Skip to main content

Home/ Classroom 2.0/ Group items matching "curriculum questions" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Nigel Coutts

Shaping the Curriculum - Exploring Integration - The Learner's Way - 11 views

  •  
    After two days of talking about curriculum, integration, STEM, STEAM and HASS I am left with more curriculum than I started with. In some respects, the concept of curriculum integration is simple. It is after all something that Primary teachers almost take for granted. But for Senior and Tertiary educators the question of curriculum integration is inherently complex. At all levels curriculum emerge of what curriculum integration might achieve, what purposes it serves, what it could and should look like and how it should be supported by curriculum planners. In the current climate, with its debate around the role of education within an innovation economy, shaped by technology and confronting demands for a STEAM enabled workforce the shape of our curriculum is under pressure. 
David McGavock

CITE Journal - Editorial - 21 views

  • A classroom that has successfully integrated technology into the curriculum would be one where you would not really notice it because it would be so second nature. The teacher would not have to think up ways to use whatever tools were available, but would seamlessly use them to enhance the learning of whatever content was being covered. Technology [would be] used to assist in acquiring content knowledge, and the acquisition of technology skills [would be] secondary. Contrast this depiction with what the International Society for Technology in Education’s (ISTE) National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S; ISTE, 2002) say about technology integration: curriculum integration with the use of technology involves the infusion of technology as a tool to enhance the learning in a content area or multidisciplinary setting….Effective integration of technology is achieved when students are able to select technology tools to help them obtain information in a timely manner, analyze and synthesize the information, and present it professionally. The technology should become an integral part of how the classroom functions—as accessible as all other classroom tools.
  • his urging to shift the focus from the learning tools to what is being learned and how that learning happens still needs to be heeded—almost 20 years later.
  • Integration is defined not by the amount or type of technology used, but by how and why it is used.
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • many of these technology-specific studies did not explore more fundamental issues in technology and education
  • what needs to be further developed, examined, and shared
  • particular curriculum standards-based instructional strategies that are appropriately matched to students’ learning needs and preferences
  • understanding the processes and interim results of how and why specific tools can and should be appropriated
  • help students with distinct needs and preferences to achieve identified learning goals.
  • the STaR Chart
  • According to the national StaR Chart, then, technology use in what is typically described as “constructivist” learning is preferable to technology used to “reinforce basic academic skills.”
  • Constructivists view people as constructive agents and view the phenomenon of interest (meaning or knowledge) as built instead of passively “received”
  • curriculum-based integration of educational technologies – defined in Education and Technology: An Encyclopedia (Kovalchick & Dawson, 2004) as “the effective integration of technology throughout the curriculum to help students meet the standards and outcomes of each lesson, unit, or activity”
  • As discerning educators and researchers, we should question why teachers’ roles “must” change to integrate technology effectively into K-12 curricula.
  • the technologies themselves do not require this shift
  • Though teachers in the nationally representative sample they studied acknowledged that computers helped them to change instructional practice over time, they cited experience, organized professional learning, and school culture as the primary factors provoking instructional changes.
  • In districts in which teachers’ academic freedom is preserved—at least in part—aren’t the pedagogical approaches to be used the result of decisions that each teacher makes, preferably rooted in a well-informed knowledge base of both students’ learning needs and preferences and corresponding methodological alternatives?
  • Can it really be assumed that a particular approach “works best” in all teaching, learning, school, district, and community contexts?
  • perhaps a new approach is warranted at this point in time—one that genuinely respects pedagogical plurality and honors teachers’ academic freedom.
  •  
    A classroom that has successfully integrated technology into the curriculum would be one where you would not really notice it because it would be so second nature. The teacher would not have to think up ways to use whatever tools were available, but would seamlessly use them to enhance the learning of whatever content was being covered. Technology [would be] used to assist in acquiring content knowledge, and the acquisition of technology skills [would be] secondary. Contrast this depiction with what the International Society for Technology in Education's (ISTE) National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S; ISTE, 2002) say about technology integration: curriculum integration with the use of technology involves the infusion of technology as a tool to enhance the learning in a content area or multidisciplinary setting….Effective integration of technology is achieved when students are able to select technology tools to help them obtain information in a timely manner, analyze and synthesize the information, and present it professionally. The technology should become an integral part of how the classroom functions-as accessible as all other classroom tools.
Nigel Coutts

A curriculum built on the fundamental curriculum of our disciplines - The Learner's Way - 6 views

  •  
    As we make plans for how we will engage our students in their learning the decisions we make become fundamental to how they will grow to understand the purposes of learning. How our learners approach the curriculum and the disciplines is fundamental to the outcomes we may achieve for them. One path will set them up to view learning as the acquisition of information the other to see it as a process of asking and exploring curriculum of significance through the many unique lenses.
Leah Evans

Contractions - 0 views

  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put together and an apostrophe is added to replace the omitted letters.
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put together
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put together
  • ...50 more annotations...
  • together
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put  
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put  
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put  
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put  
  • put  
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put
  • Contractions are formed when two words are contracted or put  
  • Contractions
  • are formed
  • Contractions
  • Word Lists Analogies - New!CapitonymsCompound Words - New!  Contractions Dolch - Sight WordsGeography ListsHomophones, Homonyms, etc.Literature Based Word ListsMath Vocabulary - Most Popular!Monthly Holiday ListsMultiple Meaning Words - New!Phonics & Sight Word CurriculumPossessive NounsSample Lists By GradeScience Vocabulary - New!Sequential Spelling ProgramSound Alike WordsSyllables - New!Word Abbreviations Help and InformationFAQs - Frequently Asked CurriculumPrintablesOur Educational AwardsTestmonials- New!Custom Sentences and Definitions Handwriting WorksheetsStudent Writing PracticeTeacher Training VideosGetting Started Welcome LettersFunding Sources - New! ArticlesResearch on Spelling AutomaticityThe Importance of SpellingRecommended Learning ResourcesImprove your writing skillsAdopt-A-ClassroomSpellingCity and NCom  put ingReading ComprehensionIncorporating Spelling Into ReadingWriting Prompts that Motivate   Contractions Contractions
  • when two words
  • are contracted or
  • are contracted
  • are contracted or put
  • are contracted or put
  • Contractions  
  • Contractions
  • Contractions
  • are contracted or put  
  • Contractions
  • Contractions  
  • Contractions
  • Word Lists Analogies - New! Capitonyms Compound Words - New!    Contractions Dolch - Sight Words Geography Lists Homophones, Homonyms, etc. Literature Based Word Lists Math Vocabulary - Most Popular! Monthly Holiday Lists Multiple Meaning Words - New! Phonics & Sight Word Curriculum Possessive Nouns Sample Lists By Grade Science Vocabulary - New! Sequential Spelling Program Sound Alike Words Syllables - New! Word Abbreviations Help and Information FAQs - Frequently Asked Curriculum Printables Our Educational Awards Testmonials - New! Custom Sentences and Definitions Handwriting Worksheets Student Writing Practice Teacher Training Videos Getting Started Welcome Letters Funding Sources - New! Articles Research on Spelling Automaticity The Importance of Spelling Recommended Learning Resources Improve your writing skills Adopt-A-Classroom SpellingCity and NCom   put ing Reading Comprehension Incorporating Spelling Into Reading Writing Prompts that Motivate   Contractions Contractions
  • tractions
  • Contraction
  • Contractions
  • Contractions  are
  • are contracted or put  
  • Contractions   are formed  when two words are contracted or put  together
  • are contracted or put   together
  • are
  • are contracted or put
  • Contractions   are formed   when two words are contracted or put   together
  • are contracted or
  • are contracted
  • are contracted
  • are contracted or
  • are contracted or
  • are
  • are
  • contracted or
  • are contracted or
  • are contracted or
  • are contracted
  • are contracted
  • are contracted or
  • are contracted
  • when two words are contracted or put
  •  
    Free games to reinforce the usage and spelling of contractions.
Kathleen Porter

Educational Leadership:Technology-Rich Learning:Students First, Not Stuff - 0 views

  • What Do We Mean by Learning?
  • allowing students to pursue their interests in the context of the curriculum
  • Teachers must be colearners with kids, expert at asking great, open-ended questions and modeling the learning process required to answer those questions. Teachers should be master learners in the classroom
  • ...13 more annotations...
  • What Does It Mean to Be Literate?
  • What Does It Mean to Be Educated?
  • What Do Students Need to Know?
  • developing the skills and dispositions necessary for them to learn whatever they need to learn whenever they need to learn it? That means rethinking classrooms to focus on individual passions, inquiry, creation, sharing, patient problem solving, and innovation
  • start with the questions that focus on our students
  • Instead of helping our students become "college ready," we might be better off making them "learning ready," prepared for any opportunity that might present itself down the road
  • With access, and with a full set of skills and literacies to use this access well, we now have the power to create our own education in any number of ways
  • manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information
  • Some, like Stanford professor Howard Rheingold, believe that technology now requires an attention literacy—the ability to exert some degree of mental control over our use of technology rather than simply being distracted by it—for users to be productive. Professor Henry Jenkins at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) advocates for transmedia literacy, which includes networking and performance skills that take advantage of this connected, audience-rich moment.
  • it's about addressing the new needs of modern learners in entirely new ways. And once we understand that it's about learning, our questions reframe themselves in terms of the ecological shifts we need to make: What do we mean by learning? What does it mean to be literate in a networked, connected world? What does it mean to be educated? What do students need to know and be able to do to be successful in their futures? Educators must lead inclusive conversations in their communities around such questions to better inform decisions about technology and change
  • Right now, we should be asking ourselves not just how to do school better, but how to do it decidedly differently
  • Learning is now truly participatory in real-world contexts. The transformation occurs in that participation, that connection with other learners outside school walls with whom we can converse, create, and publish authentic, meaningful, beautiful work
  • what do we do as schools become just one of many places in both the real and virtual world where our students can get an education? Welcome to what portends to be the messiest, most upheaval-filled 10 years in education that any of us has ever seen. Resistance, as they say, is futile
  •  
    "Putting technology first-simply adding a layer of expensive tools on top of the traditional curriculum-does nothing to address the new needs of modern learners."
Nigel Coutts

The purpose of education - The Learner's Way - 16 views

  •  
    Behind the rhetoric and politics, education is about the outcomes it achieves for its learners. More than being about the nuances of technology, learning space design, curriculum structures and pedagogical practices schools should have effective answers to curriculum that focus on what they hope to achieve for their learners. How we answer this question should then dictate the measures we utilise to achieve these goals and it is to these ends that we must apply our efforts.
  •  
    Happy mothers day 2016 quotes
Nigel Coutts

Sharing our Puzzles of Practice - The Learner's Way - 5 views

  •  
    Einstein is often quoted as having said "If I have an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes." Clearly Einstein understood how to attack puzzling problems. As teachers we face a host of puzzles on a daily basis. Every student we teach, thanks to their idiosyncrasies presents a unique puzzle. The interactions between students further complicates things. Our goals for our learners, their learning needs, the demands of the curriculum, pressures from beyond the classroom all result in puzzles for us to manage and to solve.
Roland Gesthuizen

Paula Smith: Education 2020 -- An Emerging Consensus About Learning - 0 views

  • we need to add a truly human dimension to our educational benchmarks
  • First, an increasing number of people have concluded that we need to add a truly human dimension to our educational benchmarks.
  • if a lower school subject area like hands-on science is taught in a way that students understand, they go on to high school and college and explore biology, chemistry and physics with greater enthusiasm
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • the new key metrics must be whether students find school interesting; whether the material challenges them; and whether they actually like school enough to continue their studies.
  • there are no limitations on what children can learn
  • children are preparing themselves to become lifelong learners when they question, analyze, compare, collaborate and listen in the classroom
  • teaching must be individualized and responsive to each student's talents, way of thinking and level of understanding
  • teachers act as coaches who model thinking, planning, risk-taking and reflection for children
  • Technology is transforming how we think about education today.
  • practice over time, plus motivation and mentoring, yields excellence and mastery
  •  
    "as we contemplate 2020, I'm certain that there won't be one model, one benchmark, one standard, one curriculum, or one teacher training program that ultimately helps us reach our educational goals. But I strongly believe that a decade from now we'll be able to look back and know that we made learning more interesting for each and every child in our country"
  •  
    How to make learning interesting for everybody.
Maggie Verster

21st century learning wiki - 0 views

  •  
    Vision & Philosophy 21st Century Learner Enduring Understandings & Essential Questions Roles & Responsibilities Questions Planning Planning a 21C Unit
Martin Burrett

Mathopolis - Math Games - 0 views

  •  
    A superb place to find games and questions for the whole of the maths questions. Join for free to track progress or just play the games. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Maths
Scott Kinkoph

A Great Rubric for Using Technology in K-8 ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning - 0 views

  •  
    "This document serves as a guide to how the basic technology unit content varies across grade levels. Units are guided by essential questions and  skills for each grade level and are categorized to show the scope of skills across the questions. Each unit is tied to these main competencies: Communicate, Evaluate, Collaborate, Create"
J Black

The 21st Century Centurion: 21st Century Questions - 0 views

  • The report extended literacy to “Five New Basics” - English, mathematics, science, social studies, and computer science. A Nation At Risk specified that all high school graduates should be able to “understand the computer as an information, computation and communication device; students should be able to use the computer in the study of the other Basics and for personal and work-related purposes; and students should understand the world of computers, electronics, and related technologies."That was 1983 - twenty- six years ago. I ask you, Ben: Has education produced students with basic knowledge in the core disciplines and computer science TODAY? Are we there yet? OR - are we still at risk for not producing students with the essential skills for success in 1983?
    • J Black
       
      I had never really considered this before...how computer science has been totally left out of the equaltion....why is that? Cost of really delivering this would be enormous -- think how much money the districts would have to pour into the school systems.
  • On June 29, 1996, the U. S. Department of Education released Getting America's Students Ready for the 21st Century; Meeting the Technology Literacy Challenge, A Report to the Nation on Technology and Education. Recognizing the rapid changes in workplace needs and the vast challenges facing education, the Technology Literacy Challenge launched programs in the states that focused on a vision of the 21st century where all students are “technologically literate.” Four goals, relating primarily to technology skills, were advanced that focused specifically on: 1.) Training and support for teachers; 2.) Acquisition of multimedia computers in classrooms; 3.) Connection to the Internet for every classroom; and 4.) Acquiring effective software and online learning resources integral to teaching the school's curriculum.
    • J Black
       
      we are really stuck here....the training and support -- the acquisition of hardware, connectivity etc.
  • Our profession is failing miserably to respond to twenty-six years of policy, programs and even statutory requirements designed to improve the ability of students to perform and contribute in a high performance workplace. Our students are losing while we are debating.
    • J Black
       
      This is really, really well said here...bravo
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • In 2007, The Report of the NEW Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce: Tough Choices or Tough Times made our nation hyperaware that "World market professionals are available in a wide range of fields for a fraction of what U.S. professionals charge." Guess what? While U.S. educators stuck learned heads in the sand, the world's citizens gained 21st century skills! Tough Choices spares no hard truth: "Our young adults score at “mediocre” levels on the best international measure of performance." Do you think it is an accident that the word "mediocre" is used? Let's see, I believe we saw it w-a-a-a-y back in 1983 when A Nation At Risk warned of a "tide of mediocrity." Tough Choices asks the hard question: "Will the world’s employers pick U.S. graduates when workers in Asia will work for much less? Then the question is answered. Our graduates will be chosen for global work "only if the U.S. worker can compete academically, exceed in creativity, learn quickly, and demonstrate a capacity to innovate." There they are
    • J Black
       
      This is exactly what dawns on students when they realize what globalization means for them..the incredibly stiff competition that it is posed to bring about.
  • “Learning is what most adults will do for a living in the 21st century."
  •  
    The report extended literacy to "Five New Basics" - English, mathematics, science, social studies, and computer science. A Nation At Risk specified that all high school graduates should be able to "understand the computer as an information, computation and communication device; students should be able to use the computer in the study of the other Basics and for personal and work-related purposes; and students should understand the world of computers, electronics, and related technologies." That was 1983 - twenty- six years ago. I ask you, Ben: Has education produced students with basic knowledge in the core disciplines and computer science TODAY? Are we there yet? OR - are we still at risk for not producing students with the essential skills for success in 1983?
Jeff Johnson

Center for Media Literacy - 0 views

  •  
    Now altogether in one place, the components of inquiry-based media literacy using the Five Core Concepts and CML's Five Key Questions of Media Literacy for Deconstruction and Construction. Q/TIPS™ addresses Questions from the viewpoints of both consumers and producers of media messages, enabling participation in a global media culture.
Ruth Howard

Place-Based Education | Promise of Place - Enriching Lives Through Place-Based Education - 0 views

  •  
    Quote "Place-based education (PBE) immerses students in local heritage, cultures, landscapes, opportunities and experiences, using these as a foundation for the study of language arts, mathematics, social studies, science and other subjects across the curriculum. PBE emphasizes learning through participation in service projects for the local school and/or community. Research has shown that well-designed initiatives can achieve the goals outlined below. Learn more about the principles of place-based education and answers to frequently asked curriculum." PBE is Project-Based learning.
Tero Toivanen

iQ Academy Wisconsin Frequently Asked Questions - 0 views

  •  
    Students enrolled in iQ Academy Wisconsin do their learning at home, but they are participating in a program of the School District of Waukesha. The curriculum is approved by the school district for earning middle and high school credits that can lead to a high school diploma through iQ Academy and the School District of Waukesha.
Randy Rodgers

How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Wired Business | Wired.com - 0 views

  • Decentralized systems have proven to be more productive and agile than rigid, top-down ones
  • And yet the dominant model of public education is still fundamentally rooted in the industrial revolution that spawned it, when workplaces valued punctuality, regularity, attention, and silence above all else.
  • We don’t openly profess those values nowadays, but our educational system—which routinely tests kids on their ability to recall information and demonstrate mastery of a narrow set of skills—doubles down on the view that students are material to be processed, programmed, and quality-tested. School administrators prepare curriculum standards and “pacing guides” that tell teachers what to teach each day. Legions of managers supervise everything that happens in the classroom; in 2010 only 50 percent of public school staff members in the US were teachers.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • In 1970 the top three skills required by the Fortune 500 were the three Rs: reading, writing, and arithmetic. In 1999 the top three skills in demand were teamwork, problem-solving, and interpersonal skills
  • Teachers provide prompts, not answers, and then they step aside
  • “schools in the cloud,”
  • There will be no teachers, curriculum, or separation into age groups—just six or so computers and a woman to look after the kids’ safety. His defining principle: “The children are completely in charge.”
  • as the kids blasted through the questions, they couldn’t help noticing that it felt easy, as if they were being asked to do something very basic.
  •  
    Must. Read. Such a valuable lesson and another example of how we are doing it wrong.
Al Tucker

Welcome | Teaching Copyright - 51 views

  •  
    Teaching Copyright curriculum is a detailed, customizable learning plan to help educators raise interesting curriculum about copyright, technology, and law, such as: * What is legal online? * How is creativity being enabled by new technologies? * What digital rights and responsibilities exist already, and what roles do we play as users of digital technology?
Dennis OConnor

FAQ Information Literacy Online Classes - 0 views

  • How many hours a week will this take? Courses take about 5 hours per week. (You can certainly spend more time if you wish.) Will I be working alone or with a group? You'll be working with an online teacher who monitors the course on a daily basis. Our classes are fully moderated. That means you're working with a facilitator and other members of the class to learn together. You'll be able to get help, ask questions, and learn from both the facilitator and other participants.
  • Can I preview the courses? Yes, follow the link below to our Moodle online learning system . When prompted, login as a guest. This allows you to see an outline version of the courses without enrolling.
  • Do you have free materials? Yes, almost all of our materials are free online at 21cif.com. You'll find many years of research based curriculum materials on our site. We support our research project by offering online classes, conference presentations, and custom online programming for educational and corporate clients.
  •  
    Frequently asked questions about Information Fluency / Information literacy moodle based online classes.
Leonard Miller

How 21st Century Thinking Is Just Different - 0 views

  • this world full of information abundance, our minds are constantly challenged to react to data, and often in a way that doesn’t just observe, but interprets. Subsequently, we unknowingly “spin” everything to avoid cognitive dissonance
  • Instead, we might consider constant reflection guided by important questions as a new way to learn in the presence of information abundance.
  • Information Abundance There is more information available to any student with a smartphone than an entire empire would have had access to three thousand years ago
  • ...13 more annotations...
  • Truth may not change, but information does. And in the age of social media, it divides and duplicates in a frenzied kind of digital mitosis.
  • Specifically, new habits of mind. Persisting. Managing impulsivity. Responding with awe. Questioning. Innovating. Thinking interdependently.
  • learn
  • If the 20th century model was to measure the accuracy and ownership of information, the 21st century’s model is form and interdependence
  • learning options today don’t just abound, they dwarf formal learning institutions in every way but clout with the power-holders—parents, teachers, deans, and curriculum designers
  • Habits, by nature, are reflexive, accessible, and adaptable–not unlike knowledge. This is a can’t-miss point. Internalized and reflexive cognitive patterns that are called upon intrinsically, and transfer seamlessly.
  • all else, the 21st century
  • learner
  • Above
  • needs for self-knowledge and authentic local placement, two very broad ideas that come from patient thinking
  • Persistence. Managing Impulsivity. Responding with awe.
  • Old learning forms focused on the thinker rather than the thoughts, the source rather than the information, and correctly citing that source over understanding what made that information worth extracting
  • The tone of thinking in the 21st century should not be hushed nor gushing, defiant nor assimilating, but simply interdependent, conjured to function on a relevant scale within a much larger human and intellectual ecology, one that exposes itself daily across twitter, facebook, and a billion smartphone screens.
  •  
    Beautiful description of 21st century thinking
1 - 20 of 22 Next ›
Showing 20 items per page