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About Startl | Startl - 30 views

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    About Startl Accelerating the process of innovation. Changing the future of learning To realize the promise of learner-centered education, we must create pathways by which sound, innovative, technology-based products and services can evolve, mature and get to market at lower costs. Startl™ is a new social enterprise dedicated to supporting the innovation of effective, affordable, and accessible learning products. Startl's focus is creating the conditions for success that let innovators create and capitalize products that truly help learners learn."
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Education Futures - The role of teachers in Education 3.0 - 0 views

  • Download-style education fails when we try to provide students with knowledge and skills that will enable them to lead in a future that is very different from what exists today –and, in a future that defies human imagination.
  • Teaching in Education 3.0 requires a new form of co-constructivism that provides meaningful extensions to Dewey, Vygotsky and Freire, while building the future.
  • Specifically, teaching in Education 3.0 necessitates a Leapfrog approach with: Adults who are eager to imagine, create and innovate with kids Kids and adults who want to learn more about each other Kids and adults who partner to collaborate in teaching to and learning from each other Kids who work at creative tasks that mirror the innovation workforce An understanding that kids need to contribute to all economic levels, and with better distribution of effort than in the past
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  • The future that kids and adults co-create can provide the emerging knowledge/innovation economy a boost, greatly enhancing human capital and potentials. How would you teach, learn, and create in Education 3.0? ShareThis
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    The future that kids and adults co-create can provide the emerging knowledge/innovation economy a boost, greatly enhancing human capital and potentials. How would you teach, learn, and create in Education 3.0?
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Project Tomorrow - 1 views

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    Project Tomorrow is a national, education nonprofit organization. Our vision is to insure that today's students are well prepared to be tomorrow's innovators, leaders and engaged citizens of the world. We believe that by supporting the innovative uses of science, math and technology innovative in our K-12 schools and communities, students will develop the critical thinking, problem solving and creativity skills needed to compete and thrive in the 21st century
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Innovative Teachers Network - 0 views

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    Welcome! We are a global community of educators who value innovative uses of information and communication technology to enhance teaching and learning experiences.
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Online University Reviews : 100 Most Inspiring and Innovative Blogs for Educators - 2 views

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    "Whether you work at elementary schools or online colleges, you will find that being a teacher is a difficult and often thankless job. Between lesson plans, unengaged students, and new emerging technologies, teachers need help now more than ever. Luckily, there are a few resources out there for educators looking for tips, empathy, and inspiration. Blogs are a great way for teachers to connect with other great teachers around the world, find advice and inspiration, and learn new, cutting-edge teaching strategies. By visiting the 100 blogs below, you will find answers to all of your questions, as well as valuable teaching resources."
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Innovate: Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software - 0 views

  • Web 2.0 has inspired intense and growing interest, particularly as wikis, weblogs (blogs), really simple syndication (RSS) feeds, social networking sites, tag-based folksonomies, and peer-to-peer media-sharing applications have gained traction in all sectors of the education industry (Allen 2004; Alexander 2006)
  • Web 2.0 allows customization, personalization, and rich opportunities for networking and collaboration, all of which offer considerable potential for addressing the needs of today's diverse student body (Bryant 2006).
  • In contrast to earlier e-learning approaches that simply replicated traditional models, the Web 2.0 movement with its associated array of social software tools offers opportunities to move away from the last century's highly centralized, industrial model of learning and toward individual learner empowerment through designs that focus on collaborative, networked interaction (Rogers et al. 2007; Sims 2006; Sheely 2006)
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  • learning management systems (Exhibit 1).
  • The reality, however, is that today's students demand greater control of their own learning and the inclusion of technologies in ways that meet their needs and preferences (Prensky 2005)
  • Tools like blogs, wikis, media-sharing applications, and social networking sites can support and encourage informal conversation, dialogue, collaborative content generation, and knowledge sharing, giving learners access to a wide range of ideas and representations. Used appropriately, they promise to make truly learner-centered education a reality by promoting learner agency, autonomy, and engagement in social networks that straddle multiple real and virtual communities by reaching across physical, geographic, institutional, and organizational boundaries.
  • "I have always imagined the information space as something to which everyone has immediate and intuitive access, and not just to browse, but to create” (2000, 216). Social software tools make it easy to contribute ideas and content, placing the power of media creation and distribution into the hands of "the people formerly known as the audience" (Rosen 2006).
  • the most promising settings for a pedagogy that capitalizes on the capabilities of these tools are fully online or blended so that students can engage with peers, instructors, and the community in creating and sharing ideas. In this model, some learners engage in creative authorship, producing and manipulating digital images and video clips, tagging them with chosen keywords, and making this content available to peers worldwide through Flickr, MySpace, and YouTube
  • Student-centered tasks designed by constructivist teachers reach toward this ideal, but they too often lack the dimension of real-world interactivity and community engagement that social software can contribute.
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of teaching and learning (Exhibit 2).
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of teaching and learning
  • Pedagogy 2.0 is defined by: Content: Microunits that augment thinking and cognition by offering diverse perspectives and representations to learners and learner-generated resources that accrue from students creating, sharing, and revising ideas; Curriculum: Syllabi that are not fixed but dynamic, open to negotiation and learner input, consisting of bite-sized modules that are interdisciplinary in focus and that blend formal and informal learning;Communication: Open, peer-to-peer, multifaceted communication using multiple media types to achieve relevance and clarity;Process: Situated, reflective, integrated thinking processes that are iterative, dynamic, and performance and inquiry based;resources: Multiple informal and formal sources that are rich in media and global in reach;Scaffolds: Support for students from a network of peers, teachers, experts, and communities; andLearning tasks: Authentic, personalized, learner-driven and learner-designed, experiential tasks that enable learners to create content.
  • Instructors implementing Pedagogy 2.0 principles will need to work collaboratively with learners to review, edit, and apply quality assurance mechanisms to student work while also drawing on input from the wider community outside the classroom or institution (making use of the "wisdom of crowds” [Surowiecki 2004]).
  • A small portion of student performance content—if it is new knowledge—will be useful to keep. Most of the student performance content will be generated, then used, and will become stored in places that will never again see the light of day. Yet . . . it is still important to understand that the role of this student content in learning is critical.
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts. In so doing, learners generate their own personal rules and knowledge structures, using them to make sense of their experiences and refining them through interaction and dialogue with others.
  • Other divides are evident. For example, the social networking site Facebook is now the most heavily trafficked Web site in the United States with over 8 million university students connected across academic communities and institutions worldwide. The majority of Facebook participants are students, and teachers may not feel welcome in these communities. Moreover, recent research has shown that many students perceive teaching staff who use Facebook as lacking credibility as they may present different self-images online than they do in face-to-face situations (Mazer, Murphy, and Simonds 2007). Further, students may perceive instructors' attempts to coopt such social technologies for educational purposes as intrusions into their space. Innovative teachers who wish to adopt social software tools must do so with these attitudes in mind.
  • "students want to be able to take content from other people. They want to mix it, in new creative ways—to produce it, to publish it, and to distribute it"
  • Furthermore, although the advent of Web 2.0 and the open-content movement significantly increase the volume of information available to students, many higher education students lack the competencies necessary to navigate and use the overabundance of information available, including the skills required to locate quality sources and assess them for objectivity, reliability, and currency
  • In combination with appropriate learning strategies, Pedagogy 2.0 can assist students in developing such critical thinking and metacognitive skills (Sener 2007; McLoughlin, Lee, and Chan 2006).
  • We envision that social technologies coupled with a paradigm of learning focused on knowledge creation and community participation offer the potential for radical and transformational shifts in teaching and learning practices, allowing learners to access peers, experts, and the wider community in ways that enable reflective, self-directed learning.
  • . By capitalizing on personalization, participation, and content creation, existing and future Pedagogy 2.0 practices can result in educational experiences that are productive, engaging, and community based and that extend the learning landscape far beyond the boundaries of classrooms and educational institutions.
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    About pedagogic 2.0
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    Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software Catherine McLoughlin and Mark J. W. Lee
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THE DAILY RIFF: Learning, Innovation & Tech Archives - Be Smarter. About Education. - 0 views

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    A great journal full of interesting articles about education.
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ThingLink Toollkit of Resources for Teachers and Students - 0 views

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    A toolkit  designed to provide innovative ideas and support for using interactive graphics for teaching and learning.
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E-learning - A new trend in education sector | Takshilalearning - 0 views

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    E-learning is an innovative and influencing way in education sector to impart knowledge. From school courses to higher education, entrance exams to professional courses, e-learning has become a successful alternative to monotonous black and white classroom program. With the help of electronic innovative, E-learning reshape teaching methodology. Computers and the Internet are the major components of E-learning.
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Patronage For Teachers - 0 views

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    "Schools achieve amazing things everyday, especially when educators and students have the right resources and experience. However, with funding at chronically low levels in many education systems around the world, schools are looking for resources ways to invest more funds into the classroom, beyond simply asking parents to make up the shortfall.  The idea of patronage for scholars and artisans by philanthropists is nothing new and has its roots in the ancient past."
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CK12.ORG - FlexBooks - 41 views

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    "About CK-12 Foundation Traditional textbooks are both expensive and rigid. FlexBooks conform to national and state textbook standards. They are free, easy to update and easy to customize. With FlexBooks, you can customize your textbooks to support your innovative work in the classroom. The CK-12 Foundation provides FlexBooks free to anyone who wants to use them."
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All About Computers - Discovery Education - 0 views

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    lesson plans for 21st Century skills: critical thinking, communication & collaboration, creativity & innovation, and digital citizenship
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Leapfrog Institutes » Blog Archive » Leapfrogging to the New Basics - 0 views

  • This means that youth will produce new thought tools to help them cope with increasing chaos and ambiguity in the modern world.
  • This means that youth will counter the tyranny of traditional perceptions of clock time through their personal time constructs, including conceptualizations of history, the present and future that can be strategically compressed and stretched.
  • This means that youth gravitate toward the acquisition of new information, rather than shying away from it; and that the abundance of information will be valued as a socioeconomic resource.
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  • This means that youth will devote their lives to the construction and application of meaning, both explicit and implicit.
  • This means that youth will become increasingly capable as designers and architects of alternative knowledge foundations to improve their lives.
  • This means that youth will not only enjoy learning from their mistakes, but also aim to turn mistakes into successes.
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    Are the old basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic relevant in the 21st century? Or, is it time for an upgrade? Arthur Harkins and John Moravec assembled a list of New Basics for education that can help us leapfrog to an education paradigm that is both innovative and relevant for the 21st century and beyond.
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ThingLinkToolkit - 0 views

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    A Toolkit  designed to provide innovative ideas and support for using interactive graphics for teaching and learning.
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Research - 17 views

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    "Footsteps2Brilliance, Inc.™'s Academic Language Program for Students (ALPS) delivers a robust library of stimulating ebooks and educational games to parents, children and teachers anywhere/anytime through innovative mobile gaming technology. Developed by educational experts usingthe latest research on cognitive development, ALPS provides young learners with 1,000 essential vocabulary words through interactive eBooks that are sure to engage today's digital students whether at school or home."
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Online Education Integrated Learning Platform: New Online Learning Platform launched by... - 0 views

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    Ravensbourne e-learning provider as a number one specialist in online learning of innovative media and digital technology courses
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Framework for 21st Century Learning - The Partnership for 21st Century Skills - 36 views

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    "The Framework presents a holistic view of 21st century teaching and learning that combines a discrete focus on 21st century student outcomes (a blending of specific skills, content knowledge, expertise and literacies) with innovative support systems to help students master the multi-dimensional abilities required of them in the 21st century" (¶1).
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