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David Peter

MIT Press Journals - International Journal of Learning and Media - Full Text - 0 views

  • Now, with study becoming a lifelong enterprise, and with the advent of a galaxy of new media, “learning” seems once again poised to become all things to all people, be they lay or scholarly.
    • David Peter
       
      So, since we are all lifelong learners with access to transparent, pervasive and ubiquitous technology ... not sure NEW media is all that NEW.
  • learning that do not occur automatically, readily, naturally, or by dint of simply living in a certain place at a certain time
    • David Peter
       
      Almost seems to be speaking of PROGRAMMED speaking, and not the new speaking environment/commons. Isn't all speaking contextual?
  • we may well have reached a set of tipping points: Going forward, learning may be far more individualized, far more in the hands (and the minds) of the learner, and far more interactive than ever before
    • David Peter
       
      Barr and Tagg mentioned this SHIFT earlier.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • advent of a galaxy of new media
    • David Peter
       
      What NEW media are they speaking of? The NEW media is always changing and may be difficult to specifically link to lifelong learners. Prensky speaks of digital natives and digital immigrants. Does all media work for all readers/users?
  • we may well have reached a set of tipping points
    • David Peter
       
      We are BEYOND the tipping point. More likely to be a GROUNDSWELL and it's up to us to ride the wave or not.
  • learning may be at once more individual
    • David Peter
       
      Thanks to technology, or inspite of technology?
  • Both the demands of the workplace and the demands of education have changed profoundly and promise to do so for the foreseeable future.
    • David Peter
       
      And, in addition, the focus has shifted to global learning, and not localized learning. The advent of 21st century skills, the reemergence of liberal education ... all are continuing to change and demand change.
  • technology is often cited as a primary driver of cultural change
    • David Peter
       
      Interesting thought. Is this an anthropological conclusion? A social conclusion? Who has cited this?
  • One could argue that a strictly formal learning experience is characterized by classroom-based instruction featuring an explicit curriculum and traditional pedagogical goals, and scaffolding implemented by a single educator; a pure informal learning experience lacks all of these characteristics
    • David Peter
       
      This would imply that informal learnnig, without structure, is somehow inferior. Isn't the tone of learning set by the classroom, the teacher and other variables?
  • A successful informal learning practice depends upon an independent, constructivistically oriented learner who can identify, locate, process, and synthesize the information he or she is lacking
    • David Peter
       
      Hard to imagine that this can ONLY occur with a constructivist paradigm?
justquestionans

Ashford-University ECE 332 Homework and Assignment Help - 1 views

Get help for Ashford-University ECE 332 Homework and Assignment Help. We provide assignment, homework, discussions and case studies help for all subjects Ashford-University for Session 2017-2018. ...

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started by justquestionans on 27 Jun 18 no follow-up yet
americanwhiz

Connect with this English Speaking World !! - 0 views

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    Speaking American Accent is different from other type of spoken English.This course has been developed to help you learn the basics of english Speaking skills and develop your accent. You'll will be helped to develop some proficiency in key areas of language skills through which your communication gets better and your accent gets influenced. You'll also explore how to organise the words and communicate in a faster way. By the end of the course you will be able to speak fluently and your communication gets stronger to the extent to communicate in world class.
Suzie Nestico

You're Allowed « Ideas and Thoughts - 0 views

  • Many schools and organizations would like to keep you from speaking up. When you speak up to question, initiate or wonder, you cause work and trouble because someone may have to respond, grant/deny permission or defend. The meetings where no one talks are short and efficient. Agenda items get passed, people get out early. Seems like a win-win.
  • Even if you work for some antiquated organization that says you can't participate in is global conversations, you can. Maybe under a pseudonym but your voice matters
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    Dean Shareski blog post about teachers blogging and speaking out. Dean speaks to the importance of teachers blogging.
teacherstarks

Schools, learning, innovation and student futures - 20 views

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    For all of us, learning was an innate part of life. It was something we just did, that was as natural to us as breathing. If not for this innate desire to learn and with it the ability to do so, we would never learn to walk, or speak or interact with others. But what happens to this innate drive to learn and how might we get it back?
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    For all of us, learning was an innate part of life. It was something we just did, that was as natural to us as breathing. If not for this innate desire to learn and with it the ability to do so, we would never learn to walk, or speak or interact with others.
David Wetzel

Top 10 Online Tools for Teaching Science and Math - 0 views

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    Why use Web 2.0 tools in science and math classes? The primary reason is they facilitate access to input and interaction with content through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. These tools offer enormous advantages for science and math teachers, in terms of helping their students learn using Web 2.0 tools. For example: * Most of these tools can be edited from any computer connected to the Internet. Teachers can add, edit and delete information even during class time. * Students learn how to use these tools for academic purposes and, at the same time, can transfer their use to their personal lives and future professional careers. * RSS feeds allow students to access all the desired research information on one page. * Students learn to be autonomous in their speaking process.
Philippe Scheimann

A Vision of Students Today (& What Teachers Must Do) | Britannica Blog - 0 views

  • It has taken years of acclimatizing our youth to stale artificial environments, piles of propaganda convincing them that what goes on inside these environments is of immense importance, and a steady hand of discipline should they ever start to question it.
    • Russell D. Jones
       
      There is a huge investment in resources, time, and tradition from the teacher, the instutions, the society, and--importantly--the students. Students have invested much more time (proportional to their short lives) in learning how to be skillful at the education game. Many don't like teachers changing the rules of the game just when they've become proficient at it.
  • Last spring I asked my students how many of them did not like school. Over half of them rose their hands. When I asked how many of them did not like learning, no hands were raised. I have tried this with faculty and get similar results. Last year’s U.S. Professor of the Year, Chris Sorensen, began his acceptance speech by announcing, “I hate school.” The crowd, made up largely of other outstanding faculty, overwhelmingly agreed. And yet he went on to speak with passionate conviction about his love of learning and the desire to spread that love. And there’s the rub. We love learning. We hate school. What’s worse is that many of us hate school because we love learning.
    • Russell D. Jones
       
      So we (teachers and students) are willing to endure a little (or a lot) of uncomfortableness in order to pursue that love of learning.
  • They tell us, first of all, that despite appearances, our classrooms have been fundamentally changed.
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • While most of our classrooms were built under the assumption that information is scarce and hard to find, nearly the entire body of human knowledge now flows through and around these rooms in one form or another, ready to be accessed by laptops, cellphones, and iPods. Classrooms built to re-enforce the top-down authoritative knowledge of the teacher are now enveloped by a cloud of ubiquitous digital information where knowledge is made, not found, and authority is continuously negotiated through discussion and participation. In short, they tell us that our walls no longer mark the boundaries of our classrooms.
  • And that’s what has been wrong all along. Some time ago we started taking our walls too seriously – not just the walls of our classrooms, but also the metaphorical walls that we have constructed around our “subjects,” “disciplines,” and “courses.” McLuhan’s statement about the bewildered child confronting “the education establishment where information is scarce but ordered and structured by fragmented, classified patterns, subjects, and schedules” still holds true in most classrooms today. The walls have become so prominent that they are even reflected in our language, so that today there is something called “the real world” which is foreign and set apart from our schools. When somebody asks a question that seems irrelevant to this real world, we say that it is “merely academic.”
  • We can use them in ways that empower and engage students in real world problems and activities, leveraging the enormous potentials of the digital media environment that now surrounds us. In the process, we allow students to develop much-needed skills in navigating and harnessing this new media environment, including the wisdom to know when to turn it off. When students are engaged in projects that are meaningful and important to them, and that make them feel meaningful and important, they will enthusiastically turn off their cellphones and laptops to grapple with the most difficult texts and take on the most rigorous tasks.
  • At the root of your question is a much more interesting observation that many of the styles of self-directed learning now enabled through technology are in conflict with the traditional teacher-student relationship. I don’t think the answer is to annihilate that relationship, but to rethink it.
  • Personally, I increasingly position myself as the manager of a learning environment in which I also take part in the learning. This can only happen by addressing real and relevant problems and questions for which I do not know the answers. That’s the fun of it. We become collaborators, with me exploring the world right along with my students.
  • our walls, the particular architectonics of the disciplines we work within, provide students with the conversational, narrative, cognitive, epistemological, methodological, ontological, the –ogical means for converting mere information into knowledge.
  •  
    useful article , I need to finish it and look at this 'famous clip' that had 1 million viewers
Jorge Gonçalves

Mobile Assisted Language Learning - 27 views

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    Smartphones and tablets give students access to all types of multimedia. Mobile access to Internet services offers a virtually constant, uninterrupted connection to learning resources. Access to sound files, mobile apps, podcasts, and video files from around the globe make mobile technology ideal for any student who would like to learn to speak a foreign language through multimedia.

    Without a course or program, it could be difficult for an independent learner to organize a curriculum; but what if vocabulary lessons were at your fingertips?
Fatima Anwar

Language Software Spanish - A List of Best Way to Learn Spanish - 0 views

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    Best ways to learn Spanish by language software Spanish, learn Spanish watching TV and you need to find the way to free learn Spanish speak that suits
Nigel Coutts

Learning And Teaching for Understanding - A day of Learning with PZ Sydney Network - The Learner's Way - 2 views

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    Today I had the pleasure of joining over three-hundred educators for a day of learning and sharing. That this was a Sunday and that the event was organised as a free event for educators by educators speaks volumes of the quality and care that educators bring to their role. 
lawagner

Writing Center Staff | Wilk - 0 views

  • delightful
  • gut-wrenching descent
    • lawagner
       
      Thesis: understanding the differences and cultural factors will help with some guidelines for communicating with ESL students/tutees, thus leading to more beneficial tutoring sessions.
  • ...56 more annotations...
    • lawagner
       
      Introduction
  • severe
  • ittle headway
  • communications gap.
  • made in the paper.
  • struggled
  • in my explanations
    • lawagner
       
      Since the first paragraph identified the problem and stated the solution, the reader needs to understand what is causing the probelm
  • cultural factors plague important aspects of ESL communications in the writing center.
  • ack of a shared linguistic knowledge base,
  • ifferences in the educational, rhetorical, and cultural contexts of their language
  • acquisition
  • learning
  • subconsciously incorporating of linguistic forms through reading and listening.
  • consciously assimilating rules and forms through study and instruction.
    • lawagner
       
      What causes the communication gap/ differences between what the ESL learner wrote and what the tutor is trying communicate as errors
  • Understanding those differences helps in formulating beneficial principles of communication
  • rhetorical models are quite diverse
  • In some cultures, one would be considered rude or abrupt to announce one's point immediately.
    • lawagner
       
      Socratic dialogue vs didactic context (lecture and passive learning)
  • Socratic dialogue
    • lawagner
       
      The tutor takes on the role of collaborator and is an authoritative figure based on didactic tutoring. Tutors don't need to know all the answers, but it seems this paragraph is saying start by using didactic tutoring and move towards Socratic dialogue.
  • didactic context
    • lawagner
       
      So we have a communications gap, how do we begin to communicate with the ESL learner. What tutoring style should we use? Didactic context and communicate collaboratively, but realize that tutor is more of an authoritative figure, telling/informing the tutee of what he/she must do.
  • shared assumptions and patterns of language
  • apply a principle they have learned to a grammar error.
  • communicate collaboratively
  • ole as cultural/rhetorical informants as well as collaborators.
  • Cultural differences in body language
  • attitudes and preferences
  • The acceptability of degrees of physical proximity and eye contact differ between cultures.
    • lawagner
       
      Cultural differences in body language (speaking without speaking), attitudes and preferences need to be known so that the tutor and tutee may communicate effectively. Examples of these cultural differences are given: Latin American, Arabic, Asian, and Chinese.
    • lawagner
       
      When I have gone to a new country, such as Zambia and Mexico, I looked up the ways in which to communicate with folks there, forbidden hand gesture, is shaking hands okay. In some culture they kiss each other on the cheek as a greeting. Ignorance towards body language, attitudes, and preferences may drive an eternal wedge between the tutor and tutee. This is a huge part of understanding cultural differences.
  • it down first and allow the student to establish comfortable body positioning
  • ake body language cues from the writer
  • encouraging the student to speak up or ask questions
    • lawagner
       
      This paragraph answers a question Writing Centers, directors and tutors may wonder: Do I have to know everything about every culture in order to communicate effectively? When writing essays it's important to keep in mind questions that may arise from the intended audience.
    • lawagner
       
      The tutor does not need to know everything about every culture, rather keenly observe the tutee, and modify behavior when appropriate.
  • utor can foster discourse through slightly modified behavior.
  • temptation to address too many issues in one session
    • lawagner
       
      Another issue with tutoring ESL learners: trying to fix everything at once. They are not the same as a native English speaker and cannot be expected to eat, chew and digest everything put in front of them. You need to pick up the steak knife and cut up the steak into manageable pieces. 
    • lawagner
       
      Native English speaker vs ESL learner; don't tutor them the same Although this paragraph seems slightly out of place and doesn't move the argument forward, it is a reminder that ESL students are tackling the foreign language and cannot be expected to handle the same workload as native speakers.
  • effective communications is best achieved by limiting the topics covered within the session
  • English is not the primary language.
    • lawagner
       
      Going back to ESL learners, a part of understanding cultural differences is understanding that they are coming to me for help with their writing-writing which is in a foreign language to them. Understanding prioritizing is part of the solution when tutoring ESL learner, and all learners consequently.
  • The driving force behind limiting is prioritizing.
  • the primary cultural barrier to communication
    • lawagner
       
      Explaining the differences in mechanics seen in varying languages spoken by other cultures. Patience is key nevertheless.
    • lawagner
       
      So how do tutors not overwhelm the tutees? By prioritizing-what is causing the most issues and go from there.
    • lawagner
       
      Communication barriers lie in the language itself and its attached conversational dialect, transcending into how the ESL learner communicates in their native tongue. * I think this paragraph could be two.
  • ack of fluency in conversational dialect
  • Close observation is a key to interpreting and dispelling cultural interference.
    • lawagner
       
      Summarizing the last several paragraphs; close observation is the key as well as other possible modifications.
    • lawagner
       
      Summarizing the main points is like the Therefore since we know all of this we can understand  the cultural differences between the tutor and ESL tutee and thus eliminate or at least reduce the cultural barriers.
    • lawagner
       
      Conclusion
    • lawagner
       
      A continuance of the last paragraph. All of this information presented  may help or it may not.
Judy Robison

Simply Speaking - Teaching and Speaking with Technology - 78 views

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    "Simply Speaking is a series of brief videos created by Teaching and Speaking with Technology that explain technology topics in everyday language and with a little humor. They are modeled after the "... in plain english" videos that explain more general technologies"
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    It really makes life a lot easier !!
Fabian Aguilar

American Cultures 2.0 - 0 views

  • If we want students to become citizens who understand their role as a citizen then we need to teach them to understand and respect the power of questions.
  • Without the freedom and courage to ask that paradigm shifting question then progress and innovation would cease to exist and we would become slaves to our past and out-dated solutions.
  • The power of just one word can totally change the meaning of something as intrinsic as national identity.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • The more students have an opportunity to read, speak and write the more they are going to understand the power of words.
  • The moment students craft words meant not just for the teacher and a few other peers, but for the wider world, is the moment students learn that a misplaced, mispronounced, or misspelled word has consequences far beyond a grade. These authentic learning opportunities are crucial to prepare students for the new realities of a more global and transparent world.
  • Students (and teachers) need to understand that everything they do communicates, whether they know what they are communicating or not.
  • Once students really figure out who they are and what they stand for then they can more comfortably be themselves. However, an important social skill that many students have difficulty grasping is knowing appropriate social norms in various settings.
  • Anyone can be a teacher... if you are alert and willing to learn from others. We need to teach students to be alert and willing to learn from sources other than textbooks. We need to teach students how to create and cultivate learning from a personal learning network, in order to extend the traditional capabilities of school from the limited hours of the school day to the unlimited hours beyond the school day. The informal classroom of life offers lessons far more valuable than the classroom if only we are open to learning from each other each and every day.
Tero Toivanen

"Reboelje!" - Invisible Learning in the Netherlands | Education Futures - 12 views

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    The purpose of the Invisible Learning Tour is to raise awareness for the need for innovation in education.
Bill Graziadei, Ph.D. (aka Dr. G)

YouTube - No More "Learners" - 1 views

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    The instructor/learner relationship needs re-thinking. We've got to be learning from one another, not shoveling learning at "learners." We are all learners, all the time, and we can get b...
jodi tompkins

Glossopedia Home - 0 views

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    This site is designed especially with the young learner in mind with its age-appropriate content and emphasis on visual and auditory learning. Glossopedia is the kind of site that you can leave open for students to explore and find a fast fact of the day, find their favorite image, or video Glossopedia Categories Geography and Places Nature and the Environment Technology Animals Earth and Space People and Cultures Human Body Chemistry Natural Forces This site is simple and visually pleasing. The font size is great for young learners. Words are hyperlinked to an audio pronunciation that is a real person, learning really slowly at first then more quickly, and finally the written meaning of the word. Images and photos have a print button prominently displayed.
Jose Paulo Santos

Creativity in Education: An Evening with Sir Ken Robinson - Planet Blog - PrometheanPlanet - 54 views

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    Recently, I had the honour and privilege of attending "An Evening with Sir Ken Robinson", which was organised by Learning without Frontiers and supported by Promethean. A mid-week event on a school night would usually be a tall order for many teachers to attend, yet the large auditorium was full to capacity and, as Sir Ken started Learning, I immediately knew that this would be an evening of inspiration and forward thinking, which indeed it was!
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    Please, read and comment. Are you 'teaching creatively' or 'teaching for creativity'?
Berylaube 00

Main Page - TEFL World Wiki - 0 views

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    Acollaborative project with the aim of providing useful information for TEFL professionals." TEFL Teaching: This area is all about teaching: how to teach and what to teach. And then how to make sure your students are learning! Included here are loads of activities and ideas for classroom control, discipline, techniques and so on Skills:How to teach the four skills in English: listening, reading, learning and writing. Grammar Guide:=The TWW Grammar Guide is a comprehensive guide to English grammar written in a user-friendly manner for both learners and teachers.
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