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Nigel Coutts

Moving past the days of the old school yard - The Learner's Way - 9 views

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    Society confronts educational change in an odd, entirely counter intuitive manner. On one hand we acknowledge that education can and should do a better job of preparing our children for the future while on the other we cling to the models of education that we knew. This led educational writer Will Richardson to state that 'the biggest barrier to rethinking schooling in response to the changing worldscape is our own experience in schools'. Our understandings of what school should be like and our imaginings of what school could be like are so clouded by this experience that even the best evidence for change is overlooked or mistrusted.
Nigel Coutts

The right conditions for creativity - The Learner's Way - 16 views

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    Understanding and identifying the barriers to creativity and the conditions which are essential for it to thrive is an important step in the process of ensuring our students leave school with a capacity for creativity at least equal to that which they arrive with.
Maggie Wolfe Riley

What Americans Keep Ignoring About Finland's School Success - Anu Partanen - The Atlantic - 37 views

  • "There's no word for accountability in Finnish," he later told an audience at the Teachers College of Columbia University. "Accountability is something that is left when responsibility has been subtracted."
    • Maggie Wolfe Riley
       
      Wow did this ever strike a chord! Give us more responsibility, and let us show what we can do. When you reduce it to "accountability" you've taken away our power.
    • Kim Schmidt
       
      Perfect!
  • The problem facing education in America isn't the ethnic diversity of the population but the economic inequality of society, and this is precisely the problem that Finnish education reform addressed. More equity at home might just be what America needs to be more competitive abroad
  • Finland's experience shows that it is possible to achieve excellence by focusing not on competition, but on cooperation, and not on choice, but on equity
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  • Decades ago, when the Finnish school system was badly in need of reform, the goal of the program that Finland instituted, resulting in so much success today, was never excellence. It was equity.
  • Real winners do not compete
  • cooperation
  • instrument to even out social inequality
  • Finland offers all pupils free school meals, easy access to health care, psychological counseling, and individualized student guidance
Tero Toivanen

Flipped classrooms: teaching at home and doing homework at school | koaa.com | Colorado... - 33 views

  • The 5th graders in Doug Hinkle's class at the DaVinci Academy in School District 20 are among the first elementary students in the country to be part of a "flipped" classroom.
  • Instead of spending 20 minutes each hour lecturing, Mr. Hinkle pre-records video podcasts to teach his lessons.
  • Removing the lectures from the school day frees up Hinkle to give more attention to individual students or small groups. If you were to drop into his class unannounced, it may seem a bit chaotic, but Hinkle says it's a controlled chaos.
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  • The online community flippedclassroom.com boasts 3,000 teacher members. Sams says he's routinely asked to join conference calls or use Skype to address educators and lawmakers around the world.
  • "I've been to Norway, I've been to Germany, I've been to probably 6 or 7 different states just this year and it's only March."
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    "The 5th graders in Doug Hinkle's class at the DaVinci Academy in School District 20 are among the first elementary students in the country to be part of a "flipped" classroom."
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    It a great idea , today I was attending a high school implimenting location based learning project. I actualy came to the same conclusion. forml knowledge would have better been aquired through reading and recorded information while the class would have been better used for "workshop" activity in which students would have created location based learning objects
shelbyrubottom

Grammar-Quizzes: Practice on Points of English Grammar (ESL/ELL) - 32 views

shared by shelbyrubottom on 05 Jan 12 - Cached
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    "Grammar-Quizzes.com is an open educational resource for understanding, learning and practicing English grammar usage. These materials present simple grammar concepts and are most appropriate for non-native speakers, but also include practices that could be used for K-12 native speakers" (Mission, ¶1, 2012.01.05).
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    **** English grammar: exercises and theory
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    This Site helps teachers with grammar lessons and also lets the students study and absorb more vocabulary and grammar words.
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    Wow! Great resource. I will learn a lot with this site. Thanks, Shelby!
Tero Toivanen

The new school | The Ideas Economy - 31 views

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    Ideas from Joel Klein and Sir Ken Robinson
Dimitris Tzouris

How to compete with Generation Z | Penelope Trunk - 20 views

  • 1. When it comes to learning, keep your bar very high.
  • 2. Walk a narrow path so you can keep learning to jump off the path.
  • 3. Learn by way of discovering what you care about, and not the other way around.
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  • 4. Cater to your learning style.
  • 5. Accept that lifelong learning is a huge time investment.
  • 6. Spend as much time unlearning as you do learning.
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    "The question is, how do we get this lifelong learning bug now, as adults, so we can compete with the young people when they enter the workforce."
Philippe Scheimann

Edge Conference 2009: Inspiration and Innovation in Teaching and Teacher Education - 10 views

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    list of papers + possiblity to download them
Danny Nicholson

What happens when you give a class of 8 year olds an iPod touch each? - 0 views

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    The 7 minute movie was filmed at Burnt Oak Junior School in the U.K. Eight-year olds there have been using a class set of iPod touches for a couple weeks. The video interviews the class teacher, headteacher, and students about the experience.
Philippe Scheimann

Sustainable eSchool - 0 views

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    initiative made by POLITECH Institute (www.politech-institute.eu )
Philippe Scheimann

I (ego) and e-Identity (e-ID) - 0 views

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    Paper to be presented at the Edge 2009: Inspiration and Innovation in Teacher education , 14 to 16 October 2009
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    A new way to understand the human being and the consequences on education and teacher training. Written by Eyal Bloch and myself (Philippe Scheimann)
Philippe Scheimann

A Vision of Students Today (& What Teachers Must Do) | Britannica Blog - 0 views

  • It has taken years of acclimatizing our youth to stale artificial environments, piles of propaganda convincing them that what goes on inside these environments is of immense importance, and a steady hand of discipline should they ever start to question it.
    • Russell D. Jones
       
      There is a huge investment in resources, time, and tradition from the teacher, the instutions, the society, and--importantly--the students. Students have invested much more time (proportional to their short lives) in learning how to be skillful at the education game. Many don't like teachers changing the rules of the game just when they've become proficient at it.
  • Last spring I asked my students how many of them did not like school. Over half of them rose their hands. When I asked how many of them did not like learning, no hands were raised. I have tried this with faculty and get similar results. Last year’s U.S. Professor of the Year, Chris Sorensen, began his acceptance speech by announcing, “I hate school.” The crowd, made up largely of other outstanding faculty, overwhelmingly agreed. And yet he went on to speak with passionate conviction about his love of learning and the desire to spread that love. And there’s the rub. We love learning. We hate school. What’s worse is that many of us hate school because we love learning.
    • Russell D. Jones
       
      So we (teachers and students) are willing to endure a little (or a lot) of uncomfortableness in order to pursue that love of learning.
  • They tell us, first of all, that despite appearances, our classrooms have been fundamentally changed.
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  • While most of our classrooms were built under the assumption that information is scarce and hard to find, nearly the entire body of human knowledge now flows through and around these rooms in one form or another, ready to be accessed by laptops, cellphones, and iPods. Classrooms built to re-enforce the top-down authoritative knowledge of the teacher are now enveloped by a cloud of ubiquitous digital information where knowledge is made, not found, and authority is continuously negotiated through discussion and participation. In short, they tell us that our walls no longer mark the boundaries of our classrooms.
  • And that’s what has been wrong all along. Some time ago we started taking our walls too seriously – not just the walls of our classrooms, but also the metaphorical walls that we have constructed around our “subjects,” “disciplines,” and “courses.” McLuhan’s statement about the bewildered child confronting “the education establishment where information is scarce but ordered and structured by fragmented, classified patterns, subjects, and schedules” still holds true in most classrooms today. The walls have become so prominent that they are even reflected in our language, so that today there is something called “the real world” which is foreign and set apart from our schools. When somebody asks a question that seems irrelevant to this real world, we say that it is “merely academic.”
  • We can use them in ways that empower and engage students in real world problems and activities, leveraging the enormous potentials of the digital media environment that now surrounds us. In the process, we allow students to develop much-needed skills in navigating and harnessing this new media environment, including the wisdom to know when to turn it off. When students are engaged in projects that are meaningful and important to them, and that make them feel meaningful and important, they will enthusiastically turn off their cellphones and laptops to grapple with the most difficult texts and take on the most rigorous tasks.
  • At the root of your question is a much more interesting observation that many of the styles of self-directed learning now enabled through technology are in conflict with the traditional teacher-student relationship. I don’t think the answer is to annihilate that relationship, but to rethink it.
  • Personally, I increasingly position myself as the manager of a learning environment in which I also take part in the learning. This can only happen by addressing real and relevant problems and questions for which I do not know the answers. That’s the fun of it. We become collaborators, with me exploring the world right along with my students.
  • our walls, the particular architectonics of the disciplines we work within, provide students with the conversational, narrative, cognitive, epistemological, methodological, ontological, the –ogical means for converting mere information into knowledge.
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    useful article , I need to finish it and look at this 'famous clip' that had 1 million viewers
Melissa Seifman

Education Outrage: Why do we still have schools? - 1 views

  • Competition: Why should school be a competitive event?
  • We learn what we choose to know in real life.
  • Stress: When 6 year olds are stressed about going to school you know that something is wrong.
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  • Right answers: School teaches that there are right answers.
  • But, in real life, there are very few right answers.
  • Bullying and peer pressure
  • In school there are always other kids telling you how to dress, how to act, how to be cool.
  • Stifling of curiosity: Isn’t it obvious that learning is really about curiosity?
  • Adults earn about things they want to learn about. Before the age of 6, prior to school, one kid becomes a dinosaur specialist while another knows all about dog breeds. Outside of school people drive their own learning. Schools eliminate this natural behavior.
    • Tero Toivanen
       
      Exactly!
  • Subjects chosen for you:
  • Classrooms:
  • Classrooms make no sense as a venue for learning unless of course you want to save money and have 30 (or worse hundreds of) students be handled by one teacher.
  • Schools cannot work as places of learning if they employ classrooms.
  • Grades: Any professor can tell you that students are pretty much concerned with whether what you are telling them will be on the test and what they might do for extra credit.
    • Melissa Seifman
       
      I disagree - Employers do have rating systems, performance evaluations, but most of those are on the whole person, not just technical or academic skills
  • Parents do not give grades to children and employers do not give grades to employees. They judge their work and progress for sure, but not by assigning numbers to a report card.
  • Certification: We all know why people attend college. They do primarily to say they are college graduates so they can get a job or go on to a professional school.
    • Caroline Roche
       
      So, why is this the student's fault? Why blame, or disadvatage them for this? We should be fighting the system that causes students to work like this, not blaming them for doing it! it is the constant testing and league table system that is wrong.
  • Confined children: Children like to run around.
  • Of course in school, sitting still is the norm. So we have come up with this wonderful idea of ADD, i.e. drug those who won’t sit still into submission. Is the system sick or what?
  • Academics viewed as winners: Who are the smartest kids in school?
  • Those who are good at these subjects go on to be professors. So those are certainly the smartest people we have in our society.
  • But, I can tell you from personal experience that our society doesn’t respect professors all that much, so something is wrong here.
  • Practical skills not valued: When I was young there were academic high schools and trade high schools. Trade high schools were for dumb kids. Academic high schools were for smart kids.
  • The need to please teachers: People who succeed at school are invariably people who are good out at figuring what the teacher wants and giving it to them.
  • In real life there is no teacher to please and these “grade grubbers” often find themselves lost.
  • Self worth questioned: School is full of winners and losers.
  • In school, most everyone sees themselves as a loser. Why do we allow this to happen?
  • Politicians in charge: Politicians demand reform but they wouldn’t know reform if it hit them over the head.
  • Major learning by doing mechanism ignored: And last but not least, scholars from Plato to Dewey have pointed that people learn by doing. That is how we learn. Doing. Got it? Apparently not. Very little doing in schools. Unless you count filling in circles with number 2 pencils as doing.
  • Government use of education for repression: As long as there have been governments there have been governments who wanted people to think that the governments (and the country) is very good.
  • School is about teaching “truth.”
  • Discovery not valued: The most important things we learn we teach ourselves.
    • Tero Toivanen
       
      Autotelic learning!
  • This kind of learning is not valued in school because it might lead to, heaven forbid, failure, and failure is a really bad word in school. Except failure is how we learn, which is pretty much why school doesn’t work.
    • Tero Toivanen
       
      Exactly!
  • Boredom ignored: Boredom is a bad thing. We drug bored kids with Ritalin so they will stop being bored.
  • What they mean is that school should be like they remember rather than how it is now
    • Caroline Roche
       
      Not accepting students with straight A's only shows your own prejudices. Students can be good at a range of subjects, without being passionately interested in all of them. Lots of people are self motivated, without being teacher pleasers, they just wish to do their best in everything for their own satisfaction.
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    Why do we have schools? Instead of answering this question by listing all the good things that schools provide, which anyone can do, I will turn the question around: What is bad about having schools?
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    Why do we have schools? Instead of answering this question by listing all the good things that schools provide, which anyone can do, I will turn the question around: What is bad about having schools?
Ruth Howard

GAME School Opens in New York:Quest to Learn | HASTAC - 0 views

  • In an atmosphere of academic excellence, Quest aims to foster the type of learning that is possible today—learning based on access to online resources and tools from around the globe, learning that supports customized content for every student on demand, learning that is game-like in its ability to inspire and motivate. “In an age when low-income urban kids continue to drop out of school at alarming rates, yet research is consistently showing the high levels of engagement youth are exhibiting in various media platforms, it is incumbent upon educators to take notice and indeed redirect teaching methods to meet the needs and interests of students,” says Schwartz.
  • a robust industry mentorship program allow students opportunities to learn alongside experts, s
  • critical pedagogic tool in secondary education.”
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  • 21st century learning materials and assessment
  • teacher training and digital arts
  • “learn by doing” through coursework focused on helping students make connections between ideas and skills in real world contexts. Enhanced literacy and math instruction occurs daily and all students have opportunities to gain expertise in reading, writing, and designing with digital media, including taking courses in computer programming, media arts, and game design. A fully integrated Wellness curriculum supports students in achieving healthy hearts, minds, and bodies.
  • based on research on how students today learn best
  • daily workshops in numeracy and literacy for struggling students,
  • cues from the media-rich learning kids are engaged in outside of school
  • expect a school that is all about beauty, science, thinking, learning, excitemen
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    A new New York school-curriculum by game designers fully integrating a new learning ecology.
Ruth Howard

Meta matters » New report on site blocking and Web 2.0 - 0 views

  • focusing on Web 2.0 and site blocking in schools, has just been released. The report looks at identifying and overcoming barriers associated with site blocking with regards to Web 2.0 services.
  • Key findings include: Web 2.0 provides rich opportunities for teaching and learning Site blocking is a necessary and key component of every school’s overall cyber-safety strategy Cyber-safety concerns head the list of barriers to the adoption of Web 2.0 in Schools Current Site blocking methods are blunt instruments when applied to Web 2.0 sites Unblocking Web 2.0 sites must be done within a clear policy framework Teachers need professional learning support in order to effectively use Web 2.0 in teaching and learning.
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    Dear admin New Australian Reports on Collaboration and Site blocking by schools make recommendations for enabling web 2.0 for learning...
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