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Karen Vitek

100 Best Education Blogs of 2009 - 35 views

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    "2009 was a great year for education on the web and each of these blogs was selected for helping lead the charge forward with shared personal experiences, leadership, and social media. Every single one of these blogs are worth reading in 2010, so we hope you'll check them out. The list is categorized into different education subtopics such as education technology, higher education, education reform, and more. To all the blog owners, keep up the good work and congratulations on a great year!"
Fatima Anwar

Integrated Learning Platform: California Institute of Technology online education resource of scientists and engineers - 0 views

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    California Institute of Technology the first education resource of higher education universities in California. Caltech is ranked 1st internationally in top 100 colleges began to offer higher online education classes through MOOCs under Coursera, and now in 2013 Caltech's Online Education programs available through edX.
Judy Robison

Online University Reviews : 100 Most Inspiring and Innovative Blogs for 100 - 2 views

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    "Whether you work at elementary schools or online colleges, you will find that being a teacher is a difficult and often thankless job. Between lesson plans, unengaged students, and new emerging technologies, teachers need help now more than ever. Luckily, there are a few resources out there for educators looking for tips, empathy, and inspiration. Blogs are a great way for teachers to connect with other great teachers around the world, find advice and inspiration, and learn new, cutting-edge teaching strategies. By visiting the educators blogs below, you will find answers to all of your questions, as well as valuable teaching resources."
Jim Farmer

100 Great Google Docs Tips for Students & 100 - 66 views

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    100 Great Google Docs Tips for Students & 100
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    For students and teachers, the Google Docs collection provides a streamlined, collaborative solution to writing papers, organizing presentations and putting together spreadsheets and reports. But besides the basic features, there are lots of little tricks and hacks you can use to make your Google Docs experience even more productive. Here are 100 great tips for using the documents, presentations and spreadsheets in Google Docs.
Leah Evans

Contractions - 0 views

  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put together and an apostrophe is added to replace the omitted letters.
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put together
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put together
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  • Word Lists Analogies - New!CapitonymsCompound Words - New!  Contractions Dolch - Sight WordsGeography ListsHomophones, Homonyms, etc.Literature Based Word ListsMath Vocabulary - Most Popular!Monthly Holiday ListsMultiple Meaning Words - New!Phonics & Sight Word CurriculumPossessive NounsSample Lists By GradeScience Vocabulary - New!Sequential Spelling ProgramSound Alike WordsSyllables - New!Word Abbreviations Help and InformationFAQs - Frequently Asked QuestionsPrintablesOur Educational AwardsTestmonials- New!Custom Sentences and Definitions Handwriting WorksheetsStudent Writing PracticeTeacher Training VideosGetting Started Welcome LettersFunding Sources - New! ArticlesResearch on Spelling AutomaticityThe Importance of SpellingRecommended Learning ResourcesImprove your writing skillsAdopt-A-ClassroomSpellingCity and NCom  put ingReading ComprehensionIncorporating Spelling Into ReadingWriting Prompts that Motivate   Contractions Contractions
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  • Word Lists Analogies - New! Capitonyms Compound Words - New!    Contractions Dolch - Sight Words Geography Lists Homophones, Homonyms, etc. Literature Based Word Lists Math Vocabulary - Most Popular! Monthly Holiday Lists Multiple Meaning Words - New! Phonics & Sight Word Curriculum Possessive Nouns Sample Lists By Grade Science Vocabulary - New! Sequential Spelling Program Sound Alike Words Syllables - New! Word Abbreviations Help and Information FAQs - Frequently Asked Questions Printables Our Educational Awards Testmonials - New! Custom Sentences and Definitions Handwriting Worksheets Student Writing Practice Teacher Training Videos Getting Started Welcome Letters Funding Sources - New! Articles Research on Spelling Automaticity The Importance of Spelling Recommended Learning Resources Improve your writing skills Adopt-A-Classroom SpellingCity and NCom   put ing Reading Comprehension Incorporating Spelling Into Reading Writing Prompts that Motivate   Contractions Contractions
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    Free games to reinforce the usage and spelling of contractions.
Bob Rowan

Top Tools 2011 C4LPT - 0 views

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    List of Top 100 Tools for Learning from Centre Fore Learning & Performance Technologies; decent summary of technology in education trends, shared by Sue Van Den Acre, via Magi Koch
J Black

FETC - 0 views

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    FREE 100 PERCENT ONLINE EVENT! APRIL 23, 2009 11:00am-7:00pm EST Registration Required PARTICIPATE WITH YOUR COLLEAGUES FROM THE CONVENIENCE OF YOUR OFFICE! The award-winning producers of FETC and T.H.E. Journal invite you to participate in a FREEvirtual conference for K-12 100 and technology staff exploring the most pressing issues related to 21st Century Skills. Join your peers and industry experts as they investigate a range of compelling topics including: * Career and technical education * The Obama administration's global workforce development agenda * Digital teaching methods and tools
Caroline Roche

100 Tips, Apps, and Resources for Teachers on Twitter | Online College Degree - 0 views

  • this list of 100 tips, apps, and resources is worth browsing. Find out how to get started with Twitter, ways to use it in an educational setting, and tools to help you use it better with these resources
Tero Toivanen

Music and the Brain - 0 views

  • A little known fact about Einstein is that when he was young he did extremely poor in school. His grade school teachers told his parents to take him out of school because he was "too stupid to learn" and it would be a waste of resources for the school to invest time and energy in his education. The school suggested that his parents get Albert an easy, manual labor job as soon as they could.
  • Instead of following the school's advice, Albert's parents bought him a violin. Albert became good at the violin. Music was the key that helped Albert Einstein become one of the smartest men who has ever lived. Einstein himself says that the reason he was so smart is because he played the violin. He loved the music of Mozart and Bach the most. A friend of Einstein, G.J. Withrow, said that the way Einstein figured out his problems and equations was by improvising on the violin.
  • Another example of how rhythm orders movement is an autistic boy who could not tie his shoes. He learned how on the second try when the task of tying his shoes was put to a song. The rhythm helped organize his physical movements in time.
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  • Classical music from the baroque period causes the heart beat and pulse rate to relax to the beat of the music. As the body becomes relaxed and alert, the mind is able to concentrate more easily. Furthermore, baroque music decreases blood pressure and enhances the ability to learn. Music affects the amplitude and frequency of brain waves, which can be measured by an electro-encephalogram. Music also affects breathing rate and electrical resistance of the skin. It has been observed to cause the pupils to dilate, increase blood pressure, and increase the heart rate.
  • Mozart's music and baroque music, with a 60 beats per minute beat pattern, activate the left and right brain. The simultaneous left and right brain action maximizes learning and retention of information. The information being studied activates the left brain while the music activates the right brain. Also, activities which engage both sides of the brain at the same time, such as playing an instrument or singing, causes the brain to be more capable of processing information.
  • According to The Center for New Discoveries in Learning, learning potential can be increased a minimum of five times by using this 60 beats per minute music.
  • Dr. Lozanov's system involved using certain classical music pieces from the baroque period which have around a 60 beats per minute pattern. He has proven that foreign languages can be learned with 85-100% efficiency in only thirty days by using these baroque pieces. His students had a recall accuracy rate of almost 100% even after not reviewing the material for four years.
  • Group 1 was read the words with Handel's Water Music in the background. They were also asked to imagine the words. Group 2 was read the same words also with Handel's Water Music in the background. Group 2 was not asked to imagine the words. Group 3 was only read the words, was not given any background music, and was also not asked to imagine the words. The results from the first two tests showed that groups 1 and 2 had much better scores than group 3. The results from the third test, a week later, showed that group 1 performed much better than groups 2 or 3.
  • One simple way students can improve test scores is by listening to certain types of music such as Mozart's Sonata for Two Piano's in D Major before taking a test. This type of music releases neurons in the brain which help the body to relax.
  • William Balach, Kelly Bowman, and Lauri Mohler, all from Pennsylvania State University, studied the effects of music genre and tempo on memory retention. They had four groups learn vocabulary words using one of four instrumental pieces - slow classical, slow jazz, fast classical, and fast jazz.
  • Surprisingly, the results showed that changing the genre had no effect on recall but changing the tempo decreased recall.
  • One key ingredient to the order of music from the baroque and classical periods is math. This is realized by the body and the human mind performs better when listening to this ordered music.
  • George recognized that Saul overcame his problems by using special music. With this story in mind King George asked George Frederick Handel to write some special music for him that would help him in the same way that music helped Saul. Handel wrote his Water Music for this purpose.
  • Dr. Ballam goes on to say that, "The human mind shuts down after three or four repetitions of a rhythm, or a melody, or a harmonic progression."
  • Bob Larson, a Christian minister and former rock musician, remembers that in the 70's teens would bring raw eggs to a rock concert and put them on the front of the stage. The eggs would be hard boiled by the music before the end of the concert and could be eaten. Dr. Earl W. Flosdorf and Dr. Leslie A. Chambers showed that proteins in a liquid medium were coagulated when subjected to piercing high-pitched sounds
  • Rock music was played in one of the boxes while Bach's music was played in the other box. The rats could choose to switch boxes through a tunnel that connected both boxes. Almost all of the rats chose to go into the box with the Bach music even after the type of music was switched from one box to the other.
  • She found that the plants grew well for almost every type of music except rock and acid rock. Jazz, classical, and Ravi Shankar turned out to be the most helpful to the plants. However, the plants tested with the rock music withered and died. The acid rock music also had negative effects on the plant growth.
  • One cannot deny the power of music. High school students who study music have higher grade point averages that those who don't. These students also develop faster physically. Student listening skills are also improved through music education. The top three schools in America all place a great emphasis on music and the arts. Hungary, Japan, and the Netherlands, the top three academic countries in the world, all place a great emphasis on music education and participation in music. The top engineers from Silicon Valley are all musicians. Napoleon understood the enormous power of music. He summed it up by saying, "Give me control over he who shapes the music of a nation, and I care not who makes the laws" .
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    Mozart's music and baroque music, with a 60 beats per minute beat pattern, activate the left and right brain. The simultaneous left and right brain action maximizes learning and retention of information. The information being studied activates the left brain while the music activates the right brain. Also, activities which engage both sides of the brain at the same time, such as playing an instrument or singing, causes the brain to be more capable of processing information.
Duane Sharrock

Bringing the world to innovation - MIT News Office - 0 views

  • mentions: a popular TED talk Smith gave in 2006 and Time magazine’s
  • D-Lab, the project aimed to develop creative solutions to problems facing people in the world’s least-affluent countries — and then hoped those residents would embrace the solutions.
  • Awareness of D-Lab has grown in recent years, thanks in part to some prominent mentions: a popular TED talk Smith gave in 2006 and Time magazine’s selection of her in 2010 as one of the world’s 100 most influential people.
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  • The program now employs about 20 people and encompasses 16 courses that reach about 400 students each year. Even though D-Lab does little to publicize its activities, staffers are increasingly hearing that this program was a major reason why participating students chose to attend MIT.
  • thanks to a major new U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) grant to D-Lab and MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning, D-Lab’s instructors and researchers will implement this strategy even more broadly — providing greater continuity to projects around the world, says D-Lab founder Amy Smith, a senior lecturer in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering.
  • with the new USAID support, “we can harness the alumni of IDDS as a kind of an extremely diverse and dispersed design consultancy,”
  • While some students have already managed to turn class projects into ongoing organizations — building better water filters in Africa, bicycle-powered washing machines in Latin America, and wheelchairs in India, for instance — the new funding should enable more such activities, Smith says, by “incubating ventures and training entrepreneurs.”
  • The emphasis has shifted,” Grau Serrat says, “more from designing for poor people to designing with poor people, or even design by poor people.”
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    Another reason some students are applying to MIT. Undergrads are making a difference globally. "the innovative MIT classes and field trips known collectively as D-Lab, the project aimed to develop creative solutions to problems facing people in the world's least-affluent countries - and then hoped those residents would embrace the solutions." "The program now employs about 20 people and encompasses 16 courses that reach about 400 students each year. Even though D-Lab does little to publicize its activities, staffers are increasingly hearing that this program was a major reason why participating students chose to attend MIT." "All of D-Lab's classes assess the needs of people in less-privileged communities around the world, examining innovations in technology, education or communications that might address those needs. The classes then seek ways to spread word of these solutions - and in some cases, to spur the creation of organizations to help disseminate them. Specific projects have focused on improved wheelchairs and prosthetics; water and sanitation systems; and recycling waste to produce useful products, including charcoal fuel made from agricultural waste."
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    "All of D-Lab's classes assess the needs of people in less-privileged communities around the world, examining innovations in technology, education or communications that might address those needs. The classes then seek ways to spread word of these solutions - and in some cases, to spur the creation of organizations to help disseminate them. Specific projects have focused on improved wheelchairs and prosthetics; water and sanitation systems; and recycling waste to produce useful products, including charcoal fuel made from agricultural waste."
Julian Ridden

100 Hard-To-Find iPhone Apps For School - Edudemic - 0 views

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    There are countless games, social media, and other time-sucking apps available right now in the App Store. But what about those students (and teachers) looking for a helpful app that actually helps them learn? If you peruse the 'education' category of the App Store you will see thousands of poorly organized apps that run the gamut from a $1,000 Bar Review app to a simple doodle app. Both are somewhat useful but only for a specific type of user. Fear not! We are here to help declutter the App Store for you. Below is a helpful list of apps that will save you hours of App Store-hunting and hopefully help you organize your day a bit better. From organization to the obligatory social media apps to the finance apps, this list, courtesy in part of RatedColleges, is pretty exhaustive. Know of another app? Let us know in the comments or on Twitter @edudemic!
anonymous

100+ Google Tricks That Will Save You Time in School | Online Colleges - 45 views

Matt S

The 100 Best Web 2.0 Classroom Tools Chosen By You | Edudemic - 0 views

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    The 100 Best Web 2.0 Classroom Tools Chosen By You Topics: best, cozi, edmodo, edublogs, google, guide, prezi, tools, top 10, vuvox, web 2.0, wiki
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