that links Web 2.0 to academic improvement. The report found that Web 2.0 tools encourage participation and engagement, especially for those students who are timid; help students continue classroom discussions outside of the classroom; let students who are so inclined continue researching anytime, anywhere; and instill a sense of ownership and pride in students for the work they publish online, which can lead to more attention to detail and a better quality of work. The report also found that one of the biggest obstacles to using Web 2.0 tools in the classroom was the time it takes teachers to incorporate those new tools into lesson plans. Although many teachers were familiar with the tools and used them in their personal lives, they were apprehensive about how to monitor Internet use in the classroom and the time needed to figure out how those tools should be used to teach.
Allison Burrell

Teen Learning 2.0 - 0 views

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    This tutorial is designed so that you can learn how to use the tools of web 2.0 for your classes or for fun. * Each topic takes about a week to complete. * Each week you will will be introduced to at least one website [or 'tool'].( You may also get information about an aspect of tools citizenship. * Next, you have an activity to complete using the website. * The last, and most important thing you need to do is to post about what you learned on your blog. Topics: tools Citizenship; Blogging; Avatars; Photos, Images, & Giving Credit; Finding Photos and Images; Good Manners and Commenting; Creating your own images; Creating Animations and Videos; Creating Documents and Presentations; Fun with Books & reading; Evaluating informational websites; Online Sharing
Tero Toivanen

Digital Citizenship | the human network - 0 views

  • The change is already well underway, but this change is not being led by teachers, administrators, parents or politicians. Coming from the ground up, the true agents of change are the students within the educational system.
  • While some may be content to sit on the sidelines and wait until this cultural reorganization plays itself out, as educators you have no such luxury. Everything hits you first, and with full force. You are embedded within this change, as much so as this generation of students.
  • We make much of the difference between “digital immigrants”, such as ourselves, and “digital natives”, such as these children. These kids are entirely comfortable within the digital world, having never known anything else. We casually assume that this difference is merely a quantitative facility. In fact, the difference is almost entirely qualitative. The schema upon which their world-views are based, the literal ‘rules of their world’, are completely different.
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  • The Earth becomes a chalkboard, a spreadsheet, a presentation medium, where the thorny problems of global civilization and its discontents can be explored out in exquisite detail. In this sense, no problem, no matter how vast, no matter how global, will be seen as being beyond the reach of these children. They’ll learn this – not because of what teacher says, or what homework assignments they complete – through interaction with the technology itself.
  • We and our technological-materialist culture have fostered an environment of such tremendous novelty and variety that we have changed the equations of childhood.
  • As it turns out (and there are numerous examples to support this) a mobile handset is probably the most important tool someone can employ to improve their economic well-being. A farmer can call ahead to markets to find out which is paying the best price for his crop; the same goes for fishermen. Tradesmen can close deals without the hassle and lost time involved in travel; craftswomen can coordinate their creative resources with a few text messages. Each of these examples can be found in any Bangladeshi city or Africa village.
  • The sharing of information is an innate human behavior: since we learned to speak we’ve been talking to each other, warning each other of dangers, informing each other of opportunities, positing possibilities, and just generally reassuring each other with the sound of our voices. We’ve now extended that four-billion-fold, so that half of humanity is directly connected, one to another.
  • Everything we do, both within and outside the classroom, must be seen through this prism of sharing. Teenagers log onto video chat services such as Skype, and do their homework together, at a distance, sharing and comparing their results. Parents offer up their kindergartener’s presentations to other parents through Twitter – and those parents respond to the offer. All of this both amplifies and undermines the classroom. The classroom has not dealt with the phenomenal transformation in the connectivity of the broader culture, and is in danger of becoming obsolesced by it.
  • We already live in a time of disconnect, where the classroom has stopped reflecting the world outside its walls. The classroom is born of an industrial mode of thinking, where hierarchy and reproducibility were the order of the day. The world outside those walls is networked and highly heterogeneous. And where the classroom touches the world outside, sparks fly; the classroom can’t handle the currents generated by the culture of connectivity and sharing. This can not go on.
  • We must accept the reality of the 21st century, that, more than anything else, this is the networked era, and that this network has gifted us with new capabilities even as it presents us with new dangers. Both gifts and dangers are issues of potency; the network has made us incredibly powerful. The network is smarter, faster and more agile than the hierarchy; when the two collide – as they’re bound to, with increasing frequency – the network always wins.
  • A text message can unleash revolution, or land a teenager in jail on charges of peddling child pornography, or spark a riot on a Sydney beach; Wikipedia can drive Britannica, a quarter millennium-old reference text out of business; a outsider candidate can get himself elected president of the United States because his team masters the logic of the network. In truth, we already live in the age of digital citizenship, but so many of us don’t know the rules, and hence, are poor citizens.
  • before a child is given a computer – either at home or in school – it must be accompanied by instruction in the power of the network. A child may have a natural facility with the network without having any sense of the power of the network as an amplifier of capability. It’s that disconnect which digital citizenship must bridge.
  • Let us instead focus on how we will use technology in fifty years’ time. We can already see the shape of the future in one outstanding example – a website known as RateMyProfessors.com. Here, in a database of nine million reviews of one million teachers, lecturers and professors, students can learn which instructors bore, which grade easily, which excite the mind, and so forth. This simple site – which grew out of the power of sharing – has radically changed the balance of power on university campuses throughout the US and the UK.
  • Alongside the rise of RateMyProfessors.com, there has been an exponential increase in the amount of lecture material you can find online, whether on YouTube, or iTunes University, or any number of dedicated websites. Those lectures also have ratings, so it is already possible for a student to get to the best and most popular lectures on any subject, be it calculus or Mandarin or the medieval history of Europe.
  • As the university dissolves in the universal solvent of the network, the capacity to use the network for education increases geometrically; education will be available everywhere the network reaches. It already reaches half of humanity; in a few years it will cover three-quarters of the population of the planet. Certainly by 2060 network access will be thought of as a human right, much like food and clean water.
  • Educators will continue to collaborate, but without much of the physical infrastructure we currently associate with educational institutions. Classrooms will self-organize and disperse organically, driven by need, proximity, or interest, and the best instructors will find themselves constantly in demand. Life-long learning will no longer be a catch-phrase, but a reality for the billions of individuals all focusing on improving their effectiveness within an ever-more-competitive global market for talent.
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    Mark Pesce: Digital Citizenship and the future of Education.
Kathleen N

The LoTi Digital Age Survey - 0 views

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    We, at LoTi, are proud to announce the release of the free LoTi Digital-Age Survey to all public schools in the United States. The LoTi Digital-Age Survey provides each participant with an empirically-validated tool that creates a personalized Digital-age professional development profile aligned to the NETS for Teachers (NETS-T). This profile offers recommendations aligned to five popular instructional initiatives including (1) Level of Teaching Innovation (LoTi), (2) Partnership for 21st Century Skills, (3) Marzano's Research-based Instructional Practices, (4) Daggett's Rigor & Relevance, and (5) Webb's Depth of Knowledge.
Kerry J

Latest News - Digital Learning - 0 views

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    The digital media and learning initiative acknowledges the emerging vernacular of young people who are "growing up digital" and embraces the writing, thinking, and design digital of the digital age. It is seeking to answer questions such as: Are young people fundamentally different because of their exposure to technology? What environments and experiences capture their interest and contribute to their learning? What are the implications for education? It includes ethnography, the development of media literacy, and the connection between games and learning.
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