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David McGavock

CITE Journal - Editorial - 21 views

  • A classroom that has successfully integrated technology into the curriculum would be one where you would not really notice it because it would be so second nature. The teacher would not have to think up ways to use whatever tools were available, but would seamlessly use them to enhance the learning of whatever content was being covered. technology [would be] used to assist in acquiring content knowledge, and the acquisition of technology skills [would be] secondary. Contrast this depiction with what the International Society for technology in Education’s (ISTE) National Educational technology Standards for Students (NETS-S; ISTE, 2002) say about technology integration: Curriculum integration with the use of technology involves the infusion of technology as a tool to enhance the learning in a content area or multidisciplinary setting….Effective integration of technology is achieved when students are able to select technology tools to help them obtain information in a timely manner, analyze and synthesize the information, and present it professionally. The technology should become an integral part of how the classroom functions—as accessible as all other classroom tools.
  • his urging to shift the focus from the learning tools to what is being learned and how that learning happens still needs to be heeded—almost 20 years later.
  • Integration is defined not by the amount or type of technology used, but by how and why it is used.
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  • many of these technology-specific studies did not explore more fundamental issues in technology and education
  • what needs to be further developed, examined, and shared
  • particular curriculum standards-based instructional strategies that are appropriately matched to students’ learning needs and preferences
  • understanding the processes and interim results of how and why specific tools can and should be appropriated
  • help students with distinct needs and preferences to achieve identified learning goals.
  • the STaR Chart
  • According to the national StaR Chart, then, technology use in what is typically described as “constructivist” learning is preferable to technology used to “reinforce basic academic skills.”
  • Constructivists view people as constructive agents and view the phenomenon of interest (meaning or knowledge) as built instead of passively “received”
  • curriculum-based integration of educational technologies – defined in Education and Technology: An Encyclopedia (Kovalchick & Dawson, 2004) as “the effective integration of Technology throughout the curriculum to help students meet the standards and outcomes of each lesson, unit, or activity”
  • As discerning educators and researchers, we should question why teachers’ roles “must” change to integrate research effectively into K-12 curricula.
  • the technologies themselves do not require this shift
  • Though teachers in the nationally representative sample they studied acknowledged that computers helped them to change instructional practice over time, they cited experience, organized professional learning, and school culture as the primary factors provoking instructional changes.
  • In districts in which teachers’ academic freedom is preserved—at least in part—aren’t the pedagogical approaches to be used the result of decisions that each teacher makes, preferably rooted in a well-informed knowledge base of both students’ learning needs and preferences and corresponding methodological alternatives?
  • Can it really be assumed that a particular approach “works best” in all teaching, learning, school, district, and community contexts?
  • perhaps a new approach is warranted at this point in time—one that genuinely respects pedagogical plurality and honors teachers’ academic freedom.
  •  
    A classroom that has successfully integrated technology into the curriculum would be one where you would not really notice it because it would be so second nature. The teacher would not have to think up ways to use whatever tools were available, but would seamlessly use them to enhance the learning of whatever content was being covered. technology [would be] used to assist in acquiring content knowledge, and the acquisition of technology skills [would be] secondary. Contrast this depiction with what the International Society for technology in Education's (ISTE) National Educational technology Standards for Students (NETS-S; ISTE, 2002) say about technology integration: Curriculum integration with the use of technology involves the infusion of technology as a tool to enhance the learning in a content area or multidisciplinary setting….Effective integration of technology is achieved when students are able to select technology tools to help them obtain information in a timely manner, analyze and synthesize the information, and present it professionally. The technology should become an integral part of how the classroom functions-as accessible as all other classroom tools.
Colleen McGuire

Critical Issue: Using Technology to Improve Student Achievement - 0 views

  • Technologies available in classrooms today range from simple tool-based applications (such as word processors) to online repositories of scientific data and primary historical documents, to handheld computers, closed-circuit television channels, and two-way distance learning classrooms. Even the cell phones that many students now carry with them can be used to learn (Prensky, 2005).
  • Bruce and Levin (1997), for example, look at ways in which the tools, techniques, and applications of technology can support integrated, inquiry-based learning to "engage children in exploring, thinking, reading, writing, technologying, inventing, problem-solving, and experiencing the world." They developed the idea of technology as media with four different focuses: media for inquiry (such as data modeling, spreadsheets, access to online databases, access to online observatories and microscopes, and hypertext), media for communication (such as word processing, e-mail, synchronous conferencing, graphics software, simulations, and tutorials), media for construction (such as robotics, computer-aided design, and control systems), and media for expression (such as interactive video, animation software, and music composition). In a review of existing evidence of technology's impact on learning, Marshall (2002) found strong evidence that educational technology "complements what a great teacher does naturally," extending their reach and broadening their students' experience beyond the classroom. "With ever-expanding content and technology choices, from video to multimedia to the Internet," Marshall suggests "there's an unprecedented need to understand the recipe for success, which involves the learner, the teacher, the content, and the environment in which technology is used."
  • In examining large-scale state and national studies, as well as some innovative smaller studies on newer educational technologies, Schacter (1999) found that students with access to any of a number of technologies (such as computer assisted instruction, integrated learning systems, simulations and software that teaches higher order thinking, collaborative networked technologies, or design and programming technologies) show positive gains in achievement on researcher constructed tests, standardized tests, and national tests.
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  • Boster, Meyer, Roberto, & Inge (2002) examined the integration of standards-based video clips into lessons developed by classroom teachers and found increases student achievement. The study of more than 1,400 elementary and middle school students in three Virginia school districts showed an average increase in learning for students exposed to the video clip application compared to students who received traditional instruction alone.
  • Wenglinsky (1998) noted that for fourth- and eighth-graders technology has "positive benefits" on achievement as measured in NAEP's mathematics test. Interestingly, Wenglinsky found that using computers to teach low order thinking skills, such as drill and practice, had a negative impact on academic achievement, while using computers to solve simulations saw their students' math scores increase significantly. Hiebert (1999) raised a similar point. When students over-practice procedures before they understand them, they have more difficulty making sense of them later; however, they can learn new concepts and skills while they are solving problems. In a study that examined relationship between computer use and students' science achievement based on data from a standardized assessment, Papanastasiou, Zemblyas, & Vrasidas (2003) found it is not the computer use itself that has a positive or negative effect on achievement of students, but the way in which computers are used.
  • Another factor influencing the impact of technology on student achievement is that changes in classroom technologies correlate to changes in other educational factors as well. Originally the determination of student achievement was based on traditional methods of social scientific investigation: it asked whether there was a specific, causal relationship between one thing—technology—and another—student achievement. Because schools are complex social environments, however, it is impossible to change just one thing at a time (Glennan & Melmed, 1996; Hawkins, Panush, & Spielvogel, 1996; Newman, 1990). If a new technology is introduced into a classroom, other things also change. For example, teachers' perceptions of their students' capabilities can shift dramatically when technology is integrated into the classroom (Honey, Chang, Light, Moeller, in press). Also, teachers frequently find themselves acting more as coaches and less as lecturers (Henriquez & Riconscente, 1998). Another example is that use of technology tends to foster collaboration among students, which in turn may have a positive effect on student achievement (Tinzmann, 1998). Because the technology becomes part of a complex network of changes, its impact cannot be reduced to a simple cause-and-effect model that would provide a definitive answer to how it has improved student achievement.
  • When new technologies are adopted, learning how to use the technology may take precedence over learning through the technology. "The technology learning curve tends to eclipse content learning temporarily; both kids and teachers seem to orient to technology until they become comfortable," note Goldman, Cole, and Syer (1999). Effective content integration takes time, and new technologies may have glitches. As a result, "teachers' first technology projects generate excitement but often little content learning. Often it takes a few years until teachers can use technology effectively in core subject areas" (Goldman, Cole, & Syer, 1999). Educators may find impediments to evaluating the impact of technology. Such impediments include lack of measures to assess higher-order thinking skills, difficulty in separating technology from the entire instructional process, and the outdating of technologies used by the school. To address these impediments, educators may need to develop new strategies for student assessment, ensure that all aspects of the instructional process—including technology, instructional design, content, teaching strategies, and classroom environment—are conducive to student learning, and conduct ongoing evaluation studies to determine the effectiveness of learning with technology (Kosakowski, 1998).
Steve Ransom

Technology in Schools Faces Questions on Value - NYTimes.com - 9 views

  • Critics counter that, absent clear proof, schools are being motivated by a blind faith in technology and an overemphasis on digital skills — like using PowerPoint and multimedia tools — at the expense of math, reading and writing fundamentals. They say the technology advocates have it backward when they press to upgrade first and ask questions later.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      A valid criticism when technology implementation is decoupled from meaningful and effective pedagogy. You can't buy measurable change/improvement.
  • district was innovating
  • how the district was innovating.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Again, this is very different than how TEACHERS are innovating their PRACTICES. It's much more challenging than making a slick brochure that communicates how much technology your district has.
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  • there is no good way to quantify those achievements — putting them in a tough spot with voters deciding whether to bankroll this approach again
  • “We’ve jumped on bandwagons for different eras without knowing fully what we’re doing. This might just be the new bandwagon,” he said. “I hope not.”
    • Steve Ransom
       
      There's a confidence building statement for you....
  • $46.3 million for laptops, classroom projectors, networking gear and other technology for teachers and administrators.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Exactly... and how much was spent on equipping teachers to change their practices to effectively leverage this new infrastructure?
  • If we know something works
    • Steve Ransom
       
      And what is that "something"? New technology? If so, you missed the boat.
  • it is hard to separate the effect of the laptops from the effect of the teacher training
  • The high-level analyses that sum up these various studies, not surprisingly, give researchers pause about whether big investments in research make sense.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Why does the argument for making schools relevant and using current cultural tools need to be backed with performance data? Give politicians and superintendents horses instead of cars and see how long that lasts.
  • Good teachers, he said, can make good use of computers, while bad teachers won’t, and they and their students could wind up becoming distracted by the technology.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Finally, a valid point.
  • “Test scores are the same, but look at all the other things students are doing: learning to use the Internet to research, learning to organize their work, learning to use professional writing tools, learning to collaborate with others.”
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Exactly. But somehow, "value" has been equated with test scores alone. Do we have a strong body of research on pencil effectiveness or clay effectiveness or chair effectiveness?
  • “It’s not the stuff that counts — it’s what you do with it that matters.”
  • “There is a connection between the physical hand on the paper and the words on the page,” she said. “It’s intimate.”
  • “They’re inundated with 24/7 media, so they expect it,”
    • Steve Ransom
       
      And you expect them to always engage enthusiastically with tools that are no longer relevant in their culture?
  • The 30 students in the classroom held wireless clickers into which they punched their answers. Seconds later, a pie chart appeared on the screen: 23 percent answered “True,” 70 percent “False,” and 6 percent didn’t know.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Okay... and you follow up with a totally trivial example of the power of technology in learning.
  • term” that can slide past critical analysis.
  • engagement is a “fluffy
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Very true
  • rofessor Cuban at Stanford argues that keeping children engaged requires an environment of constant novelty, which cannot be sustained.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      If that is so, why not back up your claim by linking to the source here. I have a feeling he has been misquoted and taken out of context here.
  • that computers can distract and not instruct.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Computers don't really "instruct". That's why we have teachers who are supposed to know what they are doing and why they are doing it... and monitoring kids while keeping learning meaningful.
  • guide on the side.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      But many teachers are simply not prepared for how to do this effectively. To ignore this fact is just naive.
  • Professor Cuban at Stanford
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Are they in love with Cuban or something? Perhaps they should actually look at the research... or interview other authorities. Isn't that what reporting is all about? I think this reporter must be a product of too much Google, right?
  • But she loves the fact that her two children, a fourth-grader and first-grader, are learning technology, including PowerPoint
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Again, the fact that any supporter is happy that their kids are learning PowerPoint illustrates the degree of naiveté in their understanding of technology's role in learning.
  • creating an impetus to rethink education entirely
  • Mr. Share bases his buying decisions on two main factors: what his teachers tell him they need, and his experience. For instance, he said he resisted getting the interactive whiteboards sold as Smart Boards until, one day in 2008, he saw a teacher trying to mimic the product with a jury-rigged projector setup. “It was an ‘Aha!’ moment,” he said, leading him to buy Smart Boards, made by a company called Smart Technologies.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Herein lies another huge problem. Mr. Director of Technology seems to base no decisions on what the learning and Technology literature have to say... nor does he consult those who would be considered authorities on Technology infused learning (emphasis on learning here)
  • This is big business.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      No kidding.
  • “Do we really need technology to learn?” she said. “It’s a very valid time to ask the question, right before this goes on the ballot.”
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Anyone who asks that should volunteer to have their home and work computer confiscated. After all, it's just a distraction, right?
Tero Toivanen

How One Classroom Actually Used iPads To Go Paperless (Part 1: Research) | Edudemic - 53 views

  • “The technology used really help to enhance the writing and technology process. Diigo and the iPads proved to be particularly helpful during the process of technologying and annotating. Some minor challenges were presented with the use of this technology (writing with the IPads was a bit more difficult than typing on a computer), but nothing interfered with the process in a negative way. Some of the technology could prove very useful in the future.” 
  • Dropbox - This app allows students to work offline in the Pages app and upload their document to their Dropbox account with each new draft.  Pages does not support direct upload to Dropbox.  As a solution, students linked their Dropbox accounts with SendtoDropbox.
  • One of the earliest steps in the process was to have the students share a folder in their Dropbox account with their teacher in order to allow the teacher to check in on their progress along the way.
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  • Pages - While there are less expensive alternatives for word procession on an iPad, Pages is the most stable option that will consistently be supported and updated for the life of the iPads.
  • Diigo Web Highlighter for Safari - As one of our goals was to take advantage of the web connectivity and social bookmarking, Diigo was a perfect solution.  Once the Diigo app is installed, there is a three step process to install the Safari web highlighter.
  • To access and refer to each other’s research, students had to access Diigo through Safari, not the Diigo app.  The purpose of the collective research group was to have students examine each other’s research and use the resources their classmates found in their final research paper.
  • Notability - Because students would still be conducting traditional paper based research, we needed a solution that would allow them to digitize and share their research.  When students found traditional paper content that was part of their research, they could snap a picture of the document and pull it into Notability.  They could then digitally highlight, underline and insert notes on the document.  Notability will also export directly to Dropbox from within the app.
  • Explain Everything - This step was a late addition to the process and allowed students to create video screencasting feedback of each other’s papers.
  • Students exported a PDF version of their paper from Pages and email it to a classmates SendtoDropbox email address.  This would place the PDF version of the paper into the classmates Dropbox account.  The receiving student could then open ExplainEverything, link to their Dropbox account and use the PDF of their classmates paper as the back drop to the screencast.  To share the video files, we had students publish directly to the teacher’s YouTube channel from ExplainEverything. 
  • the recent update to the Google Drive app that allows for in-app creation, editing and sharing of a Google document absolutely changes the landscape of going completely paperless with iPads.  The clunky workaround of combining Pages, SendtoDropbox and Dropbox in order to get student work shared with the teacher would be much streamlined by conducting the entire process through Google Drive.
  • As an alternative to the process of writing in Pages, collecting research in Diigo and storing documents in Dropbox, I would consider jumping to Evernote to house the entire process.  Writing, researching and sharing could all be conducted within Evernote.
  •  
    Great article about how to use iPad:s in projects, with useful tips about apps.
Anne Bubnic

New U.S. Research Center to Study Education Research - 0 views

  •  
    Congress has authorized a new federal research center that will be charged with helping to develop innovative ways to use digital research at schools and in universities. The National Center for research in Advanced Information and Digital Technologies was included as part of the latest reauthorization Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader of the Higher Education Act, approved last month. President Bush signed the law on Aug. 14. The center will be charged with supporting research and development of new education technologies, including internet-based technologies. It will also help adapt techniques already widely used in other sectors, such as advertising and the military, to classroom instruction.
Ihering Alcoforado

Mind, Brain, & Education - 1 views

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    Solution Tree, a leading educational professional development company, has released Mind, Brain, & Education, a new book that explores neuroscience's implications for improving teaching and education.Mind, Brain, & Education is a landmark publication in the emerging field of educational neuroscience. The book showcases insights into the learning process and explores its implications for educational theory and practice. With an introduction and chapter by David A. Sousa, one of the primary researchers in the field, and chapters by 16 leading experts, Mind, Brain, & Education provides a comprehensive overview of the history and current research being conducted in this emerging field.The researchers who contribute to the volume use the growing knowledge of how the brain functions and develops to explore the field's implications for pedagogy and the classroom. "It's an excellent, timely, informative book on the history and current status of the field that has come to be known as educational neuroscience," said Robert Sylwester, emeritus professor of education at the University of Oregon. "The 10 chapters that constitute the heart of the book were written by a wonderful mix of outstanding researchers and educators, from Michael I. Posner, a renowned pioneer in the use of neuroimaging research in psychology/education and the recipient of the 2009 National Medal of Science, to Judy Willis, who left a career as a neurologist to become an elementary/middle school teacher." Mind, Brain, & Education is the sixth book in the Leading Edge™ series. The Leading Edge™ series unites education authorities from around the globe and asks them to confront the important issues that affect teachers and administrators-the issues that profoundly impact student success
Maggie Verster

Revolutionizing Education: What We're Learning from Technology-Transformed Schools - 24 views

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    "In this eBook, Project RED - a national research and advocacy effort - shares preliminary results from a survey of research-rich schools and takes a look at what past research and current observation tells us about the keys to successful research implementation. What do we know about curriculum reform or the leadership, funding and legislation changes that will allow research to transform learning and schools, just as it has transformed homes and offices in almost every other segment of our society? "
Maggie Wolfe Riley

Education - Change.org: Tutorial: Two Uses of Technology to Improve Literacy and Critical Thinking - 0 views

  • It's easy, efficient, and turbo-effective literacy, research, and information management. It's unique to the Berners-Lee Age. Gutenberg would have loved it. Some high-profile "researchers" apparently know little of it.
  •  
    two examples showing how blind the UCLA research was to today's possibilities, how behind the times.... It's easy, efficient, and turbo-effective literacy, research, and information management. It's unique to the Berners-Lee Age. Gutenberg would have loved it. Some high-profile "researchers" apparently know little of it.
Tero Toivanen

Why boys will pick Bob over Barbie - children are genetically programmed, say scientists | Mail Online - 0 views

  • Tests involving children as young as three months suggest biological differences and not social pressures dictate which toys children like to play with. The U.S. study looked at babies aged three to eight months - before they can identify even the gender of other people.
  • Researchers placed a doll and truck inside a puppet-theatre style box and showed them to 30 children - 17 boys and 13 girls - for two ten-second intervals.The findings, from Researchers at Texas A&M University, overturn conventional wisdom that children's toy preferences are down to social conditioning.
  • For the study, led by Gerianne Alexander, researchers set up a presentation box similar to a puppet theatre and placed a doll and truck inside.
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  • Eye-tracking technology measured how many times and how long the babies focused or 'fixated' on each object.
  • The researchers found that 'girls showed a visual preference for the doll over the toy truck and boys compared to girls showed a greater number of visual fixations on the truck'.
  • It seems unlikely that object interests in infants younger than nine months of age are a result of internal motivation to conform to external referents of gender role behaviour.
  • The study reinforces the findings of previous research by Dr Alexander involving green vervet monkeys. Male monkeys spent more time playing with traditional male toys such as a car and a ball than did female monkeys. The female monkeys, however, spent more time playing with a doll and a pot than did the males. 
  •  
    The researchers found that 'girls showed a visual preference for the doll over the toy truck and boys compared to girls showed a greater number of visual fixations on the truck'.
LaDawna Harrington

Shaping the Learning Environment - 0 views

FREE Webinar 4/17 | Guided Research Join us for the next LMC @ The Forefront webinar! Guided Research: Shaping the Learning Environment by Being observANT Wednesday, April 17, 2013 - 4pm / Eastern ...

Inquiry Guided Research Technology Digital Learning teaching collaboration education

started by LaDawna Harrington on 14 Apr 13 no follow-up yet
Neil O'Sullivan

Technology Integration Technology Review | Edutopia - 1 views

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    Technology Integration Technology Review
Greg Brandenburg

edublogs: Ken Robinson's The Element: reincarnating creativity - 1 views

  • We also need to recognise that, largely, those teachers who use technology the most effectively and lead the way with its use are also, by and large, excellent teachers with or without the technology.This helps us see what many of us appreciate already: the one biggest element of improving education, making learning more creatively inclined and entrepreneurial, is the teacher. It's not curriculum, class sizes (though smaller class sizes make the teacher's life easier) or even assessment. This is something I've been reporting back from technology for two years (and which I've been blown out on more times than I can count). It's not about letting students lead the way with technology and "show us teachers" how it's done. Students are generally quite narrow in their knowledge of how to harness technology or creative venture.No, it's how teachers and parents teach that is important. It is, to use a piece of edu-jargon, pedagogy, both at school and at home.
    • Sheri Edwards
       
      Pedagogy Innovation Creativity Understanding Entrepreneurship PICUE
  • with students batched by age and subject to standardised tests for quality before shipping to the real world. Conformity has thus always had a higher value than diversity
    • Greg Brandenburg
       
      I've not objected to standardized tests as there needs to be some accountability. But, when you put it this way, it does sound like the education factory.
  •  
    We also need to recognise that, largely, those teachers who use technology the most effectively and lead the way with its use are also, by and large, excellent teachers with or without the technology. This helps us see what many of us appreciate already: the one biggest element of improving education, making learning more creatively inclined and entrepreneurial, is the teacher. It's not curriculum, class sizes (though smaller class sizes make the teacher's life easier) or even assessment. This is something I've been reporting back from technology for two years (and which I've been blown out on more times than I can count). It's not about letting students lead the way with technology and "show us teachers" how it's done. Students are generally quite narrow in their knowledge of how to harness technology or creative venture. No, it's how teachers and parents teach that is important. It is, to use a piece of edu-jargon, pedagogy, both at school and at home.
Kerry J

The neuroscience of online learning Registration, Adelaide - Eventbrite - 22 views

  •  
    Neuroscience has shown that our brains are plastic and that education, gaming and the use of technology can change our brains' connectivity, function and structure. (1, 2) But learning is more than just biology - it is affected by our learning environment and the people with whom and from whom we learn. So how do you take what neuroscience reveals about the plastic, learning brain and combine it with educational technology, expertise and common sense? Klevar, in association with Flinders University, are offering you the chance to explore this with Dr Paul Howard-Jones of the University of Bristol, technologyer and author of "Introducing Neuroeducational technology: Neuroscience, Education and the Brain from Contexts to Practice".
Jeff Johnson

Generation YES » Youth & Educators Succeeding - 0 views

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    GenYES is an innovative program that creates 21st century leaders and learners. GenYES students help teachers use technology in classrooms, supporting effective technology integration school-wide. Eleven years of technology proves GenYES empowers students and changes the way teachers integrate technology in their lessons.
Dennis Richards

Horizon Report 2010 K-12 Edition - 17 views

  •  
    The Horizon Report series is the most visible outcome of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, an ongoing research effort established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, research, or creative expression within education around the globe. This volume, the 2010 Horizon Report: K-12 Edition, examines emerging technologies for their potential impact on and use in teaching, learning, and creative expression within the environment of pre-college education.
lisandro mierez

genome.gov | Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms - 0 views

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    The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) created the Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms to help everyone understand the terms and concepts used in genetic Research. In addition to definitions, specialists in the field of genetics share their descriptions of terms, and many terms include images, animation and links to related terms.
  •  
    The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) created the Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms to help everyone understand the terms and concepts used in genetic Research. In addition to definitions, specialists in the field of genetics share their descriptions of terms, and many terms include images, animation and links to related terms.
Maung Nyeu

Cyberlearning Research Summit - Cyberlearning - 0 views

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    The Cyberlearning Research Summit will take place in Washington DC, with speakers from industry and academia, who will share visions for the future of learning with emerging technologies. Topics include role of emerging Research in learning, individualized learning, augmented reality, and many others topics covered in T561. HGSE Faculty Dr. Todd Rose will also be a speaker.
Maggie Verster

Teachers Report Educational Benefits of Frequent Technology Use - 14 views

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    Teachers who use technology frequently in their classrooms perceive greater benefits to student learning--particularly learning 21st century skills--than teachers who are less frequent users. That's one of the major findings from a K-12 technology study released Monday by technologyers out of the Richard W. Riley College of Education and Leadership at Minnesota's Walden University.
Jacques Cool

Assessment, Technology, and Change - 0 views

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    In this article, the authors present a model for how technology can provide more observations about student learning than current assessments. To illustrate this approach, the authors describe their early technology on using immersive technologies to develop virtual performance assessments.
Dwayne Abrahams

Research - 17 views

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    "Footsteps2Brilliance, Inc.™'s Academic Language Program for Students (ALPS) delivers a robust library of stimulating ebooks and educational games to parents, children and teachers anywhere/anytime through innovative mobile gaming technology. Developed by educational experts usingthe latest technology on cognitive development, ALPS provides young learners with 1,000 essential vocabulary words through interactive eBooks that are sure to engage today's digital students whether at school or home."
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