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Tero Toivanen

Education Futures - The role of teachers in Education 3.0 - 0 views

  • Download-style education fails when we try to provide students with knowledge and skills that will enable them to lead in a future that is very different from what exists today –and, in a future that defies human imagination.
  • Teaching in Education 3.0 requires a new form of co-constructivism that provides meaningful extensions to Dewey, Vygotsky and Freire, while building the future.
  • Specifically, teaching in Education 3.0 necessitates a Leapfrog approach with: Adults who are eager to imagine, create and innovate with kids kids and adults who want to learn more about each other kids and adults who partner to collaborate in teaching to and learning from each other kids who work at creative tasks that mirror the innovation workforce An understanding that kids need to contribute to all economic levels, and with better distribution of effort than in the past
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  • The future that kids and adults co-create can provide the emerging knowledge/innovation economy a boost, greatly enhancing human capital and potentials. How would you teach, learn, and create in Education 3.0? ShareThis
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    The future that kids and adults co-create can provide the emerging knowledge/innovation economy a boost, greatly enhancing human capital and potentials. How would you teach, learn, and create in Education 3.0?
Fatima Anwar

The Integrated Learning Platform: Cardiff Univeristy - Cardiff is everything a good university should be - 0 views

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    Cardiff University is recognized in independent government tests as one of The British leading educating and analysis colleges. Established by Royal Charter in 1883, the University today brings together impressive modern facilities and a powerful approach to educating and analysis with its proud culture of service and accomplishment. Cardiff University is the biggest University of mature education and learning in Wales, with the Cardiff Center for Long term Studying offering several hundred programs in locations across Southern Eastern Wales. The University's lifelong learning actions also include the professional growth work performed by educational institutions for companies, and many of these is custom-made to match an individual business's needs. The Center also provides business terminology training at all levels. Founded: 1883. Structural features: Merged with University of Wales College of Medicine (UCWM) in 2004. Location: Close to Cardiff city center. Healthcare care learners also at hospital website, Heath Recreation area University, 1 mile away. Getting there: Cardiff Primary Place on the national train network; trainers to bus station (next to train station); M4 from London and M5 (west county and Midlands). For school, frequent teaches from Primary Place to Cathays station (on campus), regional vehicles from bus station (53, 79, 81 for main campus; 8 or 9 for hospital site). Academic features: 4-year incorporated food techniques, 5-year two-tier techniques in structure and town planning. 5-year medical and dental programs, plus foundation season for those without science backgrounds; medical teaching throughout Wales. Awarding body: Cardiff University; Wales University for some healthcare programs. Main undergrad awards: BA, BD, BDS, BMus, BN, BSc, BEng, BScEcon, LLB, BArch, MB BCh, MPhys, MChem, MEng, MPharm. Length of courses: 3 years; others 4 and 5 decades. Library & IT facilities: Integrated collection,
Roland Gesthuizen

24 Educational iPad Apps for Educational in Reading & Writing « Imagination Soup | Fun Learning and Play Activities for Educational - 0 views

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    "As I started a go-to list of the best educational iPad apps for educational, the list got so long, I split up my posts into categories. So, today we'll start with my favorite iPad apps for literacy - reading and writing for toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary-age educational. Also, I've included special needs iPad app resources at the end of this post."
sulmahmud1

Which Educational Games for the Educational Should Be Given child | Department Of Education - 0 views

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    There remain a huge number of educational games for the educational. Among them, you have to find out the effectives for your child's mental & physical development.
Sheri Edwards

Educational Leadership:Best of Educational Leadership 2009-2010:Start Where Your Students Are - 18 views

  • Instead of forging superficial connections, starting where your students are is about showing kids how to learn in ways that work best for them. It's about creating spaces in the classroom where our students can feel comfortable being who they are rather than conforming to who we think they should be. It's about helping kids feel safe enough to bring with them their skills, strengths, culture, and background knowledge—and showing them how to use these to acquire the curriculum.
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    Instead of forging superficial connections, starting where your students are is about showing kids how to learn in ways that work best for them. It's about creating spaces in the classroom where our students can feel comfortable being who they are rather than conforming to who we think they should be. It's about helping kids feel safe enough to bring with them their skills, strengths, culture, and background knowledge-and showing them how to use these to acquire the curriculum.
Melissa Seifman

Education Outrage: Why do we still have schools? - 1 views

  • Competition: Why should school be a competitive event?
  • We learn what we choose to know in real life.
  • Stress: When 6 year olds are stressed about going to school you know that something is wrong.
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  • Right answers: School teaches that there are right answers.
  • But, in real life, there are very few right answers.
  • Bullying and peer pressure
  • In school there are always other kids telling you how to dress, how to act, how to be cool.
  • Stifling of curiosity: Isn’t it obvious that learning is really about curiosity?
  • Adults earn about things they want to learn about. Before the age of 6, prior to school, one kid becomes a dinosaur specialist while another knows all about dog breeds. Outside of school people drive their own learning. Schools eliminate this natural behavior.
    • Tero Toivanen
       
      Exactly!
  • Subjects chosen for you:
  • Classrooms:
  • Classrooms make no sense as a venue for learning unless of course you want to save money and have 30 (or worse hundreds of) students be handled by one teacher.
  • Schools cannot work as places of learning if they employ classrooms.
  • Grades: Any professor can tell you that students are pretty much concerned with whether what you are telling them will be on the test and what they might do for extra credit.
    • Melissa Seifman
       
      I disagree - Employers do have rating systems, performance evaluations, but most of those are on the whole person, not just technical or academic skills
  • Parents do not give grades to children and employers do not give grades to employees. They judge their work and progress for sure, but not by assigning numbers to a report card.
  • Certification: We all know why people attend college. They do primarily to say they are college graduates so they can get a job or go on to a professional school.
    • Caroline Roche
       
      So, why is this the student's fault? Why blame, or disadvatage them for this? We should be fighting the system that causes students to work like this, not blaming them for doing it! it is the constant testing and league table system that is wrong.
  • Confined children: Children like to run around.
  • Of course in school, sitting still is the norm. So we have come up with this wonderful idea of ADD, i.e. drug those who won’t sit still into submission. Is the system sick or what?
  • Academics viewed as winners: Who are the smartest kids in school?
  • Those who are good at these subjects go on to be professors. So those are certainly the smartest people we have in our society.
  • But, I can tell you from personal experience that our society doesn’t respect professors all that much, so something is wrong here.
  • Practical skills not valued: When I was young there were academic high schools and trade high schools. Trade high schools were for dumb kids. Academic high schools were for smart kids.
  • The need to please teachers: People who succeed at school are invariably people who are good out at figuring what the teacher wants and giving it to them.
  • In real life there is no teacher to please and these “grade grubbers” often find themselves lost.
  • Self worth questioned: School is full of winners and losers.
  • In school, most everyone sees themselves as a loser. Why do we allow this to happen?
  • Politicians in charge: Politicians demand reform but they wouldn’t know reform if it hit them over the head.
  • Major learning by doing mechanism ignored: And last but not least, scholars from Plato to Dewey have pointed that people learn by doing. That is how we learn. Doing. Got it? Apparently not. Very little doing in schools. Unless you count filling in circles with number 2 pencils as doing.
  • Government use of education for repression: As long as there have been governments there have been governments who wanted people to think that the governments (and the country) is very good.
  • School is about teaching “truth.”
  • Discovery not valued: The most important things we learn we teach ourselves.
    • Tero Toivanen
       
      Autotelic learning!
  • This kind of learning is not valued in school because it might lead to, heaven forbid, failure, and failure is a really bad word in school. Except failure is how we learn, which is pretty much why school doesn’t work.
    • Tero Toivanen
       
      Exactly!
  • Boredom ignored: Boredom is a bad thing. We drug bored kids with Ritalin so they will stop being bored.
  • What they mean is that school should be like they remember rather than how it is now
    • Caroline Roche
       
      Not accepting students with straight A's only shows your own prejudices. Students can be good at a range of subjects, without being passionately interested in all of them. Lots of people are self motivated, without being teacher pleasers, they just wish to do their best in everything for their own satisfaction.
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    Why do we have schools? Instead of answering this question by listing all the good things that schools provide, which anyone can do, I will turn the question around: What is bad about having schools?
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    Why do we have schools? Instead of answering this question by listing all the good things that schools provide, which anyone can do, I will turn the question around: What is bad about having schools?
Kerry J

Handipoints - Print Chore Charts Free | Kids Allowances | Kids Virtual World - 0 views

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    Parents and kids agree upon tasks that are to be accomplished, when child completes task, parent releases bonus points that kids can use to buy accessories for their characters.
Jonathan Wylie

The Best Free Science Games for Kids Online: Kids Fun for Everyone - 0 views

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    Are your kids inquiring young scientists who are always curious about the world around them? If so, the following websites are just what you need. They contain some of the best science games for kids online. Each of them are fun to explore and play with, but they also have a sound kids base.
chifrostudios

Nursery Rhymes for Kids for Android - 0 views

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    Best Educational for Pre-School Educational which provides creative way of learning to Educational , where they can enjoy musical rhymes and can dance on the beats
Tero Toivanen

Digital Citizenship | the human network - 0 views

  • The change is already well underway, but this change is not being led by teachers, administrators, parents or politicians. Coming from the ground up, the true agents of change are the students within the educational system.
  • While some may be content to sit on the sidelines and wait until this cultural reorganization plays itself out, as educators you have no such luxury. Everything hits you first, and with full force. You are embedded within this change, as much so as this generation of students.
  • We make much of the difference between “digital immigrants”, such as ourselves, and “digital natives”, such as these children. These kids are entirely comfortable within the digital world, having never known anything else. We casually assume that this difference is merely a quantitative facility. In fact, the difference is almost entirely qualitative. The schema upon which their world-views are based, the literal ‘rules of their world’, are completely different.
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  • The Earth becomes a chalkboard, a spreadsheet, a presentation medium, where the thorny problems of global civilization and its discontents can be explored out in exquisite detail. In this sense, no problem, no matter how vast, no matter how global, will be seen as being beyond the reach of these children. They’ll learn this – not because of what teacher says, or what homework assignments they complete – through interaction with the technology itself.
  • We and our technological-materialist culture have fostered an environment of such tremendous novelty and variety that we have changed the equations of childhood.
  • As it turns out (and there are numerous examples to support this) a mobile handset is probably the most important tool someone can employ to improve their economic well-being. A farmer can call ahead to markets to find out which is paying the best price for his crop; the same goes for fishermen. Tradesmen can close deals without the hassle and lost time involved in travel; craftswomen can coordinate their creative resources with a few text messages. Each of these examples can be found in any Bangladeshi city or Africa village.
  • The sharing of information is an innate human behavior: since we learned to speak we’ve been talking to each other, warning each other of dangers, informing each other of opportunities, positing possibilities, and just generally reassuring each other with the sound of our voices. We’ve now extended that four-billion-fold, so that half of humanity is directly connected, one to another.
  • Everything we do, both within and outside the classroom, must be seen through this prism of sharing. Teenagers log onto video chat services such as Skype, and do their homework together, at a distance, sharing and comparing their results. Parents offer up their kindergartener’s presentations to other parents through Twitter – and those parents respond to the offer. All of this both amplifies and undermines the classroom. The classroom has not dealt with the phenomenal transformation in the connectivity of the broader culture, and is in danger of becoming obsolesced by it.
  • We already live in a time of disconnect, where the classroom has stopped reflecting the world outside its walls. The classroom is born of an industrial mode of thinking, where hierarchy and reproducibility were the order of the day. The world outside those walls is networked and highly heterogeneous. And where the classroom touches the world outside, sparks fly; the classroom can’t handle the currents generated by the culture of connectivity and sharing. This can not go on.
  • We must accept the reality of the 21st century, that, more than anything else, this is the networked era, and that this network has gifted us with new capabilities even as it presents us with new dangers. Both gifts and dangers are issues of potency; the network has made us incredibly powerful. The network is smarter, faster and more agile than the hierarchy; when the two collide – as they’re bound to, with increasing frequency – the network always wins.
  • A text message can unleash revolution, or land a teenager in jail on charges of peddling child pornography, or spark a riot on a Sydney beach; Wikipedia can drive Britannica, a quarter millennium-old reference text out of business; a outsider candidate can get himself elected president of the United States because his team masters the logic of the network. In truth, we already live in the age of digital citizenship, but so many of us don’t know the rules, and hence, are poor citizens.
  • before a child is given a computer – either at home or in school – it must be accompanied by instruction in the power of the network. A child may have a natural facility with the network without having any sense of the power of the network as an amplifier of capability. It’s that disconnect which digital citizenship must bridge.
  • Let us instead focus on how we will use technology in fifty years’ time. We can already see the shape of the future in one outstanding example – a website known as RateMyProfessors.com. Here, in a database of nine million reviews of one million teachers, lecturers and professors, students can learn which instructors bore, which grade easily, which excite the mind, and so forth. This simple site – which grew out of the power of sharing – has radically changed the balance of power on university campuses throughout the US and the UK.
  • Alongside the rise of RateMyProfessors.com, there has been an exponential increase in the amount of lecture material you can find online, whether on YouTube, or iTunes University, or any number of dedicated websites. Those lectures also have ratings, so it is already possible for a student to get to the best and most popular lectures on any subject, be it calculus or Mandarin or the medieval history of Europe.
  • As the university dissolves in the universal solvent of the network, the capacity to use the network for education increases geometrically; education will be available everywhere the network reaches. It already reaches half of humanity; in a few years it will cover three-quarters of the population of the planet. Certainly by 2060 network access will be thought of as a human right, much like food and clean water.
  • Educators will continue to collaborate, but without much of the physical infrastructure we currently associate with educational institutions. Classrooms will self-organize and disperse organically, driven by need, proximity, or interest, and the best instructors will find themselves constantly in demand. Life-long learning will no longer be a catch-phrase, but a reality for the billions of individuals all focusing on improving their effectiveness within an ever-more-competitive global market for talent.
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    Mark Pesce: Digital Citizenship and the future of Education.
Kathleen Porter

Educational Leadership:Technology-Rich Learning:Students First, Not Stuff - 0 views

  • What Do We Mean by Learning?
  • allowing students to pursue their interests in the context of the curriculum
  • Teachers must be colearners with kids, expert at asking great, open-ended questions and modeling the learning process required to answer those questions. Teachers should be master learners in the classroom
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  • What Does It Mean to Be Literate?
  • What Does It Mean to Be Educated?
  • What Do Students Need to Know?
  • developing the skills and dispositions necessary for them to learn whatever they need to learn whenever they need to learn it? That means rethinking classrooms to focus on individual passions, inquiry, creation, sharing, patient problem solving, and innovation
  • start with the questions that focus on our students
  • Instead of helping our students become "college ready," we might be better off making them "learning ready," prepared for any opportunity that might present itself down the road
  • With access, and with a full set of skills and literacies to use this access well, we now have the power to create our own education in any number of ways
  • manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information
  • Some, like Stanford professor Howard Rheingold, believe that technology now requires an attention literacy—the ability to exert some degree of mental control over our use of technology rather than simply being distracted by it—for users to be productive. Professor Henry Jenkins at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) advocates for transmedia literacy, which includes networking and performance skills that take advantage of this connected, audience-rich moment.
  • it's about addressing the new needs of modern learners in entirely new ways. And once we understand that it's about learning, our questions reframe themselves in terms of the ecological shifts we need to make: What do we mean by learning? What does it mean to be literate in a networked, connected world? What does it mean to be educated? What do students need to know and be able to do to be successful in their futures? Educators must lead inclusive conversations in their communities around such questions to better inform decisions about technology and change
  • Right now, we should be asking ourselves not just how to do school better, but how to do it decidedly differently
  • Learning is now truly participatory in real-world contexts. The transformation occurs in that participation, that connection with other learners outside school walls with whom we can converse, create, and publish authentic, meaningful, beautiful work
  • what do we do as schools become just one of many places in both the real and virtual world where our students can get an education? Welcome to what portends to be the messiest, most upheaval-filled 10 years in education that any of us has ever seen. Resistance, as they say, is futile
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    "Putting technology first-simply adding a layer of expensive tools on top of the traditional curriculum-does nothing to address the new needs of modern learners."
milesmorales

Homeschooling Tips That Will Really Help You Out - 0 views

Kids in public schools face many hurdles today, the bulk of which we never had to deal with when we were young. The best way to help your Kids avoid these pitfalls is to homeschool them, and the he...

started by milesmorales on 19 Aug 14 no follow-up yet
theummedschool

The Ummed School - Best School in Jodhpur - 0 views

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    Our holistic learning approach continues in different forms, so, today lemonade making activity organized in The Ummed School in which students learned how 2-3 substances are mixed and a totally new substance is formed. This type of practical learning approach helps a lot in developing creativity and forming a thought process. Lemonade is the drink of choice for countless people-and now you can use it to teach your little ones the scientific method! This fun science activity for kids allows children to make their own lemonade while following directions, making a hypothesis, and collecting data through observation. Activity Instructions Cut a lemon into four pieces and throw away all of the seeds. Put a piece of lemon in a Ziploc bag, one for each child and one for yourself. Help your children measure and add a half a cup of water and a teaspoon of sugar to their bags. When all of the ingredients are added, zip the bags. Help your child squeeze the lemon into the bag and shake it up to mix the contents. As you are shaking it ask your kids to predict what will happen to the ingredients. Have them talk about the changes they are seeing within the bag and how they think the lemonade will taste. After 30 seconds, stop mixing and add a couple of ice cubes to each bag. Hand your little ones a straw and enjoy! The outcome of Activity This fun science activity for kids will teach your little ones how to follow the scientific method. They will listen to your instructions, predict the outcome of the activity, and make observations throughout. Additionally, they will create a delicious drink that they can enjoy!
mbarek Akaddar

25 Safe, Fun & Educational Virtual Worlds for Toddlers, Educational, and Tweens | eLearning Gurus - 40 views

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    25 safe, fun & educational virtual worlds for toddlers, educational, and tweens
Allison Kipta

The Answer Sheet - Willingham: Why doesn't reading more make us better readers? - 25 views

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    "We have supposedly been in the midst of an educational back-to-basics movement since the 1983 release of "A Nation at Risk," a report by a national commission that said American society was in danger of deteriorating because of an eroding public education system. Why, then, have reading scores (as measured by the National Assessment of educational Progress, a test often called the nation's report card), been flat since 1971? One obvious answer is that even if we're getting back to basics in school, educational read less and less outside of school. Think of all of the new technologies that compete for their time: they have ipods, video games, text messaging, instant messaging, cell phones. Who has time to read? Surprise! Americans read more now than they did in 1980. A lot more, according to an exhaustive study done at the University of California, San Diego."
Scott Kinkoph

TeachThoughtYouth And Digital Learning: Are Kids Different Because Of Digital Media? - 0 views

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    Youth And Digital Learning: Are Kids Different Because Of Digital Media?
Kathleen N

Interactive Whiteboard Games | PBS KIDS - 0 views

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    Here is our collection of interactive whiteboard games for educators on PBS KIDS. Students will enjoy participating in these collaborative, fun and engaging experiences, while exploring curriculum from trusted programs such as Curious George, Super Why and Arthur. Like our programs, all of our games are age-appropriate and vetted by educators. One 3-5,6-8 activity on gravity
Maggie Verster

A great classroom link resource page - 28 views

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    eg EDUCATION RESOURCES, SEARCH ENGINES, COOL LINKS FOR KIDS,TECHNOLOGY LINKS, READING RESOURCES, ALL ABOUT WRITING, SCIENCE LINKS, MATH LINKS FOR EVERYONE, SOCIAL STUDIES LINKS GEOGRAPHY & PLACES IN THE WORLD, CELEBRATIONS BY THE MONTH,Links 4 SCHOOL LEADERS & SUPERVISORS, JUST FOR PARENTS
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    eg EDUCATION RESOURCES, SEARCH ENGINES, COOL LINKS FOR KIDS,TECHNOLOGY LINKS, READING RESOURCES, ALL ABOUT WRITING, SCIENCE LINKS, MATH LINKS FOR EVERYONE, SOCIAL STUDIES LINKS GEOGRAPHY & PLACES IN THE WORLD, CELEBRATIONS BY THE MONTH,Links 4 SCHOOL LEADERS & SUPERVISORS, JUST FOR PARENTS
Sharon Stephens

Kids Blogging - Group | Diigo - 0 views

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    Looking for educators to contribute links to safe blogs for "Kids Blogging" group.
kathy dounelis

Highly recommend Diigo Educator Account - Classroom 2.0 - 1 views

  • I tried out Diigo educator and was REALLY impressed. This let me very quickly (and with no email addresses needed) set up accounts for 30 students. I then created a group for all 3 classes to use and added all the students to the group. In this case, since I only have one more day with the kids and am not sure if they'll be using Diigo after this, I just used the 30 accounts for multiple classes, but if this were for my actual students, I would have created an account for each student. Anyway, once all the students were added to the group, I just instructed them to make sure to share every bookmark for this project with the group. All of the students will then be able to view all of the bookmarks. Again, we couldn't install even the diigolet, but saving right from Diigo worked fine for our purposes. They used the same technique of tagging with last name, class hour, and other appropriate tags. I taught both of these methods in a 45 minute class period and the actual explanation of the bookmarking technique took only 7-10 min. of each class period. The kids (7th graders) picked up on it EXTREMELY fast.
  • for long term use and for individual projects I strongly recommend using Diigo educator, especially since I use Diigo so heavily in my personal and professional web research.
  • I highly recommend Diigo Educator to any teacher!
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  • then created a group for all 3 classes to use and added all the students to the group. In this case, since I only have
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