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Nigel Coutts

Contemplating questions of work questions balance - The Learner's Way - 3 views

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    Oddly lately I have been pondering how schools responds to the question of a work life balance. Let me try to explain my thinking. I am still trying to clarify my thinking here, so please bear with me. What does it mean to achieve work life balance, and should we want to?
Melissa Seifman

Education Outrage: Why do we still have schools? - 1 views

  • Competition: Why should school be a competitive event?
  • We learn what we choose to know in real life.
  • Stress: When 6 year olds are stressed about going to school you know that something is wrong.
  • ...32 more annotations...
  • Right answers: School teaches that there are right answers.
  • But, in real life, there are very few right answers.
  • Bullying and peer pressure
  • In school there are always other kids telling you how to dress, how to act, how to be cool.
  • Stifling of curiosity: Isn’t it obvious that learning is really about curiosity?
  • Adults earn about things they want to learn about. Before the age of 6, prior to school, one kid becomes a dinosaur specialist while another knows all about dog breeds. Outside of school people drive their own learning. Schools eliminate this natural behavior.
    • Tero Toivanen
       
      Exactly!
  • Subjects chosen for you:
  • Classrooms:
  • Classrooms make no sense as a venue for learning unless of course you want to save money and have 30 (or worse hundreds of) students be handled by one teacher.
  • Schools cannot work as places of learning if they employ classrooms.
  • Grades: Any professor can tell you that students are pretty much concerned with whether what you are telling them will be on the test and what they might do for extra credit.
    • Melissa Seifman
       
      I disagree - Employers do have rating systems, performance evaluations, but most of those are on the whole person, not just technical or academic skills
  • Parents do not give grades to children and employers do not give grades to employees. They judge their work and progress for sure, but not by assigning numbers to a report card.
  • Certification: We all know why people attend college. They do primarily to say they are college graduates so they can get a job or go on to a professional school.
    • Caroline Roche
       
      So, why is this the student's fault? Why blame, or disadvatage them for this? We should be fighting the system that causes students to work like this, not blaming them for doing it! it is the constant testing and league table system that is wrong.
  • Confined children: Children like to run around.
  • Of course in school, sitting still is the norm. So we have come up with this wonderful idea of ADD, i.e. drug those who won’t sit still into submission. Is the system sick or what?
  • Academics viewed as winners: Who are the smartest kids in school?
  • Those who are good at these subjects go on to be professors. So those are certainly the smartest people we have in our society.
  • But, I can tell you from personal experience that our society doesn’t respect professors all that much, so something is wrong here.
  • Practical skills not valued: When I was young there were academic high schools and trade high schools. Trade high schools were for dumb kids. Academic high schools were for smart kids.
  • The need to please teachers: People who succeed at school are invariably people who are good out at figuring what the teacher wants and giving it to them.
  • In real life there is no teacher to please and these “grade grubbers” often find themselves lost.
  • Self worth questioned: School is full of winners and losers.
  • In school, most everyone sees themselves as a loser. Why do we allow this to happen?
  • Politicians in charge: Politicians demand reform but they wouldn’t know reform if it hit them over the head.
  • Major learning by doing mechanism ignored: And last but not least, scholars from Plato to Dewey have pointed that people learn by doing. That is how we learn. Doing. Got it? Apparently not. Very little doing in schools. Unless you count filling in circles with number 2 pencils as doing.
  • Government use of education for repression: As long as there have been governments there have been governments who wanted people to think that the governments (and the country) is very good.
  • School is about teaching “truth.”
  • Discovery not valued: The most important things we learn we teach ourselves.
    • Tero Toivanen
       
      Autotelic learning!
  • This kind of learning is not valued in school because it might lead to, heaven forbid, failure, and failure is a really bad word in school. Except failure is how we learn, which is pretty much why school doesn’t work.
    • Tero Toivanen
       
      Exactly!
  • Boredom ignored: Boredom is a bad thing. We drug bored kids with Ritalin so they will stop being bored.
  • What they mean is that school should be like they remember rather than how it is now
    • Caroline Roche
       
      Not accepting students with straight A's only shows your own prejudices. Students can be good at a range of subjects, without being passionately interested in all of them. Lots of people are self motivated, without being teacher pleasers, they just wish to do their best in everything for their own satisfaction.
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    Why do we have schools? Instead of answering this question by listing all the good things that schools provide, which anyone can do, I will turn the question around: What is bad about having schools?
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    Why do we have schools? Instead of answering this question by listing all the good things that schools provide, which anyone can do, I will turn the question around: What is bad about having schools?
justquestionans

Ashford-University ECE 332 Homework and Assignment Help - 1 views

Get help for Ashford-University ECE 332 Homework and Assignment Help. We provide assignment, homework, discussions and case studies help for all subjects Ashford-University for Session 2017-2018. ...

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started by justquestionans on 27 Jun 18 no follow-up yet
BTerres

TeachersFirst XW1W (Across the World Once a Week) - 0 views

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    XW1W uses today's instant technologies to share answers to the same question across the world once a week. XW1W is a simple, social way for students to learn about real life in other cultures from real kids all across the world. By simply "hashtagging" Twitter or blog responses to a weekly question about daily life, students can share and learn about other cultures from their international peers
Nigel Coutts

Making Compassion the Fifth C of Learning - The Learner's Way - 9 views

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    The question of what learning matters most to our students is one that I return to regularly. A fascinating range of models are available each with similar elements but presented in a slightly different manner. Most could be summarised by the 'Four C's' model outlined in 'Most Likely to Succeed' by Tony Wagner and Ted Dintersmith. Critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity are vital and each plays an important role in allowing us to manage the complexity of modern day life. Beyond being relevant to success in the classroom the Four C's are the foundations of life-long learning but I question if alone they are enough. I believe we must include a fifth; compassion.
Nigel Coutts

Educating for the Unknown - The Learner's Way - 6 views

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    What will tomorrow bring? What will life be like in 2028 as our youngest students of today exit school? What occupations will they enter and what challenges will they face? These are not new life but with the rate of change in society and the pace at which technology evolves they are life without clear answers. How then do schools prepare students for this uncertain tomorrow? What shall we teach our children today such that are well prepared for the challenges and opportunities of their tomorrow?
Nigel Coutts

Sharing our Puzzles of Practice - The Learner's Way - 5 views

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    Einstein is often quoted as having said "If I have an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes." Clearly Einstein understood how to attack puzzling problems. As teachers we face a host of puzzles on a daily basis. Every student we teach, thanks to their idiosyncrasies presents a unique puzzle. The interactions between students further complicates things. Our goals for our learners, their learning needs, the demands of the curriculum, pressures from beyond the classroom all result in puzzles for us to manage and to solve.
Jennifer Barnett

This is Your Life: A Mid-Life Dream Check, Part One - 36 views

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    Thinking about Switchfoot's song brought on some deep reflection. This brought me to digital portfolios, Maslow's hierarchy, and how I might answer the song's central question.
James OReilly

Versatile, Immersive, Creative and Dynamic Virtual 3-D Healthcare Learning Environments: A Review of the Literature | Hansen | Journal of Medical Internet Research - 0 views

shared by James OReilly on 13 Dec 08 - Cached
  • Virtual 3-D Healthcare Learning Environments
  • The author provides a critical overview of three-dimensional (3-D) virtual worlds and “serious gaming” that are currently being developed and used in healthcare professional education and medicine.
  • Roger’s Diffusion of Innovations Theory
  • ...32 more annotations...
  • Siemens’ Connectivism Theory
  • accelerating momentum
  • there are some fundamental questions which remain unanswered.
  • it is beneficial to address while the race to adopt and implement highly engaging Web 3-D virtual worlds is watched in healthcare professional education
  • Therefore, Roger’s Diffusion of Innovations Theory [5] and Siemens’ Connectivism Theory [6] for today’s learners will serve as theoretical frameworks for this paper.
  • A 3-D virtual world, also known as a Massively Multiplayer Virtual World (MMVW), is an example of a Web 2.0/Web 3-D dynamic computer-based application.
  • applications that enable social publishing, such as blogs and wikis
  • the most popular virtual world used by the general public is Linden Lab’s Second Life (SL)
  • Who would imagine attending medical school in a virtual world?
  • US agencies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health conduct meetings in SL to discuss the educational potential of SL
  • virtual medical universities exist all over the world
  • The term “avatar” is an old Sanskrit word portraying a deity which takes on a human shape
  • Trauma Center
  • Virtual worlds are currently being used as educational spaces [1] and continue to grow in popularity on campuses and businesses worldwide. Furthermore, access to versions of virtual worlds on the Web, such as “Croquet,” “Uni-Verse,” and “Multiverse” are predicted within two to three years to be mainstream in education
  • there are reported advantages to having students engage in these emerging technologies
  • By allowing students time to interact with other avatars (eg, patients, staff members, and other healthcare professionals) in a safe, simulated environment, a decrease in student anxiety, an increase in competency in learning a new skill, and encouragement to cooperate and collaborate, as well as resolve conflicts, is possible.
  • High quality 3-D entertainment that is freely accessible via Web browsing facilitates engagement opportunities with individuals or groups of people in an authentic manner that illustrates collective intelligence
  • Advanced Learning and Immersive Virtual Environment (ALIVE) at the University of Southern Queensland
  • health information island
  • Problem-based learning groups enrolled in a clinical management course at Coventry University meet in SL and are employed to build learning facilities for the next semester of SL students. This management course teaches students to manage healthcare facilities and is reported to be the first healthcare-related class to use SL as a learning environment.
  • Another example of a medical school using SL is St. George’s Medical School in London.
  • Stanford University medical school
  • Another virtual world project developed by staff at the Imperial College in London, in collaboration with the National Physical Lab in the United Kingdom, is the Second Health Project
  • Mesko [35] presents the top 10 virtual medical sites in SL.
  • The development and use of 3-D virtual worlds in nursing education is increasing.
  • Some educators may balk at adopting this technology because there is a learning curve associated with the use of 3-D virtual worlds.
  • Let’s have fun, explore these fascinating worlds and games, and network with others while respecting diverse ways of life-long learning and current researchers’ findings.
  • there is an underlying push in higher education to adopt these collaborative tools and shift the paradigm from a traditional Socratic method of education to one possessing a more active and interactive nature
  • One may view online virtual worlds and serious gaming as a threat to the adoption and purchase of high-fidelity computerized patient-simulation mannequins that are currently purchased for healthcare-profession training. For example, nurses may login into SL and learn Advanced Cardiac Life Support at their convenience, and it costs virtually nothing for the nurse and perhaps a nominal fee for the developer.
  • The educational opportunity in SL may not be a replacement for the doctor- or nurse-patient interaction or relationship, but SL may serve as an adjunct or pre- or post-learning tool.
  • one recalls when critics questioned the validity and reliability of the stethoscope invented by Laennec in 1816 and how today it is second nature to use this assessment tool.
  • 2006 health fair
Debra Spear

Start a Life Hacker Club at Your School - Getting Smart by Adam Renfro - club, goals, Life hacker | Getting Smart - 0 views

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    Sounds like a great idea - helps answer the question, "What is technology really for?" Pursue dreams? Discover full potential? Realize opportunities?
soniya shrma

Self-development: 10 Questions You Should Ask To Yourself - 0 views

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    Be all you can, but not always. I often see myself in the somewhat satisfied with my life things, but of course it is difficult to think of anything else when where are real issues to be discussed.
Anne Cole

Suryaputra Karn - 27th July, 2015 - Watch Online - 0 views

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    In This episode, Karna races to the tribal boss and asks for his moms life yet the boss declines to hear him out. In the interim, Shanidev life Suryadev in regards to Karna's inconveniences yet Suryadev is sure that Karna will beat each sort of troubles. A while later, Karna meets a sage, who advises him of an approach to cure his withering mother however for that Karna is compelled to escape from the tribals. Will Karna at the end of the day get his bow for the purpose of his mom? Find Out here.
Fabian Aguilar

American Cultures 2.0 - 0 views

  • If we want students to become citizens who understand their role as a citizen then we need to teach them to understand and respect the power of questions.
  • Without the freedom and courage to ask that paradigm shifting question then progress and innovation would cease to exist and we would become slaves to our past and out-dated solutions.
  • The power of just one word can totally change the meaning of something as intrinsic as national identity.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • The more students have an opportunity to read, speak and write the more they are going to understand the power of words.
  • The moment students craft words meant not just for the teacher and a few other peers, but for the wider world, is the moment students learn that a misplaced, mispronounced, or misspelled word has consequences far beyond a grade. These authentic learning opportunities are crucial to prepare students for the new realities of a more global and transparent world.
  • Students (and teachers) need to understand that everything they do communicates, whether they know what they are communicating or not.
  • Once students really figure out who they are and what they stand for then they can more comfortably be themselves. However, an important social skill that many students have difficulty grasping is knowing appropriate social norms in various settings.
  • Anyone can be a teacher... if you are alert and willing to learn from others. We need to teach students to be alert and willing to learn from sources other than textbooks. We need to teach students how to create and cultivate learning from a personal learning network, in order to extend the traditional capabilities of school from the limited hours of the school day to the unlimited hours beyond the school day. The informal classroom of life offers lessons far more valuable than the classroom if only we are open to learning from each other each and every day.
Ehsan Ullah

Who Was Steve Jobs? A Great Book For Kids - 0 views

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    It may not be an easy question to answer when your kid ask you "Who was Steve Jobs?" But there's a book which is tackling that subject in a kid-friendly way.
jodi tompkins

EduDemic » 41 New Ways Google Docs Makes Your Life Easier - 0 views

  • New version of Google documents
  • The new version has chat, character-by-character real time co-editing, and makes imports and exports much better
  • Over the next couple of weeks, they’re rolling out the ability to upload, store, and share any file in Google Docs
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • Forms: Add pages and allow navigation to a specific page within a form
  • Shared folders
  • Bulk upload
  • Forms improvements
  • They’ve added a new question type (grid), support for right-to-left languages in forms, and a new color scheme for the forms summary. Also, you can now pre-populate form fields with URL parameters, and if you use Google Apps, you can create forms which require sign-in to access
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    Google Docs newest features
mbarek Akaddar

PISA - 24 views

  • Are students well prepared for future challenges? Can they analyse, reason and communicate effectively? Do they have the capacity to continue learning throughout life? The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) answers these life and more, through its surveys of 15-year-olds in the principal industrialised countries. Every three years, it assesses how far students near the end of compulsory education have acquired some of the knowledge and skills essential for full participation in society.
Admission Times

LIC & GIC Insurance Examinations 2014 - 0 views

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    The exams are conducted from May - July 2014. Following are exam details - Like & Share - www.facebook.com/theadmissiontimes
dsatkins1981

The Forgotten Childhood: Why Early Memories Fade : Shots - Health News : NPR - 0 views

  • "What we found was that even as young as the second year of life, children had very robust memories for these specific past events,"
  • "Why is it that as adults we have difficulty remembering that period of our lives?"
  • More studies provided evidence that at some point in childhood, people lose access to their early memories.
  • ...12 more annotations...
  • children as old as 7 could still recall more than 60 percent of those early events
  • children who were 8 or 9 recalled less than 40 percent.
  • we observed was actually the onset of childhood amnesia,"
  • still not entirely clear why early memories are so fragile
  • Some early memories are more likely than others to survive childhood amnesia
  • One example, she says, is a memory that carries a lot of emotion.
  • "They want to be cooperative," she says, "so you have to be very careful not to put words in their mouth."
    • dsatkins1981
       
      It seems that any role that an adult plays in helping to re-tell, frame, and contextualize a memory in order to bring it to the surface or to make it last must be gentle and organic. We're not talking about rote memorization of past events - can you imagine the trauma from that at home or school let alone in a court room? Some things you wouldn't want to remember.
  • Another powerful determinant of whether an early memory sticks is whether a child fashions it into a good story, with a time and place and a coherent sequence of events, Peterson says. "Those are the kinds of memories that are going to last," she says.
  • And it turns out parents play a big role in what a child remembers, Peterson says. Research shows that when a parent helps a child give shape and structure and context to a memory, it's less likely to fade away.
  • At first, he just talked about it with her.
    • dsatkins1981
       
      Talking through and eventually encouraging writing about past events - preferably pleasant memories - seems like a great way to help students build a repository of lasting childhood remembrances. I can recall my Mom and Dad saying things like, "We had a great day today didn't we? We got up so early! Didn't Dad make an excellent breakfast? Eggs and bacon. That bacon was so crispy. Don't you think that the smell of a good breakfast cooking makes it easier to get up?" Just an example, and I included the kind of leading questions a lawyer would want to avoid if this was about more than breakfast, but my folks were inviting we the children to enter the conversation as a valued part of the kind of reminiscing that adults may do after a nice day. It was just conversation but I can remember loads of them. And there was plenty of time for us to respond and share.
  • school writing assignments.
  • when our own memories start to fail, Peterson says, we rely on family members, photo albums and videos to restore them.
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    How studying childhood amnesia is leading to changes in the way we think about brain development, learning, and memory --- this article mentions implications in the home and in the courts but it also seems relevant to the classroom
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