Skip to main content

Home/ Classroom 2.0/ Group items matching "blog e-learning" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Carlos Quintero

Innovate: Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software - 0 views

  • Web 2.0 has inspired intense and growing interest, particularly as wikis, weblogs (blogs), really simple syndication (RSS) feeds, social networking sites, tag-based folksonomies, and peer-to-peer media-sharing applications have gained traction in all sectors of the education industry (Allen 2004; Alexander 2006)
  • Web 2.0 allows customization, personalization, and rich opportunities for networking and collaboration, all of which offer considerable potential for addressing the needs of today's diverse student body (Bryant 2006).
  • In contrast to earlier e-learning approaches that simply replicated traditional models, the Web 2.0 movement with its associated array of social software tools offers opportunities to move away from the last century's highly centralized, industrial model of learning and toward individual learner empowerment through designs that focus on collaborative, networked interaction (Rogers et al. 2007; Sims 2006; Sheely 2006)
  • ...19 more annotations...
  • learning management systems (Exhibit 1).
  • The reality, however, is that today's students demand greater control of their own learning and the inclusion of technologies in ways that meet their needs and preferences (Prensky 2005)
  • Tools like blogs, wikis, media-sharing applications, and social networking sites can support and encourage informal conversation, dialogue, collaborative content generation, and knowledge sharing, giving learners access to a wide range of ideas and representations. Used appropriately, they promise to make truly learner-centered education a reality by promoting learner agency, autonomy, and engagement in social networks that straddle multiple real and virtual communities by reaching across physical, geographic, institutional, and organizational boundaries.
  • "I have always imagined the information space as something to which everyone has immediate and intuitive access, and not just to browse, but to create” (2000, 216). Social software tools make it easy to contribute ideas and content, placing the power of media creation and distribution into the hands of "the people formerly known as the audience" (Rosen 2006).
  • the most promising settings for a pedagogy that capitalizes on the capabilities of these tools are fully online or blended so that students can engage with peers, instructors, and the community in creating and sharing ideas. In this model, some learners engage in creative authorship, producing and manipulating digital images and video clips, tagging them with chosen keywords, and making this content available to peers worldwide through Flickr, MySpace, and YouTube
  • Student-centered tasks designed by constructivist teachers reach toward this ideal, but they too often lack the dimension of real-world interactivity and community engagement that social software can contribute.
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of teaching and learning (Exhibit 2).
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of teaching and learning
  • Pedagogy 2.0 is defined by: Content: Microunits that augment thinking and cognition by offering diverse perspectives and representations to learners and learner-generated resources that accrue from students creating, sharing, and revising ideas; Curriculum: Syllabi that are not fixed but dynamic, open to negotiation and learner input, consisting of bite-sized modules that are interdisciplinary in focus and that blend formal and informal learning;Communication: Open, peer-to-peer, multifaceted communication using multiple media types to achieve relevance and clarity;Process: Situated, reflective, integrated thinking processes that are iterative, dynamic, and performance and inquiry based;Resources: Multiple informal and formal sources that are rich in media and global in reach;Scaffolds: Support for students from a network of peers, teachers, experts, and communities; andLearning tasks: Authentic, personalized, learner-driven and learner-designed, experiential tasks that enable learners to create content.
  • Instructors implementing Pedagogy 2.0 principles will need to work collaboratively with learners to review, edit, and apply quality assurance mechanisms to student work while also drawing on input from the wider community outside the classroom or institution (making use of the "wisdom of crowds” [Surowiecki 2004]).
  • A small portion of student performance content—if it is new knowledge—will be useful to keep. Most of the student performance content will be generated, then used, and will become stored in places that will never again see the light of day. Yet . . . it is still important to understand that the role of this student content in learning is critical.
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts. In so doing, learners generate their own personal rules and knowledge structures, using them to make sense of their experiences and refining them through interaction and dialogue with others.
  • Other divides are evident. For example, the social networking site Facebook is now the most heavily trafficked Web site in the United States with over 8 million university students connected across academic communities and institutions worldwide. The majority of Facebook participants are students, and teachers may not feel welcome in these communities. Moreover, recent research has shown that many students perceive teaching staff who use Facebook as lacking credibility as they may present different self-images online than they do in face-to-face situations (Mazer, Murphy, and Simonds 2007). Further, students may perceive instructors' attempts to coopt such social technologies for educational purposes as intrusions into their space. Innovative teachers who wish to adopt social software tools must do so with these attitudes in mind.
  • "students want to be able to take content from other people. They want to mix it, in new creative ways—to produce it, to publish it, and to distribute it"
  • Furthermore, although the advent of Web 2.0 and the open-content movement significantly increase the volume of information available to students, many higher education students lack the competencies necessary to navigate and use the overabundance of information available, including the skills required to locate quality sources and assess them for objectivity, reliability, and currency
  • In combination with appropriate learning strategies, Pedagogy 2.0 can assist students in developing such critical thinking and metacognitive skills (Sener 2007; McLoughlin, Lee, and Chan 2006).
  • We envision that social technologies coupled with a paradigm of learning focused on knowledge creation and community participation offer the potential for radical and transformational shifts in teaching and learning practices, allowing learners to access peers, experts, and the wider community in ways that enable reflective, self-directed learning.
  • . By capitalizing on personalization, participation, and content creation, existing and future Pedagogy 2.0 practices can result in educational experiences that are productive, engaging, and community based and that extend the learning landscape far beyond the boundaries of classrooms and educational institutions.
  •  
    About pedagogic 2.0
  •  
    Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software Catherine McLoughlin and Mark J. W. Lee
Syed Amjad Ali

Why E-Learning - A simple analysis - 0 views

  •  
    E-Learning industry is witnessing tremendous growth in terms of revenue and application. It has become a synonym for many of the learning requirements in corporates, academics and government institutions. To provide most suitable learning solutions, industry experts exploring and inventing creative methods and approaches such as Custom Learning Solutions, Rapid Learning Solutions, Gamifications, Instructor Led Training programs and blend of these methods and approaches.
Syed Amjad Ali

E-Learning Course Development Standards - 0 views

A few important concepts to be considered by Learning Manager to understand their learning needs and assess e-learning vendor who can fulfill them. http://www.elearningserv.com/e-learning/e-learning-cour...

e-learning Content elearning course Development Training

started by Syed Amjad Ali on 13 Nov 14 no follow-up yet
Syed Amjad Ali

E-Templates - A new approach in Rapid E-Learning Course Development - 0 views

  •  
    Advanced eLearning Authoring Tools have made eLearning Development Easy The rapid and extensive advances in technology have brought on incredible innovation in all fields of human interest. The impact of the same can be seen in the e-learning space, and these days, this specialized segment is breaking new ground continuously.
Kerry J

E-learning Insights » Copyright and Creative Commons: Episode 22 (E-learning Insights) - 1 views

  •  
    As learning moves online and educators and learners look to use and share materials, there are issues regarding copyright and educational exemptions that both groups need to consider. What is legal to use in a classroom often is not legal to make available to the wider internet, despite an educational use or context. If you want to share something you've created as an educator - you might not be able to do so legally. Creative Commons, an international movement to create licenses that allow creators to freely share their works online, is one way of lessening the confusion. MCEETYA (the Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs) and Creative Commons Australia are teaming up to help educators thread their way through the maze - so they can advise learners and model best practice. In this episode, we talk with Delia Browne, National Copyright Director for MCEETYA and Jessica Coates, Project Manager, Creative Commons Clinic, Queensland University of Technology.
Timeless Learntech

E Learning: Transitional Trend in Educational Pattern in India - 0 views

  •  
    "Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself. Learning does not cease, its timeless and forever!" Traditional teaching has been part of formal education over years, where in students assemble together in classrooms and learn. With the advent of technology, the skills and methods of approach towards learning are changing.
Syed Amjad Ali

E-Learning and Blended Learning - 0 views

  •  
    It is difficult to find one simple solutions for a complex issues. The expectations with regards to performance at work place or at home are complex; we need a blend of various learning solutions to resolve these complex issues. In such a scenario, Blended learning offers a greater chance of success.
Tero Toivanen

Top 100 Learning Game Resources | Upside Learning Blog - 0 views

  •  
    So here they are - a Top 100 Learning Game Resource list.
Dennis OConnor

The Fischbowl: Is It Okay To Be A Technologically Illiterate Teacher? - 1 views

  • Here is my list:1. All educators must achieve a basic level of technological capability.2. People who do not meet the criterion of #1 should be embarrassed, not proud, to say so in public.3. We should finally drop the myth of digital natives and digital immigrants. Back in July 2006 I said in my blog, in the context of issuing guidance to parents about e-safety:"I'm sorry, but I don't go for all this digital natives and immigrants stuff when it comes to this: I don't know anything about the internal combustion engine, but I know it's pretty dangerous to wander about on the road, so I've learnt to handle myself safely when I need to get from one side of the road to the other."
  • 4. Headteachers and Principals who have staff who are technologically-illiterate should be held to account.5. School inspectors who are technologically illiterate should be encouraged to find alternative employment.6. Schools, Universities and Teacher training courses who turn out students who are technologically illiterate should have their right to a licence and/or funding questioned.7. We should stop being so nice. After all, we've got our qualifications and jobs, and we don't have the moral right to sit placidly on the sidelines whilst some educators are potentially jeopardising the chances of our youngsters.
  • If a teacher today is not technologically literate - and is unwilling to make the effort to learn more - it's equivalent to a teacher 30 years ago who didn't know how to read and write. Extreme? Maybe. Your thoughts?
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • Keep in mind that was written after a particularly frustrating day. I’ve gone back and forth on this issue myself. At times completely agreeing with Terry (and myself above), and at other times stepping back and saying that there’s so much on teacher’s plates that it’s unrealistic to expect them to take this on as quickly as I’d like them to. But then I think of our students, and the fact that they don't much care how much is on our plates. As I've said before, this is the only four years these students will have at our high school - they can't wait for us to figure it out.
  • In order to teach it, we have to do it. How can we teach this to kids, how can we model it, if we aren’t literate ourselves? You need to experience this, you need to explore right along with your students. You need to experience the tools they’ll be using in the 21st century, developing your own networks in parallel with your students. You need to demonstrate continual learning, lifelong learning – for your students, or you will continue to teach your students how to be successful in an age that no longer exists
  • If a teacher today is not technologically literate - and is unwilling to make the effort to learn more - it's equivalent to a teacher 30 years ago who didn't know how to read and write.
  •  
    I read this post several years ago and it got my blood moving. The author, Karl Fisch lays it on the line. This post was voted the most influential ed-blog post of 2007. It's 2009 already and still a very relevant piece of work. A must read! (Let me add, that if you're reading this bookmark... you're at the front of the line and obviously working to understand and live in the 21st Century!)
Fabian Aguilar

The End in Mind » An Open (Institutional) Learning Network - 1 views

  • There are components of an open learning network that can and should live in the cloud: Personal publishing tools (blogs, personal websites, wikis) Social networking apps Open content Student generated content
  • Some tools might straddle the boundary between the institution and the cloud, e.g. portfolios, collaboration tools and websites with course & learning activity content.
  • Other tools and data belong squarely within the university network: Student Information Systems Secure assessment tools (e.g., online quiz & test applications) Institutional gradebook (for secure communication about scores, grades & feedback) Licensed and or proprietary institutional content
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • To facilitate the relationships between students and teachers, students and students, and students and content, universities need to provide students the ability to input additional information about themselves into the institutional repository, such as: URLs & RSS feeds for anything and everything the student wants to share with the learning community Social networking usernames (probably on an opt-in basis) Portfolio URLs (particularly to simplify program assessment activities) Assignment & artifact links (provided and used most frequently via the gradebook interface)
  • Integrating these technologies assumes: Web services compatibility to exchange data between systems and easily redisplay content as is or mashed-up via alternate interfaces RSS everywhere to aggregate content in a variety of places
  • While there’s still a lot of work to do, this feels like we’re getting closer to something real and doable. Thoughts?
Caroline Roche

learning * ingenuity * research * policy * design * technology * delight * (+ sailing!) - 1 views

  •  
    Greg Black, CEO of Education.au mentioned this blog in his report from the Learning and Technology World Forum GENIE meeting.
  •  
    Stephen Heppell is a wonderfully inspiring educator. If you ar e interested in making Web 2.0 work in your classrooms, and in 'thinking outside the box', then look at thesese ideas, especially the 'Be Very Afraid' videos on Heppell TV
Paul Beaufait

The Overselling of Ed Tech - Alfie Kohn - 7 views

  •  
    ""[W]e shouldn't confuse personalized learning with personal learning. The first involves adjusting the difficulty level of prefabricated skills-based exercises based on students' test scores, and it requires the purchase of software. The second involves working with each student to create projects of intellectual discovery that reflect his or her unique needs and interests, and it requires the presence of a caring teacher who knows each child well" (Kohn, 2016.03.12, ¶9).
Timeless Learntech

Equipped for Online Learning? - 0 views

  •  
    Online Learning Shapes the Academic World Developments in Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) have impacted all sectors of society- mainly the corporate organisations as well as the education sector. In higher education, application of ICTs in form of e-learning is already changing teaching and learning processes.
Rudy Garns

Rapid E-learning, E-learnings, LMSes, and more - 0 views

  •  
    Hallo guys. I am very happy to share here. This is my site. If you would like to visit here. Go ahead. I've made ​​About a $ 58,000 from my little site. There is a forum and I was very happy to announce to you. I also provide seo service. www.killdo.de.gg www.gratisdatingsite.nl/ gratis datingsite datingsites www.nr1gratisdating.nl/‎ gratis datingsite gratis dating
1 - 20 of 62 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page