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Carlos Quintero

Innovate: Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software - 0 views

  • Web 2.0 has inspired intense and growing interest, particularly as wikis, weblogs (blogs), really simple syndication (RSS) feeds, social networking sites, tag-based folksonomies, and peer-to-peer media-sharing applications have gained traction in all sectors of the education industry (Allen 2004; Alexander 2006)
  • Web 2.0 allows customization, personalization, and rich opportunities for networking and collaboration, all of which offer considerable potential for addressing the needs of today's diverse student body (Bryant 2006).
  • In contrast to earlier e-learning approaches that simply replicated traditional models, the Web 2.0 movement with its associated array of social software tools offers opportunities to move away from the last century's highly centralized, industrial model of learning and toward individual learner empowerment through designs that focus on collaborative, networked interaction (Rogers et al. 2007; Sims 2006; Sheely 2006)
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  • learning management systems (Exhibit 1).
  • The reality, however, is that today's students demand greater control of their own learning and the inclusion of technologies in ways that meet their needs and preferences (Prensky 2005)
  • Tools like blogs, wikis, media-sharing applications, and social networking sites can support and encourage informal conversation, dialogue, collaborative content generation, and knowledge sharing, giving learners access to a wide range of ideas and representations. Used appropriately, they promise to make truly learner-centered education a reality by promoting learner agency, autonomy, and engagement in social networks that straddle multiple real and virtual communities by reaching across physical, geographic, institutional, and organizational boundaries.
  • "I have always imagined the information space as something to which everyone has immediate and intuitive access, and not just to browse, but to create” (2000, 216). Social software tools make it easy to contribute ideas and content, placing the power of media creation and distribution into the hands of "the people formerly known as the audience" (Rosen 2006).
  • the most promising settings for a pedagogy that capitalizes on the capabilities of these tools are fully online or blended so that students can engage with peers, instructors, and the community in creating and sharing ideas. In this model, some learners engage in creative authorship, producing and manipulating digital images and video clips, tagging them with chosen keywords, and making this content available to peers worldwide through Flickr, MySpace, and YouTube
  • Student-centered tasks designed by constructivist teachers reach toward this ideal, but they too often lack the dimension of real-world interactivity and community engagement that social software can contribute.
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of Teaching and learning (Exhibit 2).
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of Teaching and learning
  • Pedagogy 2.0 is defined by: Content: Microunits that augment thinking and cognition by offering diverse perspectives and representations to learners and learner-generated resources that accrue from students creating, sharing, and revising ideas; Curriculum: Syllabi that are not fixed but dynamic, open to negotiation and learner input, consisting of bite-sized modules that are interdisciplinary in focus and that blend formal and informal learning;Communication: Open, peer-to-peer, multifaceted communication using multiple media types to achieve relevance and clarity;Process: Situated, reflective, integrated thinking processes that are iterative, dynamic, and performance and inquiry based;Resources: Multiple informal and formal sources that are rich in media and global in reach;Scaffolds: Support for students from a network of peers, teachers, experts, and communities; andLearning tasks: Authentic, personalized, learner-driven and learner-designed, experiential tasks that enable learners to create content.
  • Instructors implementing Pedagogy 2.0 principles will need to work collaboratively with learners to review, edit, and apply quality assurance mechanisms to student work while also drawing on input from the wider community outside the classroom or institution (making use of the "wisdom of crowds” [Surowiecki 2004]).
  • A small portion of student performance content—if it is new knowledge—will be useful to keep. Most of the student performance content will be generated, then used, and will become stored in places that will never again see the light of day. Yet . . . it is still important to understand that the role of this student content in learning is critical.
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts. In so doing, learners generate their own personal rules and knowledge structures, using them to make sense of their experiences and refining them through interaction and dialogue with others.
  • Other divides are evident. For example, the social networking site Facebook is now the most heavily trafficked Web site in the United States with over 8 million university students connected across academic communities and institutions worldwide. The majority of Facebook participants are students, and teachers may not feel welcome in these communities. Moreover, recent research has shown that many students perceive teaching staff who use Facebook as lacking credibility as they may present different self-images online than they do in face-to-face situations (Mazer, Murphy, and Simonds 2007). Further, students may perceive instructors' attempts to coopt such social technologies for educational purposes as intrusions into their space. Innovative teachers who wish to adopt social software tools must do so with these attitudes in mind.
  • "students want to be able to take content from other people. They want to mix it, in new creative ways—to produce it, to publish it, and to distribute it"
  • Furthermore, although the advent of Web 2.0 and the open-content movement significantly increase the volume of information available to students, many higher education students lack the competencies necessary to navigate and use the overabundance of information available, including the skills required to locate quality sources and assess them for objectivity, reliability, and currency
  • In combination with appropriate learning strategies, Pedagogy 2.0 can assist students in developing such critical thinking and metacognitive skills (Sener 2007; McLoughlin, Lee, and Chan 2006).
  • We envision that social technologies coupled with a paradigm of learning focused on knowledge creation and community participation offer the potential for radical and transformational shifts in teaching and learning practices, allowing learners to access peers, experts, and the wider community in ways that enable reflective, self-directed learning.
  • . By capitalizing on personalization, participation, and content creation, existing and future Pedagogy 2.0 practices can result in educational experiences that are productive, engaging, and community based and that extend the learning landscape far beyond the boundaries of classrooms and educational institutions.
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    About pedagogic 2.0
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    Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software Catherine McLoughlin and Mark J. W. Lee
Maggie Verster

Thoughts on Setting up a Student Created Wiki - 22 views

  • hat is, as we already know, the technology itself does not develop the skill, nor is it the teacher; the technology is only a tool, and teachers must remain committed to the collaborative process if students are to fully engage and develop the skills necessary to work collaboratively with their peers
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    T This really brought it home: "as we already know, the technology itself does not develop the skill, nor is it the teacher; the technology is only a tool, and teachers must remain committed to the collaborative process if students are to fully engage and develop the skills necessary to work collaboratively with their peers"
Peter Shanks

21st Century Skills are so last century! - 64 views

  • Young people communicate and collaborate every few minutes – it’s an obsession. They text, MSN, BBM, Myspace, Facebook, Facebook message, Facebook chat and Skype. Note the absence of email and Twitter. Then there’s Spotify, Soundcloud, Flickr, YouTube and Bitorrent to share, tag, upload and download experiences, comments, photographs, video and media. They also collaborate closely in parties when playing games. Never have the young shared so much, so often in so many different ways. Then along comes someone who wants to teach them this so called 21st C skill, usually in a classroom, where all of this is banned.
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    "I'm always amused at this conceit, that we adults, especially in education, think we even have the skills we claim we want to teach. There is no area of human endeavour that is less collaborative than education."
Thomas Galvez

IB ITGS Global Collaboration Project - 0 views

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    If you teach IB ITGS and are interested in doing a global collaboration project for the Business & Employment Area of Impact, please contact me. We need another school or two. This collaborative project will occur around February 2009.
Nigel Coutts

Learning to love teach meets - The Learner's Way - 10 views

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    There is a growing momentum in education driven by a desire to share our practice and learn from our colleagues. Increasingly teachers are finding ways to break free of their classrooms and share their ideas. Collaborations in the interests of unlocking the collective potential of the profession are spreading within and importantly between schools. For many these collaborative endeavours and desires are satisfied by online communities but for many the possibility for a face to face conversation is more alluring.
David Wetzel

Tips for Using Skype in the Classroom: Teaching Strategies for Ensuring Successful Use of this Online Tool - 0 views

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    25 Collaborative learning strategies, teaching tips and techniques, and classroom management techniques are provided to assist teachers and students using Skype.
Fatima Anwar

The Integrated Learning Platform: Cardiff Univeristy - Cardiff is everything a good university should be - 0 views

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    Cardiff University is recognized in independent government tests as one of The British leading educating and analysis colleges. Established by Royal Charter in 1883, the University today brings together impressive modern facilities and a powerful approach to educating and analysis with its proud culture of service and accomplishment. Cardiff University is the biggest University of mature education and learning in Wales, with the Cardiff Center for Long term Studying offering several hundred programs in locations across Southern Eastern Wales. The University's lifelong learning actions also include the professional growth work performed by educational institutions for companies, and many of these is custom-made to match an individual business's needs. The Center also provides business terminology training at all levels. Founded: 1883. Structural features: Merged with University of Wales College of Medicine (UCWM) in 2004. Location: Close to Cardiff city center. Healthcare care learners also at hospital website, Heath Recreation area University, 1 mile away. Getting there: Cardiff Primary Place on the national train network; trainers to bus station (next to train station); M4 from London and M5 (west county and Midlands). For school, frequent teaches from Primary Place to Cathays station (on campus), regional vehicles from bus station (53, 79, 81 for main campus; 8 or 9 for hospital site). Academic features: 4-year incorporated food techniques, 5-year two-tier techniques in structure and town planning. 5-year medical and dental programs, plus foundation season for those without science backgrounds; medical teaching throughout Wales. Awarding body: Cardiff University; Wales University for some healthcare programs. Main undergrad awards: BA, BD, BDS, BMus, BN, BSc, BEng, BScEcon, LLB, BArch, MB BCh, MPhys, MChem, MEng, MPharm. Length of courses: 3 years; others 4 and 5 decades. Library & IT facilities: Integrated collection,
Nigel Coutts

Collaboration & Connectedness the Key to Quality Collaboration - 25 views

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    Most teachers recognise the potential for collaboration between students and the importance of it as a component of a 21st Century education and yet many do not take full advantage of the opportunities they have for collaboration as teachers.
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    goodby 2015 welcome 2016 to all friends
Tero Toivanen

Education Futures - The role of teachers in Education 3.0 - 0 views

  • Download-style education fails when we try to provide students with knowledge and skills that will enable them to lead in a future that is very different from what exists today –and, in a future that defies human imagination.
  • Teaching in Education 3.0 requires a new form of co-constructivism that provides meaningful extensions to Dewey, Vygotsky and Freire, while building the future.
  • Specifically, teaching in Education 3.0 necessitates a Leapfrog approach with: Adults who are eager to imagine, create and innovate with kids Kids and adults who want to learn more about each other Kids and adults who partner to collaborate in teaching to and learning from each other Kids who work at creative tasks that mirror the innovation workforce An understanding that kids need to contribute to all economic levels, and with better distribution of effort than in the past
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  • The future that kids and adults co-create can provide the emerging knowledge/innovation economy a boost, greatly enhancing human capital and potentials. How would you teach, learn, and create in Education 3.0? ShareThis
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    The future that kids and adults co-create can provide the emerging knowledge/innovation economy a boost, greatly enhancing human capital and potentials. How would you teach, learn, and create in Education 3.0?
Sheri Edwards

Education Week: Ending the Battles Over Teaching - 0 views

  • Researchers and policy wonks need to end the bickering and listen carefully to these young professionals eager to make change. If we don’t listen, many of them will leave teaching for other careers where they will have greater potential to grow, contribute, collaborate, and lead.
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    listen carefully to these young professionals eager to make change. If we don't listen, many of them will leave teaching for other careers where they will have greater potential to grow, contribute, collaborate, and lead.
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    The future of education led by young professionals
Lyn Hilt

50 Ways to Use Wikis for a More Collaborative and Interactive Classroom | Smart Teaching - 18 views

  • 50 Ways to Use Wikis for a More Collaborative and Interactive Classroom
  • Assign portfolio pages to each of your students, and allow them to display and discuss their work.
    • Geri Coats
       
      COATS maintain student work online. collab, share with parents, colleagues, admin
  • Create a calendar on the wiki and encourage students to add their own personally important dates.
    • Geri Coats
       
      COATS can I add a widget for google cal?
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  • Encourage students to draft rules and policies for the classroom
    • Geri Coats
       
      COATS great idea for start of next year!
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    Wikis are an exceptionally useful tool for getting students more involved in curriculum. They're often appealing and fun for students to use, while at the same time ideal for encouraging participation, collaboration, and interaction. Using these ideas, your students can collaboratively create classroom valuables.
anonymous

PBL The 21st Century Teaching Method - 0 views

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    Project Based Learning or what is referred to as PBL is a great instructional method . It is considered as the teaching method of the 21st century. As educators , we do need to know what it is all about and how we can impliemnt it in our teaching to better meet the 21st century educational goals such as crticial thinking, teaching , communication and creativity. check out PBL The 21st Century teaching Method to learn more.
Tero Toivanen

Some Folks Flip for the "Flipped" Classroom | CITES Academic Technology Services - 21 views

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    "The flipped classroom model inverts, or "flips" teaching methods by switching activities traditionally done at home with those done in class. Lectures, in the form of several short videos, happen at home where students watch prerecorded lessons online. Homework is done in class where teachers and students engage in a variety of active, and collaborative learning activities. Increased student access to technology, cheaper recording methods, and an increasing demand for open content have paved the way for Khan Academy and other online instructional repositories to move teaching out of the classroom and into the home."
Kathleen N

ideal conference home page - 0 views

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    Meet, collaborate, conduct seminars, conduct webinars, and teach courses over the Web, in a real time, fully accessible environment! IDEAL Conference® integrates data and voice within standard web browsers. This enables people to conduct meetings over the Internet from just about any computer with a network connection and a web browser. Empower your students (e-learning) and workforce (virtual) with online conferencing and collaboration services. Deliver dynamic and interactive presentations to your partners, vendors, and customers. It's easy to conduct an accessible online meeting-and it's just as easy to invite participants and demonstrate products.
Joseph Alvarado

TeachersPayTeachers.com - a marketplace for lesson plans and teaching resources - 0 views

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    An empowering place where teachers buy & sell original and used teaching materials and make teaching an even more rewarding experience
EdTechReview Community

How Do You Teach the 4Cs to Students (Part - 2) - Critical Thinking and Problem Solving! - 0 views

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    This is the second of the series of four articles about teaching the 4Cs to students. Learn how to teach critical thinking and problem solving.
Maggie Verster

Digital Storytelling Tools for Educators (eBook) (pdf) - 32 views

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    This guide was written especially for educators, who want to teach 21st century skills, such as collaborating, communicating, and connecting, through digital storytelling.
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    This guide was written especially for educators, who want to teach 21st century skills, such as collaborating, communicating, and connecting, through digital storytelling.
Amanda Marrinan

From Knowledgable to Knowledge-able: Learning in New Media Environments | Academic Commons - 0 views

  • ess important for students to know, memorize, or recall information
  • more important
  • to find, sort, analyze, share, discuss, critique, and create information
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  • move from being simply knowledgeable to being knowledge-able
  • “information revolution”
  • new ways of relating
  • discourse,
  • social revolution, not a technological one
  • new forms of
  • Wikis, blogs, tagging, social networking
  • nspired by a spirit of interactivity, participation, and collaboration.
  • important
  • “spirit” of Web 2.0
  • new ways of interacting, new kinds of groups, and new ways of sharing, trading, and collaborating.
  • technology is secondary.
  • empowers us to rethink education and the teacher-student relationship
  • dea of learning as acquiring information is no longer a message we can afford to send to our students, and that we need to start redesigning our learning environments to address, leverage, and harness the new media environment now permeating our classrooms.
  • first address why, facilitate how, and let the what generate naturally from there.
  • mportance of the form of learning over the content of learning
  • teaching subjects but subjectivities: ways of approaching, understanding, and interacting with the world.
  • We can't “teach” them. We can only create environments in which the practices and perspectives are nourished, encouraged, or inspired (and therefore continually practiced).
    • Amanda Marrinan
       
      Einstein - I don't each my pupils. I just create the environment in which they can learn
  • love and respect your students and they will love and respect you back. With the underlying feeling of trust and respect this provides, students quickly realize the importance of their role as co-creators of the learning environment and they begin to take responsibility for their own education.
  • The new media environment provides new opportunities for us to create a community of learners with our students seeking important and meaningful questions. Questions of the very best kind abound, and we become students again, pursuing questions we might have never imagined, joyfully learning right along with the others. In the best case scenario the students will leave the course, not with answers, but with more questions, and even more importantly, the capacity to ask still more questions generated from their continual pursuit and practice of the subjectivities we hope to inspire. This is what I have called elsewhere, “anti-teaching,” in which the focus is not on providing answers to be memorized, but on creating a learning environment more conducive to producing the types of questions that ask students to challenge their taken-for-granted assumptions and see their own underlying biases. The beauty of the current moment is that new media has thrown all of us as educators into just this kind of question-asking, bias-busting, assumption-exposing environment. There are no easy answers, but we can at least be thankful for the questions that drive us on.
David Wetzel

Why Use Web 20 Tools when Teaching Science or Math? - 0 views

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    The following is a common question heard around teacher workrooms, teacher lunchrooms, faculty meetings, and science or math conferences. "Why use web 2.0 tools when teaching science or math?" The answer is both simple and complex at the same time.
Nigel Coutts

Change and why we all see it differently - The Learner's Way - 3 views

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     If the young people of today are to thrive beyond the walls of the classroom they will need to be able to cope with a world characterised by volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity. The children of todays Kindergarten will enter the workplace in the fourth-decade of the 21st Century. We debate the merits of teaching 21st Century Skills and what they might be while teaching children who have lived their entire lives in that very century. The challenge is how will schools and individual teachers respond to this drive for urgent change.
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