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Nigel Coutts

Curiosity as the edge of knowledge phenomenon that drives learning - The Learner's Way - 2 views

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    We are driven by curiosity. It is an innately human quality that has driven us to explore, ask questions, investigate, wonder why and search for a deeper understanding. In a very fundamental way curiosity is the driver of all self-directed learning. It is our desire to find out more, unlock new knowledge and answer our questions (big ones and little ones) that compels us to learn. Sir Ken Robinson famously and provocatively asked "Do Schools Kill Creativity?". The same question might be asked about curiosity.
Nigel Coutts

Debating false dichotomies: a new front in the education wars - The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    Sometimes, it seems everyone who ever went to school is an expert on education and has a plan to make it better. Actual teaching experience, years of professional learning and formal training are all easily swept aside. The result is an ongoing dialog around what schools should do, what teachers need to do more of or less of and how the academic success of the nation is linked to strategy x or y.
Dwayne Abrahams

Google Changes Its Tune on Interviews - Vault: Blog - 12 views

  • Thus, the old pre-reqs are out: GPAs, transcripts, SATS.  In fact, Google is beginning to disregard academic educations altogether: they're just not a good predictor of success at the company. Says Bock, "After two or three years, your ability to perform at Google is completely unrelated to how you performed when you were in school, because the skills you required in college are very different. You’re also fundamentally a different person. You learn and grow, you think about things differently." According to the Times, Google is putting its money where its mouth is: they've actually increased their hires with no college education—14% of some of its teams have never been to school, according to Bock. Instead, the emphasis is on hiring candidates who are leaders, and work well in teams. The only way to discover this, says Bock, is through "structured" behavior interviews that assess how a person makes decisions. The winning interviewees will be able to demonstrate that they are "consistent and fair in how [they] think about making decisions and that there’s an element of predictability." This is key to building trust among team members once hired, he explains. "If a leader is consistent, people on their teams experience tremendous freedom, because then they know that within certain parameters, they can do whatever they want. If your manager is all over the place, you’re never going to know what you can do, and you’re going to experience it as very restrictive."
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    Google is beginning to disregard academic educations altogether: they're just not a good predictor of success at the company.  According to the Times, Google is putting its money where its mouth is: they've actually increased their hires with no college education-14% of some of its teams have never been to school, according to Bock. Instead, the emphasis is on hiring candidates who are leaders, and work well in teams.
Tero Toivanen

10 Educational iPad Apps Recommended by Explore Knowledge Academy| The Committed Sardine - 73 views

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    "There are so many great educational apps out there and more are being created daily. It's so hard to keep up, but luckily ESchool News has this article with 10 really great ones for you to focus on for now."
Tero Toivanen

Times Higher Education - From where I sit - Everyone wins in this free-for-all - 11 views

  • The term open educational resources (OER) encapsulates the simple but powerful idea that the world's knowledge is a public good. The internet offers unprecedented opportunities to share, use and reuse knowledge. Sadly, most of the planet is underserved when it comes to post-secondary education.
  • But while in our research we have no problem with sharing and building on the ideas of others, in education the perception is that we must lock teaching materials behind restrictive copyright barriers that minimise sharing.
  • Sometimes universities justify this position on the grounds that the open licensing of courses will damage their advantage in the student recruitment market. These publicly funded institutions expect taxpayers to pay twice for learning materials.
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  • Individuals are free to learn from OER hosted on the open web. It is, therefore, plausible that we can design and develop an "OER university" that will provide free learning for all students worldwide.
  • Working with Otago Polytechnic in New Zealand, the University of Southern Queensland in Australia and Athabasca University in Canada as founding anchor partners, we aim to help provide flexible pathways for OER learners to earn formal academic credentials and pay reduced fees for assessment and credit services under the community service mission of modern universities.
  • The OER Foundation will host an open planning meeting on 23 February to lay the foundations for this significant intervention. With support from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation, the meeting will be streamed on the web, and we invite all educational leaders to join us at this meeting in planning for the mainstream adoption of OER in post-secondary institutions.
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    The term open educational resources (OER) encapsulates the simple but powerful idea that the world's knowledge is a public good. The internet offers unprecedented opportunities to share, use and reuse knowledge. Sadly, most of the planet is underserved when it comes to post-secondary education.
Tero Toivanen

Education Futures - The role of schools in Education 3.0 - 1 views

  • Education 3.0 schools produce knowledge-producing students, not automatons
  • Education 3.0 schools share, remix and capitalize on new ideas.
  • schools will express new forms of leadership within the communities that they serve.
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  • Education 3.0 schools embrace change rather than fighting change.
  • schools may become the driving forces of creating new paradigms that will drive this and future centuries.
  • Education 1.0 schools cannot teach 3.0 students.
    • Tero Toivanen
       
      It's time to change!
  • If schools continue to embrace the 1.0 paradigm and are outmoded by students that thrive in a 3.0 society, we can only expect continuous failure.
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    An an era driven by globalized relationships, innovative social technologies, and fueled by accelerating change, how should we reinvent schools?
Ruth Howard

Making Invisible Learning Visible | HASTAC - 0 views

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    Wacko! The Knowledge Project discussed here in this forum also...
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    The HASTAC Scholars fellowship program recognizes graduate and undergraduate students who are engaged in innovative work across the areas of technology, the arts, the humanities, and the social sciences. The HASTAC Scholars host regular discussion forums here featuring their own ground-breaking research and interests alongside those of leaders and innovators in the digital humanities, such as social networking pioneer Howard Rheingold, open source scholar Christopher Kelty, and Director of the Office of Digital Humanities for the National Endowment for the Humanities, Brett Bobley.
Bill Graziadei, Ph.D. (aka Dr. G)

Innovate: Rhizomatic Education: Community as Curriculum - 0 views

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    The pace of technological change has challenged historical notions of what counts as knowledge. Dave Cormier describes an alternative to the traditional notion of knowledge. In place of the expert-centered pedagogical planning and publishing cycle, Cormier suggests a rhizomatic model of learning. In the rhizomatic model, knowledge is negotiated, and the learning experience is a social as well as a personal knowledge creation process with mutable goals and constantly negotiated premises. The rhizome metaphor, which represents a critical leap in coping with the loss of a canon against which to compare, judge, and value knowledge, may be particularly apt as a model for disciplines on the bleeding edge where the canon is fluid and knowledge is a moving target.
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