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Yuly Asencion

Action research Toolkit | British Council - English Online - 0 views

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    Action research resources
Nigel Coutts

Realising the benefits of reflective practice - The Learner's Way - 4 views

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    It is generally accepted that learning is enhanced by the inclusion of deliberate, reflective practice. Indeed the act of reflecting on the impact that our actions have towards the achievement of any goal (learning oriented or other) is shown to have a positive impact. Reflective practice is defined as the praxis (interdependent and integrated theory, practice, research, thought and action) of individuals or groups to move from 'better thinking to better action' as a result of reflection for, in and on learning (Harvey et al. 2010 p140). With this in mind, it is worth considering what reflective practice might look like and to consider it in a range of contemporary contexts. 
Wendy Windust

WIDE World - Program Overview - 14 views

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    Our goal is to transform school systems by developing professional communities of teachers and school leaders with interactive online courses and on-site support programs that enable schools to cultivate the critical learning students need for the 21st century world. Research-Based. WIDE World professional development programs are based on Teaching for Understanding, a classroom-tested framework developed through research at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Online. WIDE World courses are conducted online and are asynchronous. This allows for flexible, adaptive, and convenient learning for all participants, regardless of location or schedule. Job-embedded. Through our courses, WIDE World learners integrate research-based strategies in their own workplace. Online coaches support cycles of learning, applying, and reflecting as teams of educators improve lesson plans, instruction, and data-driven action projects. Team-Based with Coaching. Systemic change requires coordinated effort from all stakeholders. Expert coaches help teachers, leaders, and specialists work in teams to develop a common language for defining and achieving shared goals. Tailored for Local Impact. WIDE World works with you to design professional development programs adapted precisely to address the needs of your school, program, district, or system and build local capacity for continuous improvement. Global Learning. In the online environment, participants collaborate with innovative educators from across the US and around the globe.
Rick Beach

Research Findings Released: Engaging Youth in Social Media - Is Facebook the New Media Frontier? - The NewsCloud Blog - 0 views

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    research on the value of a social networking environmental-action tool on Facebook on civic engagement
anonymous

Mobile Learning for Development | Online and Distance Learning - 0 views

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    This book integrates research, action research, best practice and case studies detailing how some educators have embraced the opportunities afforded by mobile learning. In particular, it brings together a range of scenarios, solutions and discussions relating to mobile learning in development and other resource challenged contexts.
Fatima Anwar

The Integrated Learning Platform: Cardiff Univeristy - Cardiff is everything a good university should be - 0 views

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    Cardiff University is recognized in independent government tests as one of The British leading educating and analysis colleges. Established by Royal Charter in 1883, the University today brings together impressive modern facilities and a powerful approach to educating and analysis with its proud culture of service and accomplishment. Cardiff University is the biggest University of mature education and learning in Wales, with the Cardiff Center for Long term Studying offering several hundred programs in locations across Southern Eastern Wales. The University's lifelong learning actions also include the professional growth work performed by educational institutions for companies, and many of these is custom-made to match an individual business's needs. The Center also provides business terminology training at all levels. Founded: 1883. Structural features: Merged with University of Wales College of Medicine (UCWM) in 2004. Location: Close to Cardiff city center. Healthcare care learners also at hospital website, Heath Recreation area University, 1 mile away. Getting there: Cardiff Primary Place on the national train network; trainers to bus station (next to train station); M4 from London and M5 (west county and Midlands). For school, frequent teaches from Primary Place to Cathays station (on campus), regional vehicles from bus station (53, 79, 81 for main campus; 8 or 9 for hospital site). Academic features: 4-year incorporated food techniques, 5-year two-tier techniques in structure and town planning. 5-year medical and dental programs, plus foundation season for those without science backgrounds; medical teaching throughout Wales. Awarding body: Cardiff University; Wales University for some healthcare programs. Main undergrad awards: BA, BD, BDS, BMus, BN, BSc, BEng, BScEcon, LLB, BArch, MB BCh, MPhys, MChem, MEng, MPharm. Length of courses: 3 years; others 4 and 5 decades. Library & IT facilities: Integrated collection,
justquestionans

Ashford-University ECE 332 Homework and Assignment Help - 1 views

Get help for Ashford-University ECE 332 Homework and Assignment Help. We provide assignment, homework, discussions and case studies help for all subjects Ashford-University for Session 2017-2018. ...

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Anne Bubnic

CoSN Receives MacArthur Grant to Explore Policy and Leadership Barriers to Web 2.0 - 0 views

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    CoSN Receives MacArthur Grant: Exploring Policy and Leadership Barriers to Effective Use of Web 2.0 in Schools
    The $450,000 grant began July 1st and over the coming year CoSN will focus on the following key objectives:
    1.Identify findings from existing empirical research relevant to the use of new media in schools and the barriers to their adoption and scalability.
    2. Assess the awareness, understanding, and perspectives of U.S. educational leaders (superintendents, district curriculum and technology directors/CTOs) and policymaker's on the role, problems, and benefits of new media in schools within a participatory culture context.
    3. Investigate and document the organizational and policy issues that are critical obstacles for the effective deployment of new media.
    4. Develop a concise report of findings and construct an action plan for intervention.
Muslim Academy

TV programs arouses discontentment among the Muslims - 0 views

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    TV can prove to be a vital medium to spread any kind of word. This is what recently happened to a new TV program, which was recently launched in Britian. The program was basically meant to highlight the Islamic history. However things didn't go the way it was expected and a new controversy emerged. The controversy is that the Muslims feel , that words have been minced and misinterpreted regarding the Islamic history. All the guns are actually firing at the author of the program. The first to come into action was the Islamic Education and Research Academy. The academy was of the opinion, that Tom Holland had not taken into consideration the actual facts and realities of the Islamic history. These were actually the highlights of the Daily mail. This unlucky program was shown on Channel 4 , just last week. The program had the title "The untold story." The Muslims were shown to have dressed up in the style of Arabian Tribes. The person who was shown as the historian, had adopted the Indiana Jones attire. The author raised the point that our Holy Prophet (PBUH) had not started his tedious struggle of spreading Islam from Makkah. Another aspect, which the author mentioned was with referencing Islamic historical events with the Quran. The author raised a big question and that how prevalent Islam was during the time of Holy Prophet (PBUH)? Twitter was another medium where this park of anger was ignited. Twitter, Muslim users had a massive reaction towards the author of the program. Muslims condemned Holland at the same time of questioning Islam. 550 complaints were raised and were brought under the notice of Channel 4 and Ofcom. These news of arousal against British programs has become quite common. Another program, that came under immense criticism was "Citizen Khan ", which was again accused of misinterpreting Islam.
Tero Toivanen

Study: Young Children Explore as Scientists Do - Inside School Research - Education Week - 20 views

  • Alison Gopnik, a psychology professor at the University of California, Berkeley, reports that children from as young as 8 months old through preschool explore through techniques that would seem familiar to any scientist: they make hypotheses and test them against data; predict outcomes using statistics, and can infer the causes of failed actions.
  • All of these things, Gopnik and her colleagues argue, happen years before any formal training in the same scientific techniques. "What we need to do to encourage children to learn is not to put them in the equivalent of school, tell them things, give them reading drills or flash cards. We really need to put them in a safe, rich environment where the natural capacities for exploration, for testing, for science can get free rein," she said in a briefing with reporters.
Julianne Hoefer

SchoolsMovingUp - 0 views

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    Tips for ways to improve student achievement. Schools on the move identifies high performing schools and explains what actions they have taken to reach their levels of achievement.
Ihering Alcoforado

Trojan Horse or Adaptive Institutions? Some Reflections on Urban Commons in Australia * - Urban Policy and Research - 0 views

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    The rubric of 'new' commons signals the re-assessment of old dilemmas about resource management and collaborative action in new social, spatial and technological settings. Urban commons feature in the expanding register of new commons, but there has been little analysis of the meaning and application of the concept. This article explores the urban commons in an Australian context, focusing on the provision of social infrastructure. While noting criticism of the concept's imprecision and ideological valency, the article argues that the urban commons offers new perspectives on public resources, urban governance and sustainability.
Paul Beaufait

the lives of teachers » Blog Archive » the new chernobyl? - media literacy in action - 20 views

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    In light of recent human disasters in Japan, this post explores media literacy. It explains and illustrates how news media have changed, why and how media are conveying the content that they do, and how to evaluate information and opinions from a wide variety of readily available sources.
Roland Gesthuizen

Participation Inequality: Encouraging More Users to Contribute - 0 views

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    "In most online communities, 90% of users are lurkers who never contribute, 9% of users contribute a little, and 1% of users account for almost all the action."
Glenn Hoyle

Student Engagement and Web2.0: What's the connection? - 0 views

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    "What I want to demonstrate is that it works for a purpose-it engages us," said Dr. Vaughan. Using blogs, wikis, social networking systems, mash-ups and voice-over-Internet-protocol, in the class room, student engagement will be measured with a survey. The survey focuses on five points: how actively collaborative the learning is; the quality of interaction with instructors; is there a sense of challenge or rigor; is there a connection between the assigned task and a future purpose; and the larger campus environment of learning. Dr. Vaughan points to the Maclean's magazine engagement survey, which replaced their unpopular rankings of Canadian Universities, as a way of judging student learning. "What they figured out is that engagement really is the time and effort students are putting into their studies. Its got to be relevant, meaningful learning and its got to be challenging, and-this is where the Web2.0 comes in-it has to create relationships."
Tero Toivanen

Music Improves Brain Function | LiveScience - 18 views

  • Laurel Trainor, director of the Institute for Music and the Mind at McMaster University in West Hamilton, Ontario, and colleagues compared preschool children who had taken music lessons with those who did not. Those with some training showed larger brain responses on a number of sound recognition tests given to the children. Her research indicated that musical training appears to modify the brain's auditory cortex.
  • Even a year or two of music training leads to enhanced levels of memory and attention when measured by the same type of tests that monitor electrical and magnetic impulses in the brain.
  • “We therefore hypothesize that musical training (but not necessarily passive listening to music) affects attention and memory, which provides a mechanism whereby musical training might lead to better learning across a number of domains," Trainor said.
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  • Trainor suggested that the reason for this is that the motor and listening skills needed to play an instrument in concert with other people appears to heavily involve attention, memory and the ability to inhibit actions. Merely listening passively to music to Mozart -- or any other composer -- does not produce the same changes in attention and memory.
  • Harvard University researcher Gottfried Schlaug has also studied the cognitive effects of musical training. Schlaug and his colleagues found a correlation between early-childhood training in music and enhanced motor and auditory skills as well as improvements in verbal ability and nonverbal reasoning.
  • The correlation between music training and language development is even more striking for dyslexic children. "[The findings] suggest that a music intervention that strengthens the basic auditory music perception skills of children with dyslexia may also remediate some of their language deficits." Schlaug said.
  • Shahin's main findings are that the changes triggered by listening to musical sound increases with age and the greatest increase occur between age 10 and 13. This most likely indicates this as being a sensitive period for music and speech acquisition.
  • passive listening to music seems to help a person perform certain cognitive tests, at least in the short run. Actual music lessons for kids, however, leads to a longer lasting cognitive success.
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    Even a year or two of music training leads to enhanced levels of memory and attention when measured by the same type of tests that monitor electrical and magnetic impulses in the brain.
Paul Beaufait

TESOL Connections - January 2014 - 20 views

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    "IRIS holds data collection instruments from a wide range of theoretical and methodological perspectives. These include, for example, questionnaires about motivation, attitudes, learning strategies, and intercultural understanding; experimental teaching methods; classroom observation and interview schedules; teaching tasks; sound and video files; word lists; pictures for encouraging learners to use specific structures; language tests for different skills and types of knowledge… and many more besides" (Materials on IRIS, ¶1).
Carlos Quintero

Is Google Making Us Stupid? - 0 views

  • pleads
  • weirdly poignant
  • lengthy
  • ...39 more annotations...
  • strolling
  • wayward
  • struggle.
  • godsend
  • Research
  • telltale
  • Unlike footnotes, to which they’re sometimes likened, hyperlinks don’t merely point to related works; they propel you toward them
  • Marshall McLuhan
  • altogether
  • It is clear that users are not reading online in the traditional sense; indeed there are signs that new forms of “reading” are emerging as users “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins. It almost seems that they go online to avoid reading in the traditional sense.
  • We are not only what we read
  • We are how we read.
  • above
  • When we read online, she says, we tend to become “mere decoders of information.” Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.
  • etched
  • We have to teach our minds how to translate the symbolic characters we see into the language we understand. And the media or other technologies we use in learning and practicing the craft of reading play an important part in shaping the neural circuits inside our brains
  • readers of ideograms, such as the Chinese, develop a mental circuitry for reading that is very different from the circuitry found in those of us whose written language employs an alphabet.
  • subtler
  • You are right,” Nietzsche replied, “our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts.” Under the sway of the machine, writes the German media scholar Friedrich A. Kittler, Nietzsche’s prose “changed from arguments to aphorisms, from thoughts to puns, from rhetoric to telegram style.”
  • James Olds, a professor of neuroscience who directs the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study at George Mason University, says that even the adult mind “is very plastic.
  • “intellectual technologies”—the tools that extend our mental rather than our physical capacities—we inevitably begin to take on the qualities of those technologies
  • “disassociated time from human events and helped create the belief in an independent world of mathematically measurable sequences.”
  • The “abstract framework of divided time” became “the point of reference for both action and thought.”
  • , Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgment to Calculation
  • widespread
  • The process of adapting to new intellectual technologies is reflected in the changing metaphors we use to explain ourselves to ourselves. When the mechanical clock arrived, people began thinking of their brains as operating “like clockwork.” Today, in the age of software, we have come to think of them as operating “like computers.” But the changes, neuroscience tells us, go much deeper than metaphor. Thanks to our brain’s plasticity, the adaptation occurs also at a biological level.
  • The Internet, an immeasurably powerful computing system, is subsuming most of our other intellectual technologies. It’s becoming our map and our clock, our printing press and our typewriter, our calculator and our telephone, and our radio and TV.
  • gewgaws,
  • thanks to the growing power that computer engineers and software coders wield over our intellectual lives,
  • “to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”
  • For us, working on search is a way to work on artificial intelligence.”
  • Certainly if you had all the world’s information directly attached to your brain, or an artificial brain that was smarter than your brain, you’d be better off.
  • to solve problems that have never been solved before
  • worrywart
  • shortsighted
  • eloquently
  • drained
  • “inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance,
  • as we come to rely on computers to mediate our understanding of the world, it is our own intelligence that flattens into artificial intelligence.
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    Is Google Making Us Stupid?
Carlos Quintero

Innovate: Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software - 0 views

  • Web 2.0 has inspired intense and growing interest, particularly as wikis, weblogs (blogs), really simple syndication (RSS) feeds, social networking sites, tag-based folksonomies, and peer-to-peer media-sharing applications have gained traction in all sectors of the education industry (Allen 2004; Alexander 2006)
  • Web 2.0 allows customization, personalization, and rich opportunities for networking and collaboration, all of which offer considerable potential for addressing the needs of today's diverse student body (Bryant 2006).
  • In contrast to earlier e-learning approaches that simply replicated traditional models, the Web 2.0 movement with its associated array of social software tools offers opportunities to move away from the last century's highly centralized, industrial model of learning and toward individual learner empowerment through designs that focus on collaborative, networked interaction (Rogers et al. 2007; Sims 2006; Sheely 2006)
  • ...19 more annotations...
  • learning management systems (Exhibit 1).
  • The reality, however, is that today's students demand greater control of their own learning and the inclusion of technologies in ways that meet their needs and preferences (Prensky 2005)
  • Tools like blogs, wikis, media-sharing applications, and social networking sites can support and encourage informal conversation, dialogue, collaborative content generation, and knowledge sharing, giving learners access to a wide range of ideas and representations. Used appropriately, they promise to make truly learner-centered education a reality by promoting learner agency, autonomy, and engagement in social networks that straddle multiple real and virtual communities by reaching across physical, geographic, institutional, and organizational boundaries.
  • "I have always imagined the information space as something to which everyone has immediate and intuitive access, and not just to browse, but to create” (2000, 216). Social software tools make it easy to contribute ideas and content, placing the power of media creation and distribution into the hands of "the people formerly known as the audience" (Rosen 2006).
  • the most promising settings for a pedagogy that capitalizes on the capabilities of these tools are fully online or blended so that students can engage with peers, instructors, and the community in creating and sharing ideas. In this model, some learners engage in creative authorship, producing and manipulating digital images and video clips, tagging them with chosen keywords, and making this content available to peers worldwide through Flickr, MySpace, and YouTube
  • Student-centered tasks designed by constructivist teachers reach toward this ideal, but they too often lack the dimension of real-world interactivity and community engagement that social software can contribute.
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of teaching and learning (Exhibit 2).
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of teaching and learning
  • Pedagogy 2.0 is defined by: Content: Microunits that augment thinking and cognition by offering diverse perspectives and representations to learners and learner-generated resources that accrue from students creating, sharing, and revising ideas; Curriculum: Syllabi that are not fixed but dynamic, open to negotiation and learner input, consisting of bite-sized modules that are interdisciplinary in focus and that blend formal and informal learning;Communication: Open, peer-to-peer, multifaceted communication using multiple media types to achieve relevance and clarity;Process: Situated, reflective, integrated thinking processes that are iterative, dynamic, and performance and inquiry based;Resources: Multiple informal and formal sources that are rich in media and global in reach;Scaffolds: Support for students from a network of peers, teachers, experts, and communities; andLearning tasks: Authentic, personalized, learner-driven and learner-designed, experiential tasks that enable learners to create content.
  • Instructors implementing Pedagogy 2.0 principles will need to work collaboratively with learners to review, edit, and apply quality assurance mechanisms to student work while also drawing on input from the wider community outside the classroom or institution (making use of the "wisdom of crowds” [Surowiecki 2004]).
  • A small portion of student performance content—if it is new knowledge—will be useful to keep. Most of the student performance content will be generated, then used, and will become stored in places that will never again see the light of day. Yet . . . it is still important to understand that the role of this student content in learning is critical.
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts. In so doing, learners generate their own personal rules and knowledge structures, using them to make sense of their experiences and refining them through interaction and dialogue with others.
  • Other divides are evident. For example, the social networking site Facebook is now the most heavily trafficked Web site in the United States with over 8 million university students connected across academic communities and institutions worldwide. The majority of Facebook participants are students, and teachers may not feel welcome in these communities. Moreover, recent research has shown that many students perceive teaching staff who use Facebook as lacking credibility as they may present different self-images online than they do in face-to-face situations (Mazer, Murphy, and Simonds 2007). Further, students may perceive instructors' attempts to coopt such social technologies for educational purposes as intrusions into their space. Innovative teachers who wish to adopt social software tools must do so with these attitudes in mind.
  • "students want to be able to take content from other people. They want to mix it, in new creative ways—to produce it, to publish it, and to distribute it"
  • Furthermore, although the advent of Web 2.0 and the open-content movement significantly increase the volume of information available to students, many higher education students lack the competencies necessary to navigate and use the overabundance of information available, including the skills required to locate quality sources and assess them for objectivity, reliability, and currency
  • In combination with appropriate learning strategies, Pedagogy 2.0 can assist students in developing such critical thinking and metacognitive skills (Sener 2007; McLoughlin, Lee, and Chan 2006).
  • We envision that social technologies coupled with a paradigm of learning focused on knowledge creation and community participation offer the potential for radical and transformational shifts in teaching and learning practices, allowing learners to access peers, experts, and the wider community in ways that enable reflective, self-directed learning.
  • . By capitalizing on personalization, participation, and content creation, existing and future Pedagogy 2.0 practices can result in educational experiences that are productive, engaging, and community based and that extend the learning landscape far beyond the boundaries of classrooms and educational institutions.
  •  
    About pedagogic 2.0
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    Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software Catherine McLoughlin and Mark J. W. Lee
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