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Nigel Coutts

Learning with the New Science & Science Science - The Learner's Way - 3 views

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    In the final weeks of 2017 a new Science & Science Science for Kindergarten to Year Six slipped into the schools of New South Wales. What does this new Science bring and what does it reveal about the nature of learning as we approach the year 2020?
Judy Robison

SAS® Curriculum Pathways® | Overview - 2 views

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    SAS® Curriculum Pathways® provides innovative, web-based resources in the core disciplines, for grades 8-14. Topics are mapped to state and national standards.
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    Fully funded by SAS and offered at no cost to US educators and students, SAS Curriculum Pathways is designed to enhance student achievement and teacher effectiveness by providing Web-based Curriculum resources in all the core disciplines: English, math, Curriculum, social studies/history and Spanish, to educators and students in grades 8-14 in virtual schools, home schools, high schools and community colleges.
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    SAS Curriculum Pathways, which is used by thousands of teachers in more than 30 states, is now available for free to every educator in America. SAS Curriculum Pathways provides content in the core disciplines of English, mathematics, social studies, Curriculum and Spanish. Aligned with state standards, it has more than 200 InterActivities and 855 ready-to-use lessons that enable Curriculum-rich instruction and engage higher-order thinking skills. It is primarily for use in grades 8-12, though middle school content is in development.
J Black

The 21st Century Centurion: 21st Century Questions - 0 views

  • The report extended literacy to “Five New Basics” - English, mathematics, science, social studies, and computer science. A Nation At Risk specified that all high school graduates should be able to “understand the computer as an information, computation and communication device; students should be able to use the computer in the study of the other Basics and for personal and work-related purposes; and students should understand the world of computers, electronics, and related technologies."That was 1983 - twenty- six years ago. I ask you, Ben: Has education produced students with basic knowledge in the core disciplines and computer science TODAY? Are we there yet? OR - are we still at risk for not producing students with the essential skills for success in 1983?
    • J Black
       
      I had never really considered this before...how computer science has been totally left out of the equaltion....why is that? Cost of really delivering this would be enormous -- think how much money the districts would have to pour into the school systems.
  • On June 29, 1996, the U. S. Department of Education released Getting America's Students Ready for the 21st Century; Meeting the Technology Literacy Challenge, A Report to the Nation on Technology and Education. Recognizing the rapid changes in workplace needs and the vast challenges facing education, the Technology Literacy Challenge launched programs in the states that focused on a vision of the 21st century where all students are “technologically literate.” Four goals, relating primarily to Technology skills, were advanced that focused specifically on: 1.) Training and support for teachers; 2.) Acquisition of multimedia computers in classrooms; 3.) Connection to the Internet for every classroom; and 4.) Acquiring effective software and online learning resources integral to teaching the school's Technology.
    • J Black
       
      we are really stuck here....the training and support -- the acquisition of hardware, connectivity etc.
  • Our profession is failing miserably to respond to twenty-six years of policy, programs and even statutory requirements designed to improve the ability of students to perform and contribute in a high performance workplace. Our students are losing while we are debating.
    • J Black
       
      This is really, really well said here...bravo
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  • In 2007, The Report of the NEW Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce: Tough Choices or Tough Times made our nation hyperaware that "World market professionals are available in a wide range of fields for a fraction of what U.S. professionals charge." Guess what? While U.S. educators stuck learned heads in the sand, the world's citizens gained 21st century skills! Tough Choices spares no hard truth: "Our young adults score at “mediocre” levels on the best international measure of performance." Do you think it is an accident that the word "mediocre" is used? Let's see, I believe we saw it w-a-a-a-y back in 1983 when A Nation At Risk warned of a "tide of mediocrity." Tough Choices asks the hard question: "Will the world’s employers pick U.S. graduates when workers in Asia will work for much less? Then the question is answered. Our graduates will be chosen for global work "only if the U.S. worker can compete academically, exceed in creativity, learn quickly, and demonstrate a capacity to innovate." There they are
    • J Black
       
      This is exactly what dawns on students when they realize what globalization means for them..the incredibly stiff competition that it is posed to bring about.
  • “Learning is what most adults will do for a living in the 21st century."
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    The report extended literacy to "Five New Basics" - English, mathematics, science, social studies, and computer science. A Nation At Risk specified that all high school graduates should be able to "understand the computer as an information, computation and communication device; students should be able to use the computer in the study of the other Basics and for personal and work-related purposes; and students should understand the world of computers, electronics, and related technologies." That was 1983 - twenty- six years ago. I ask you, Ben: Has education produced students with basic knowledge in the core disciplines and computer science TODAY? Are we there yet? OR - are we still at risk for not producing students with the essential skills for success in 1983?
David Wetzel

To Blog or Not To Blog in Science or Math Class - 0 views

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    The primary purpose of blog is to facilitate interaction between a teacher and his or her students. This is possible because a blog is a dynamic tool which can be easily updated or transformed as necessary to meet the needs of a science or math class. The integration of blog science in a class requires an investment of time. Because of this commitment, additional evidence is needed to support the integration this science in a science or math class science.
Paul Beaufait

Curriculum21 - Clearinghouse - 31 views

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    Resources in dozens of categories: "21st Century Skills, Android Apps, Art, Arts, ASCD 2012, Assessment, Audio, Blogs, C21 Webinars, Career/Tech Ed, Chemistry, Chess, Common Core State Standards, Curriculum Mapping, Dictionary, Digital Literacies, Digital Storytelling, Digital Tools, Early Childhood, eCoaching, English/Language Arts, ePortfolios, Film, Games, Global, Global Education, Global Partnerships, Government, Grades 3-5, Health, Heritage, High, High School, History, Humanities, Images In the Classroom, Infographics, Interdisciplinary, Issues, iPad/iPhone Apps, K-2, Languages, Library-Media Literacy, LiveBook, Math, Media Arts, Middle School, Mobile Learning, Music, New Forms, News, Open Learning, Physical Education, Podcast, Professional Development, Provocations for Professionals, Reading, Repositories, Curriculum, Social Networking, Social Studies, Sustainability, Curriculum, The Arts, Theatre, Uncategorized, Videos, Webinars, World Languages, [and] Writing" (2012.08.29).
Nigel Coutts

Bringing Computational Thinking into the Primary Classroom - The Learner's Way - 4 views

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    Primary teachers in New South Wales (NSW) are this year and next integrating a new Science & Science Science. It brings with it a number of challenges and opportunities and while it has much in common with the existing Science, it will require some significant changes.
Jeff Johnson

Crossroads in Education: Issues for Web 2.0, Social Software, and Digital Tools - 1 views

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    We are at a crossroads in educating our youth. Since public schools became the norm for education, we've identified curriculum based on the social, political, and economic need. We've classified what counts into tight packages of content in subject areas as math, curriculum, social studies, and so on. Echoing Owen, Grant, Sayers, and Facer (2006), our approach to teaching and learning, including the order and how information is presented to students, the stages of assessment and what constitutes appropriate discussion on those subjects have also been tightly defined (p. 31). Advancements in curriculum, principally Web 2.0, social software, and digital tools, have challenged what it means to be educated and how we proceed to educate our youth in a culture where innovation and creativity, lifelong learning, personalization (my own learning space), and knowledge from and with the collective vie for a rightful place.
Sheri Edwards

Education Week: Backers of '21st-Century Skills' Take Flak - 0 views

  • Unless states that sign on to the movement ensure that all students are also taught a body of explicit, well-sequenced content, a focus on skills will not help students develop higher-order critical-thinking abilities, they said at a panel discussion here in the nation’s capital last week.
  • Array of Skills In the Partnership for 21st Century Skills’ vision for K-12 education, the arches of the rainbow depict outcomes, while the pools represent the resources needed to support those outcomes. But critics contend that states implementing this vision might focus too heavily on discrete skills instruction, at the expense of core content. SOURCE: Partnership for 21st Century Skills
  • Ten states have agreed to work with P21 to incorporate a focus on technology, analytical and communication skills into their content standards, teacher training, and assessments.
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  • “We’ve been having this curriculum war for years.”
  • “Teachers will rise to the challenge given the kind of supports they need.”
  • “[But] the liberal arts movement, which we embrace, has not been as purposeful and intentional about the skill outcomes as we need to be.”
  • Mr. Willingham argued not only that the teaching of skills is inseparable from that of core content, but also that it is the content itself that allows individuals to recognize problems and to determine which critical-thinking skills to apply to solve them.
  • Students become proficient critical thinkers only by gleaning a broad body of knowledge in multiple content domains, he said.
  • Those techniques include student-directed methods such as project-based learning, which requires students to work in groups to solve a specified problem, relying on teachers for guidance rather than for explicit instruction.
  • Mr. Kay, in contrast, painted the P21 vision as one that transcends this debate. The partnership tries to encourage states to be more deliberative about how they help students learn the skills,
  • “If [curriculum] is just picking up a manual, or a series of nonconnected or nonsequenced experiments in curriculum or literary works with no connection and no background knowledge, it’s not going to help our kids think any better,” she said in an interview.
  • Academics like Ms. Darling-Hammond said that setting forth a clear understanding once and for all about what students should know, and which teaching methods best help students engage that content in depth, will be crucial to putting such debates to rest.
  • The highest-scoring countries on international exams, she said, undertook efforts to outline such goals specifically 20 to 30 years ago. “When you really think about delivering a rich curriculum, it takes a very skillful type of teaching,” Ms. Darling-Hammond said. “It can be done badly; we have to acknowledge that. But we don’t really have a choice, if we want to join other nations.”
  • Meanwhile the critics go about squawking while promoting their own panaceas
  • he majority of kids just go right on tuning out, dropping out, or just getting by
  • I challenge what I read by looking at source material. These are timeless skills. It's the technology that is 21st century.
  • As for the topics we are unfamiliar with, the poster just before me rightly points out that the Internet is out there for just that purpose. Real teachers are also learners, and should be constantly seeking to know more.
  • Many recent studies have concluded that the current system is broken beyond repair and that point solutions like those being advocates above cannot fix it. We know that people learn best when they teach others so small groups that encourage peer-to-peer mentoring should be encouraged. Those same small groups require the students to learn and use the high-performance skills advocated by P21. At the same time, there is a body of knowledge that has been determined to be important to a student's future - represented by the state academic content standards. Robust, in-depth discussions of academic content help achieve the mastery of academic content. To ensure the content has meaning, it is best learned in a multi-disciplinary environment. By embedding a selected set of content standards from a variety of disciplines into a realistic setting/project the students get the opportunity to use the knowledge and go beyond the standards as their interest leads them.
  • The fact is, while "experts" pore over the fabric of pedagogical delivery methods, online teaching and learning is quietly replacing classroom environments globally. Educators better make some quick adjustments or the very definition of what an "education" means nowadays will make many of these folks irrelevant.
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    What do you think? How do we envision the future and teach for it?
Roland Gesthuizen

Paula Smith: Education 2020 -- An Emerging Consensus About Learning - 0 views

  • we need to add a truly human dimension to our educational benchmarks
  • First, an increasing number of people have concluded that we need to add a truly human dimension to our educational benchmarks.
  • if a lower school subject area like hands-on science is taught in a way that students understand, they go on to high school and college and explore biology, chemistry and physics with greater enthusiasm
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  • the new key metrics must be whether students find school interesting; whether the material challenges them; and whether they actually like school enough to continue their studies.
  • there are no limitations on what children can learn
  • children are preparing themselves to become lifelong learners when they question, analyze, compare, collaborate and listen in the classroom
  • teaching must be individualized and responsive to each student's talents, way of thinking and level of understanding
  • teachers act as coaches who model thinking, planning, risk-taking and reflection for children
  • Technology is transforming how we think about education today.
  • practice over time, plus motivation and mentoring, yields excellence and mastery
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    "as we contemplate 2020, I'm certain that there won't be one model, one benchmark, one standard, one curriculum, or one teacher training program that ultimately helps us reach our educational goals. But I strongly believe that a decade from now we'll be able to look back and know that we made learning more interesting for each and every child in our country"
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    How to make learning interesting for everybody.
Martin Burrett

West Baton Rouge Parish Schools - 0 views

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    A useful and fun set of cross-curriculum photo slide shows for maths, English, curriculum, history and more. They are arranged by age and range from kindergarten Secondary school. A great resource for introducing topics. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Video%2C+animation%2C+film+%26+Webcams
Martin Burrett

Educational Videos - The Best Educational Videos Online | Educational Videos Directory - 30 views

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    A site with hundreds of educational videos from every corner of the curriculum and for students of all ages. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Video,+animation,+film+&+Webcams
J Black

Where's the Innovation? | always learning - 0 views

  • Tom refers to this as the “Red Queen Effect” after a scene in Alice’s Adventures Through the Looking Glass, where Alice is shocked to be standing in the same place after running quite fast for an extended period of time and the Red Queen explains, “if you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that.”
  • nother Hong Kong presenter, Stephen Heppell, was also careful to emphasize that the biggest challenge today is the pace of change: exponential. With this rapid pace of change there is no time for the “staircase mentality” (pilot, review etc).
  • what are we mistakenly not valuing now?
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  • Tom explained that innovation falls squarely in quadrant 2 of Steven Covey’s matrix: it’s “Important”, but “Not Urgent”. For example, we absolutely have to have a new math/science/reading/social studies program. The teachers can’t teach without one, so picking a new one is going to fall in quadrant 1, and ultimately, innovation gets put off until tomorrow. However, innovation has an urgency all its own and those that don’t place innovation as a priority will find themselves displaced.
  • his is a good example of the difficulty people face in conceptually realizing the advantages of bold innovation: we naturally assume that slow steady progress will be best (as we are taught from an early age, when the tortoise wins the race).
  • The time for innovation is now, as Stephen described (and Marco Torres’ slide below emphasizes), “learning is at a crossroads:” we’re looking at a choice between productivity and new approaches, those new approaches being: student portfolios; making huge leaps in our model of education, not tiny steps forward; working to produce ingenious, engaged, inspired, surprising, collegiate students; and developing learning experiences that are open-ended, project-focused, multidisciplinary.
  • I can’t remember who said this first but, “technology is just an amplifier” - technology doesn’t change the quality of teaching or learning, it will only amplify it, either in a positive or negative way. What we need to be looking at is changing our approaches to learning, not modifying our technology to a “newer” version of what we’ve already had for the past 20 years.
  • bsolutely fabulous. This is great stuff. I just wrote a post on Thursday arguing that the “learning management system” paradigm prevents innovation and change. If we don’t break out of it, we’re destined to get out-innovated, as you suggest.
  • I came across a great quote from Frank Tibolt this morning: “We should be taught not to wait for inspiration to start a thing. Action always generates inspiration. Inspiration seldom generates action.”
  • “The best way to predict the future is to invent it.” - Alan Kay
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    Tom explained that innovation falls squarely in quadrant 2 of Steven Covey's matrix: it's "Important", but "Not Urgent".
darren mccarty

Study for the upcoming Advanced Placement Exams!! - 0 views

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    A collection of multiple choice games on topics across the curriculum, including maths, curriculum and English. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Cross+Curricular
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    Hundreds of practice games for your AP students!!
qtvtutor

math online - Learn basics of math online with qtutor | Project of ARY Tech. Qtutor is designed to help you solve your math problems. We offers thousands of online maths practice skills covering preschool - 0 views

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    Math online lessons and math online homework help | Qtutor offers thousands of online maths practice skills. Qtutor provides free Math online help and worksheets. Take our math online courses in Pre-algebra, PSAT, SAT, ACT, GRE, GMAT and Geometry.
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    Qtutor is designed to help you solve your math problems. We offers thousands of online maths practice skills covering preschool through grade 12 maths. We make learning fun, game-oriented, and give you ways to get involved. Qtutor.com provide coverage of Levels 1 to 6 of The all Curriculum
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