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Trevor Holmes

Grand Text Auto » Blog-Based Peer Review: Four Surprises - 1 views

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    blog-based peer review
Mark Morton

The Pitfalls of Academic Mentorships - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • At the height of Plumb's career through the 1960s and early 1970s, the word "mentor" was used only occasionally in academe or the corporate world.
  • The era of the mentor began in earnest only in the mid-1970s. The Yale psychologist Daniel J. Levinson, best known for his studies of middle age, had a precise definition quoted in The Christian Science Monitor on February 14, 1977: a person 8 to 15 years older than the "mentee," a "peer or older brother" rather than a "distant father." Levinson continued: "He takes the younger man under his wing, ... imparts his wisdom, cares, sponsors, criticizes, and bestows his blessing."
  • Corporate mentoring took center stage in 1978 and 1979 with two articles in the Harvard Business Review. The title of the first, an interview with a group of senior executives from the Jewel Companies, echoes to this day: "Everyone Who Makes It Has a Mentor."
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  • Harriet Zuckerman's 1977 book on the scientific elite and American Nobel laureates had shown how crucial the system of graduate supervision had been; more than half of America's Nobel laureates by the year 1972 had been students, postdoctoral fellows, or junior collaborators with older laureates, and many others had worked with major nonlaureates.
  • For all my gratitude for such support, I remain skeptical about the mentor-protégé bond and see the "Much Ado about Mentors," to quote the title of Roche's late 1970s Harvard Business Review article, as the start of a disturbing trend.
  • Yet the search for a mentor, for a safe initiation into academic or corporate mysteries, can overshadow the entrepreneurial spirit. Roche himself pointed out that mentored executives "do not consider having a mentor an important ingredient in their own success." They credited their aptitudes, hard work, and even luck ahead of mentoring.
  • The current trend toward overvaluing mentors is understandable but mistaken.
Mark Morton

https://orderline.education.gov.uk/gempdf/1849625344/QCDA104983_review_of_the_literature_on_marking_reliability.pdf - 1 views

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    A review of literature about the reliability (or unreliability) of marking assignments. 
Mark Morton

The Journal of Cooperative Education and Internships - 0 views

  • Title: The Silent Minority: Working with Traditional American Indian Students in Cooperative Education Programs #2 Author: Newell, J., Tyon, M. C. Volume: 25 Accepted Date: 5/1/1989 Page Numbers: 79 - 87 Abstract: Addresses the needs of a traditional Native American population to find work and job success in a culture, which is foreign. Reviews values of Native Americans and the relationship of these values to different employment situations. Suggests that the concepts discussed in this article may be critical for the success of traditional Native American student participation in cooperative education Document: You must log in to view file.
Mark Morton

One Professor's Dialectic of Mentoring - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 1 views

shared by Mark Morton on 25 Nov 09 - Cached
  • Mentor in a Manual: Climbing the Academic Ladder to Tenure
  • Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia
  • Ms. Mentor on its online Career Network
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  • I have come to recognize just how much my own development has depended on those whom I have mentored
  • personality contrasted sharply with my own
  • Marx's dictum that "even the educators need to be educated.
Mark Morton

Disrupting Ourselves: The Problem of Learning in Higher Education (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu - 1 views

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    A growing appreciation for the porous boundaries between the classroom and life experience, along with the power of social learning, authentic audiences, and integrative contexts, has created not only promising changes in learning but also disruptive moments in teaching.
Mark Morton

EDUCAUSE Review - 0 views

shared by Mark Morton on 24 Mar 15 - No Cached
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