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Tero Toivanen

Cognitive Extension and the Web - ECS EPrints Repository - 0 views

  • Web resources and technologies are apt for potent forms of cognitive extension and incorporation, we may fully expect such resources and technologies to fundamentally transfigure the space of human thought and reason.
  • Our analysis suggests that the Web is capable of participating in the external realization of (at least some) human mental states, but that further work is required to leverage its full potential.
  • We conclude that the Web does constitute a potentially important element of the bio-technological matrix associated with mind and cognition; however, we suggest that further technological innovation is required to enable it to participate in the external realization of human mental states and processes.
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  • continued study of the psycho-cognitive effects of the Web should, we argue, be key elements of a mature web science discipline.
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    Cognitive Extension and the Web Smart, P. R., Engelbrecht, P. C., Braines, D., Strub, M. and Hendler, J. A. (2009) Cognitive Extension and the Web. In: Web Science Conference: Society On-Line, 18th-20th March 2009, Athens, Greece.
Judy Robison

SAS® Curriculum Pathways® | Overview - 2 views

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    SAS® Curriculum Pathways® provides innovative, web-based innovative in the core disciplines, for grades 8-14. Topics are mapped to state and national standards.
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    Fully funded by SAS and offered at no cost to US educators and students, SAS Curriculum Pathways is designed to enhance student achievement and teacher effectiveness by providing Web-based curriculum resources in all the core disciplines: English, math, science, social studies/history and Spanish, to educators and students in grades 8-14 in virtual schools, home schools, high schools and community colleges.
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    SAS Curriculum Pathways, which is used by thousands of teachers in more than 30 states, is now available for free to every educator in America. SAS Curriculum Pathways provides content in the core disciplines of English, mathematics, social studies, science and Spanish. Aligned with state standards, it has more than 200 InterActivities and 855 ready-to-use lessons that enable technology-rich instruction and engage higher-order thinking skills. It is primarily for use in grades 8-12, though middle school content is in development.
Vahid Masrour

About the book | Invent To Learn - 19 views

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    a book to help teachers feel comfortable with invention inside the classroom, and using invention as a resource for learning.
David Hilton

History Teachers Group - 19 views

Hi. We've got a group for history teachers, students and enthusiasts to share resources, bookmarks and ideas with each other. The focus is on helping history teachers and students share good-qualit...

started by David Hilton on 06 Jul 09 no follow-up yet
Tero Toivanen

Study on the Effective Use of Social Software by UK FE & HE to Support Student Learning & Engagement : JISC - 0 views

  • This study provides insights about
  • educational goals of using social software tools; enablers or drivers within the institution, or from external sources which positively influence the adoption of social software; benefits to the students, educators and institutions; challenges that may influence a social software initiative; and issues that need to be considered in a social software initiative.
  • social software tools support a variety of ways of learning: sharing of resources (eg bookmarks, photographs), collaborative learning, problem-based and inquiry-based learning, reflective learning, and peer-to-peer learning.
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • The educator’s role is changing from being a provider of information to a facilitator or moderator
  • adjusting to a ‘new’ way of teaching.
  • The results highlight the different pedagogical roles of social software: communication, nurturing creativity and innovation, and collaborative learning.
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    Study on the Effective Use of Social Software by UK FE & HE to Support Student Learning & Engagement
J Black

The 21st Century Centurion: 21st Century Questions - 0 views

  • The report extended literacy to “Five New Basics” - English, mathematics, science, social studies, and computer science. A Nation At Risk specified that all high school graduates should be able to “understand the computer as an information, computation and communication device; students should be able to use the computer in the study of the other Basics and for personal and work-related purposes; and students should understand the world of computers, electronics, and related technologies."That was 1983 - twenty- six years ago. I ask you, Ben: Has education produced students with basic knowledge in the core disciplines and computer science TODAY? Are we there yet? OR - are we still at risk for not producing students with the essential skills for success in 1983?
    • J Black
       
      I had never really considered this before...how computer science has been totally left out of the equaltion....why is that? Cost of really delivering this would be enormous -- think how much money the districts would have to pour into the school systems.
  • On June 29, 1996, the U. S. Department of Education released Getting America's Students Ready for the 21st Century; Meeting the Technology Literacy Challenge, A Report to the Nation on Technology and Education. Recognizing the rapid changes in workplace needs and the vast challenges facing education, the Technology Literacy Challenge launched programs in the states that focused on a vision of the 21st century where all students are “technologically literate.” Four goals, relating primarily to technology skills, were advanced that focused specifically on: 1.) Training and support for teachers; 2.) Acquisition of multimedia computers in classrooms; 3.) Connection to the Internet for every classroom; and 4.) Acquiring effective software and online learning resources integral to teaching the school's curriculum.
    • J Black
       
      we are really stuck here....the training and support -- the acquisition of hardware, connectivity etc.
  • Our profession is failing miserably to respond to twenty-six years of policy, programs and even statutory requirements designed to improve the ability of students to perform and contribute in a high performance workplace. Our students are losing while we are debating.
    • J Black
       
      This is really, really well said here...bravo
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  • In 2007, The Report of the NEW Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce: Tough Choices or Tough Times made our nation hyperaware that "World market professionals are available in a wide range of fields for a fraction of what U.S. professionals charge." Guess what? While U.S. educators stuck learned heads in the sand, the world's citizens gained 21st century skills! Tough Choices spares no hard truth: "Our young adults score at “mediocre” levels on the best international measure of performance." Do you think it is an accident that the word "mediocre" is used? Let's see, I believe we saw it w-a-a-a-y back in 1983 when A Nation At Risk warned of a "tide of mediocrity." Tough Choices asks the hard question: "Will the world’s employers pick U.S. graduates when workers in Asia will work for much less? Then the question is answered. Our graduates will be chosen for global work "only if the U.S. worker can compete academically, exceed in creativity, learn quickly, and demonstrate a capacity to innovate." There they are
    • J Black
       
      This is exactly what dawns on students when they realize what globalization means for them..the incredibly stiff competition that it is posed to bring about.
  • “Learning is what most adults will do for a living in the 21st century."
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    The report extended literacy to "Five New Basics" - English, mathematics, science, social studies, and computer science. A Nation At Risk specified that all high school graduates should be able to "understand the computer as an information, computation and communication device; students should be able to use the computer in the study of the other Basics and for personal and work-related purposes; and students should understand the world of computers, electronics, and related technologies." That was 1983 - twenty- six years ago. I ask you, Ben: Has education produced students with basic knowledge in the core disciplines and computer science TODAY? Are we there yet? OR - are we still at risk for not producing students with the essential skills for success in 1983?
Ruth Howard

Welcome to BetterLesson - 1 views

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    (Beta) BetterLesson is a free organizational tool and curriculum development community that helps educators connect and share high-quality resources, best practices, and ideas. Use BetterLesson to: * Organize and share your complete, 180-day curriculum * Connect and collaborate with resources educators in your field * Tag and search lessons using state standards * Access your files and instructional content from anywhere * Control who sees your curriculum
Joseph Alvarado

The Innovative Educator: Friending Students on Facebook - 0 views

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    This is a great post by a teacher who explains her reasons why more teachers should friend their students on facebook.
Clay Leben

Edsurge - news and reviews of edtech - 0 views

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    News about edtech companies and products and education trends.
Eric Patnoudes

Reform Education, Change the World - 0 views

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    Ideas for progress toward reforming public education, innovative uses of technology in the classroom and making school an authentic and meaningful experience.
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