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Trevor Holmes

Survival Exercise Scenarios - Description of a Group Dynamics Team Building Exercise - 0 views

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    use this a lot in group process workshops
Mark Morton

How Professors Really Feel About Digital Technology [#Study] | EdTech Magazine - 1 views

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    As a follow-up to their study on how professors view online learning, Inside Higher Ed partnered with Babson Survey Research Group to explore how college professors and administrators interact with technology. The survey, summarized in Digital Faculty: Professors, Teaching and Technology, posed questions about digital learning content, e-books, social media, communication, learning management software and a variety of other technology-related issues. Here are a few key points from this excellent report.
Jane Holbrook

5 stage model of interaction by Gilly Salmon - 0 views

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    Individual access and the ability of participants to use CMC are essential prerequisites for conference participation (stage one, at the base of the flights of steps). Stage two involves individual participants establishing their online identities and then finding others with whom to interact. At stage three, participants give information relevant to the course to each other. Up to and including stage three, a form of co-operation occurs, i.e. support for each person's goals. At stage four, course-related group discussions occur and the interaction becomes more collaborative. The communication depends on the establishment of common understandings. At stage five, participants look for more benefits from the system to help them achieve personal goals, explore how to integrate CMC into other forms of learning and reflect on the learning processes.
Jane Holbrook

Blended course design web presentations - 0 views

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    From Alan Aycock at the University of Wisconsin - a collection of video presentations on different aspects of blended course design and delivery.
Mark Morton

The Pitfalls of Academic Mentorships - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • At the height of Plumb's career through the 1960s and early 1970s, the word "mentor" was used only occasionally in academe or the corporate world.
  • The era of the mentor began in earnest only in the mid-1970s. The Yale psychologist Daniel J. Levinson, best known for his studies of middle age, had a precise definition quoted in The Christian Science Monitor on February 14, 1977: a person 8 to 15 years older than the "mentee," a "peer or older brother" rather than a "distant father." Levinson continued: "He takes the younger man under his wing, ... imparts his wisdom, cares, sponsors, criticizes, and bestows his blessing."
  • Corporate mentoring took center stage in 1978 and 1979 with two articles in the Harvard Business Review. The title of the first, an interview with a group of senior executives from the Jewel Companies, echoes to this day: "Everyone Who Makes It Has a Mentor."
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  • Harriet Zuckerman's 1977 book on the scientific elite and American Nobel laureates had shown how crucial the system of graduate supervision had been; more than half of America's Nobel laureates by the year 1972 had been students, postdoctoral fellows, or junior collaborators with older laureates, and many others had worked with major nonlaureates.
  • For all my gratitude for such support, I remain skeptical about the mentor-protégé bond and see the "Much Ado about Mentors," to quote the title of Roche's late 1970s Harvard Business Review article, as the start of a disturbing trend.
  • Yet the search for a mentor, for a safe initiation into academic or corporate mysteries, can overshadow the entrepreneurial spirit. Roche himself pointed out that mentored executives "do not consider having a mentor an important ingredient in their own success." They credited their aptitudes, hard work, and even luck ahead of mentoring.
  • The current trend toward overvaluing mentors is understandable but mistaken.
Mark Morton

CATME Team Maker - 0 views

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    For teams to be successful, the teamwork environment must be managed. The Team-Maker forms teams according to user-specified criteria. The Comprehensive Assessment for Team-Member Effectiveness (CATME) gathers peer evaluation data and self evaluations to assess how effectively each team member contributes to the team and gives feedback to team members and to the person administering the teams.
Mark Morton

Introduction to Discussion Forums - YouTube - 0 views

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    A three-minute screencast on using discussion forums in a learning management system. 
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