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Ian Woods

AJET 26(3) Drexler (2010) - The networked student model for construction of personal learning environments: Balancing teacher control and student autonomy - 17 views

    • jordi guim
       
      Muy interesante sobre PLE / PLN
  • Table 2: Personal learning environment toolset learning application (networked student component) Tool used in test case Student activity level of structure Social bookmarking (RSS) Delicious http://delicious.com/ Set up the account Subscribe to each others accounts Bookmark and read 10 reliable learningsites that reflect the learning of chosen topic Add and read at least 3 additional sites each week. News and blog alert (RSS) Google Alert http://www.google.com/alerts Create a Google Alert of keywords associated with selected topic Read news and blogs on that topic that are delivered via email daily Subscribe to appropriate blogs in reader News and blog reader (RSS) Google Reader http://reader.google.com Search for blogs devoted to chosen topic Subscribe to blogs to keep track of updates Personal blog (RSS) Blogger http://www.blogger.com Create a personal blog Post a personal reflection each day of the learning found and experiences related to the use of personal learning environment Students subscribe to each others blogs in reader Internet search (information management, contacts, and synchronous communication) Google Scholar http://scholar.google.com/ Conduct searches in Google Scholar and library databases for scholarly works. Bookmark appropriate sites Consider making contact with expert for video conference Podcasts (RSS) iTunesU http://www.apple.com/itunes/ whatson/itunesu.html Search iTunesU for podcasts related to topic Subscribe to at least 2 podcasts if possible Video conferencing (contacts and synchronous communication) Skype http://www.skype.com Identify at least one learning matter expert to invite to Skype with the class. learning gathering/ digital notebook Evernote http://evernote.com/ Set up account Use Evernote to take notes on all learning collected via other tools learning synthesis Wikispaces http://www.wikispaces.com Post final project on personal page of class wiki The process and tools are overwhelming to students if presented all at once. As with any instructional design, the teacher determines the pace at which the students best assimilate each new learning tool. For this particular project, a new tool was introduced each day over two weeks. Once the construction process was complete, there were a number of personal learning page aggregators that could have been selected to bring everything together in one place. Options at the time included iGoogle, PageFlakes, NetVibes, and Symbaloo. These sites offer a means to compile or pull together learning from a variety of learning applications. A learning widget or gadget is a bit of code that is executed within the personal learning page to pull up external learning from other sites. The students in this case designed the personal learning page using the gadgets needed in the format that best met their learning goals. Figure 3 is an instructor example of a personal learningpage that includes the reader, email, personal blog, note taking program, and social bookmarks on one page.
  • The personal learning environment can take the place of a traditional textbook, though does not preclude the student from using a textbook or accessing one or more numerous open source texts that may be available for the research topic. The goal is to access learning from many sources to effectively meet the learning objectives. The next challenge is to determine whether those objectives have been met.
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  • AssessmentThere were four components of the assessment process for this test case of the Networked Student Model: (1) Ongoing performance assessment in the form of weekly assignments to facilitate the construction and maintenance of the personal learning environment, (2) rubric-based assessment of the personal learning environment at the end of the project, (3) written essay, and (4) multimedia synthesis of topic learning. Points were earned for meeting the following requirements: Identify ten reliable resources and post to social bookmarking account. At least three new resources should be added each week. Subscribe and respond to at least 3 new blogs each week. Follow these blogs and news alerts using the reader. Subscribe to and listen to at least two podcasts (if available). Respectfully contact and request a video conference from a learning matter expert recognised in the field. Maintain daily notes and highlight resources as needed in digital notebook. Post at least a one-paragraph reflection in personal blog each day. At the end of the project, the personal learning environment was assessed with a rubric that encompassed each of the items listed above. The student's ability to synthesise the research was further evaluated with a reflective essay. Writing shapes thinking (Langer & Applebee, 1987), and the essay requirement was one more avenue through which the students demonstrated higher order learning. The personal blog provided an opportunity for regular reflection during the course of the project. The essay was the culmination of the reflections along with a thoughtful synthesis of the learning experience. Students were instructed to articulate what was learned about the selected topic and why others should care or be concerned. The essay provided an overview of everything learned about the contemporary issue. It was well organised, detailed, and long enough to serve as a resource for others who wished to learn from the work. As part of a final exam, the students were required to access the final projects of their classmates and reflect on what they learned from this exposure. The purpose of this activity was to give the students an additional opportunity to share and learn from each other. Creativity is considered a key 21st century skill (Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2009). A number of emerging learning applications support the academic creative process. Students in this project used learning tools to combine text, video, audio, and photographs to teach the research topics to others. The final multimedia project was posted or embedded on the student's personal wiki page. Analysis and assessment of student work was facilitated by the very technologies in use by the students. In order to follow their progress, the teacher simply subscribed to student social bookmarking accounts, readers, and blogs. Clicking through daily contributions was relatively quick and efficient.
Jeff Johnson

Crossroads in Education: Issues for Web 2.0, Social Software, and Digital Tools - 1 views

  •  
    We are at a crossroads in educating our youth. Since public schools became the norm for education, we've identified curriculum based on the social, political, and economic need. We've classified what counts into tight packages of content in content areas as math, science, social studies, and so on. Echoing Owen, Grant, Sayers, and Facer (2006), our approach to teaching and content, including the order and how information is presented to students, the stages of assessment and what constitutes appropriate discussion on those contents have also been tightly defined (p. 31). Advancements in technology, principally content 2.0, social software, and digital tools, have challenged what it means to be educated and how we proceed to educate our youth in a culture where innovation and creativity, lifelong content, personalization (my own content space), and knowledge from and with the collective vie for a rightful place.
Amanda Marrinan

From Knowledgable to Knowledge-able: Learning in New Media Environments | Academic Commons - 0 views

  • ess important for students to know, memorize, or recall information
  • more important
  • to find, sort, analyze, share, discuss, critique, and create information
  • ...20 more annotations...
  • move from being simply knowledgeable to being knowledge-able
  • “information revolution”
  • new ways of relating
  • discourse,
  • social revolution, not a technological one
  • new forms of
  • Wikis, blogs, tagging, social networking
  • nspired by a spirit of interactivity, participation, and collaboration.
  • important
  • “spirit” of Web 2.0
  • new ways of interacting, new kinds of groups, and new ways of sharing, trading, and collaborating.
  • technology is secondary.
  • empowers us to rethink education and the teacher-student relationship
  • dea of learning as acquiring information is no longer a message we can afford to send to our students, and that we need to start redesigning our learning environments to address, leverage, and harness the new media environment now permeating our classrooms.
  • first address why, facilitate how, and let the what generate naturally from there.
  • mportance of the form of learning over the learning of learning
  • teaching subjects but subjectivities: ways of approaching, understanding, and interacting with the world.
  • We can't “teach” them. We can only create environments in which the practices and perspectives are nourished, encouraged, or inspired (and therefore continually practiced).
    • Amanda Marrinan
       
      Einstein - I don't each my pupils. I just create the environment in which they can learn
  • love and respect your students and they will love and respect you back. With the underlying feeling of trust and respect this provides, students quickly realize the importance of their role as co-creators of the learning environment and they begin to take responsibility for their own education.
  • The new media environment provides new opportunities for us to create a community of learners with our students seeking important and meaningful questions. Questions of the very best kind abound, and we become students again, pursuing questions we might have never imagined, joyfully learning right along with the others. In the best case scenario the students will leave the course, not with answers, but with more questions, and even more importantly, the capacity to ask still more questions generated from their continual pursuit and practice of the learningivities we hope to inspire. This is what I have called elsewhere, “anti-teaching,” in which the focus is not on providing answers to be memorized, but on creating a learning environment more conducive to producing the types of questions that ask students to challenge their taken-for-granted assumptions and see their own underlying biases. The beauty of the current moment is that new media has thrown all of us as educators into just this kind of question-asking, bias-busting, assumption-exposing environment. There are no easy answers, but we can at least be thankful for the questions that drive us on.
David McGavock

BetterLesson Home - 25 views

  •  
    Site where teachers share lessons. Lessons can be located using search on subject, level, subject type, instructional type, filetype. You can even sort results by the ratings of other teachers.
jason mammano

Need some research data on Remedial software vs web 2.0 in the classroom - 11 views

I am trying to make the argument that remedial software use in the classroom is not as effect as using those some computers for students to create content using a variety of content 2.0 tools. Any ar...

web web2.0 learning

started by jason mammano on 16 Aug 10 no follow-up yet
shanoo chaffin

Educational links and resources - 1 views

I appreciate the many resources and techniques that are presented by the users to help teachers in their profession to get a new way to educate students. Subject Subject range from reading to math.

education web2.0 technology tools learning teaching collaboration video

started by shanoo chaffin on 16 Feb 16 no follow-up yet
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