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Neuro Education Initiative - 1 views

shared by Mark Morton on 16 Apr 12 - Cached
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    The School of Education's Neuro-Education Initiative furthers the understanding of how research findings from the cognitive and neurosciences has the potential to inform teaching and learning through research, collaboration, and advocacy. In partnership with the School of Medicine, Kennedy-Krieger Institute, and the Brain Science Institute, this Initiative fosters dialog among educators and brain science researchers to develop joint research projects and magnifies the potential for current findings to enrich educational practice.
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Blended Learning in Higher Education: Framework, Principles, and Guidelines: D. Randy G... - 1 views

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    This groundbreaking book offers a down-to-earth resource for the practical application of blended learning in higher education as well as a comprehensive examination of the topic. Well-grounded in research, Blended Learning in Higher Education clearly demonstrates how the blended learning approach embraces the traditional values of face-to-face teaching and integrates the best practices of online learning. This approach has proven to both enhance and expand the effectiveness and efficiency of teaching and learning in higher education across disciplines.
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Improved Learning in a Large-Enrollment Physics Class - 1 views

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    Abstract: 'We compared the amounts of learning achieved using two different instructional approaches under controlled conditions. We measured the learning of a specific set of topics and objectives when taught by 3 hours of traditional lecture given by an experienced highly rated instructor and 3 hours of instruction given by a trained but inexperienced instructor using instruction based on research in cognitive psychology and physics education. The comparison was made between two large sections (N = 267 and N = 271) of an introductory undergraduate physics course. We found increased student attendance, higher engagement, and more than twice the learning in the section taught using research-based instruction." 
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EcoMUVE > About Us - 0 views

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    EcoMUVE is an exciting new curriculum research project at the Harvard Graduate School of Education that uses immersive virtual environments to teach middle school students about ecosystems and causal patterns
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Wikiversity:Main Page - Wikiversity - 5 views

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    Wikiversity is a Wikimedia Foundation project devoted to learning resources, learning projects, and research for use in all levels, types, and styles of education from pre-school to university, including professional training and informal learning.
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Flipping the Classroom: The Why and the How - Download Free Content from Apple Distingu... - 0 views

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    Course Description This course is designed for teachers and administrators interested in the flipped classroom model.  The course has two main components: WHY flip your classroom and HOW to flip your classroom. Why Flip? Participants will get a glimpse into the what and why of the flipped classroom beginning with an iBook.  This iBook will provide readers with the history, background, research, and examples of  flipped classrooms through interactive texts, keynotes, and videos.  This text is the preface to the second portion of the course addressing how to flip the classroom.
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Best, Worst Learning Tips: Flash Cards Are Good, Highlighting Is Bad | TIME.com - 1 views

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    In a world as fast-changing and full of information as our own, every one of us - from schoolchildren to college students to working adults - needs to know how to learn well. Yet evidence suggests that most of us don't use the learning techniques that science has proved most effective. Worse, research finds that learning strategies we do commonly employ, like rereading and highlighting, are among the least effective.
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http://www.personeel.unimaas.nl/maarten.wesel/Documenten/The%20influence%20of%20portfol... - 0 views

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     The electronic portfolio offers many advantages to  its paper-based counterpart,  including - but not limited to - hyperlinked navigation, adding multimedia and the ease of sharing the portfolio. Previous research showed that the quality of a portfolio does not depend on the medium used. This paper studies the effect of the portfolio medium on perceived support for self-reflection and on the students' learning outcomes. We made use of the fact that during this study about half of the first year medical students used an electronic portfolio (n=157) and the other half a paper-based portfolio (n=190)
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When a Mentor Becomes a Thief - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • The solution, then, is clear: Everyone needs to start talking. Before a single beaker gets rinsed, the question of authorship has to be laid on the table,
  • junior researchers should keep detailed notes of their research.
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The Best of Both Worlds: A Critical Pedagogy of Place -- Gruenewald 32 (4): 3 -- Educat... - 1 views

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    "place-based pedagogy"
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Carnegie Foundation Creates New 'Owner's Manual' for Doctoral Programs - Faculty - The ... - 0 views

  • Take, for example, the concept of apprenticeship, to which the Carnegie researchers devote an entire chapter. The faculty-master and student-apprentice relationship as the signature pedagogical structure of doctoral education dates back to the university's medieval roots. But, the Carnegie authors say, it's time that model was updated.
  • The study recommends that doctoral programs adopt new structures that allow students to have several intellectual mentors and come to think of mentorship as less an accident of interpersonal chemistry and as more a set of techniques that can be learned, assessed, and rewarded.
  • Arizona State University that awards an annual $5,000 cash prize to an "outstanding doctoral mentor" or another at the mathematics department of the University of Southern California that places new graduate students in "mentoring triplets" with both a faculty mentor and a more experienced graduate student.
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The Catalytic Mentor - Faculty - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • = Premium Content Log In | Create a Free Account | Subscribe Now Wednesday, November 25, 2009 Subscribe Today! Home News Opinion & Ideas Facts & Figures Topics Jobs Advice Forums $('#navbarbtnForums').attr("href", "/forums/"); Events Faculty Administration Technology Community Colleges International Special Reports People The Ticker Current Issue Faculty Home News Faculty function check() { if (document.getElementById("searchInput").value == '' ) { alert('Please enter search terms'); return false; } else return true; } $().ready(function() { $('#email-popup').jqm({trigger: 'a.show-email', modal: 'true'}); $('#share-popup').jqm({trigger: 'a.show-share', modal: 'true'}); }); E-mail function printPage() { window.print(); } $(document).ready(function(){ $('.print-btn').click(printPage); }); Print Share August 1, 2003 The Catalytic Mentor By PIPER FOGG An award-winning chemist at Rutgers U. takes students under her wingHere on the main campus of Rutgers University, Martha Greenblatt often passes buildings that were once part of Camp Kilmer, a military base that received European refugees in the 1950s. An internationally known chemist, the Rutgers professor remembers the camp from her days as a teenager from Hungary, alone and unsure of what lay ahead. Now her lab is filled with smart young graduate students from China, Russia, Turkey, and the United States. Over the years, she has had 27 graduate students and 25 postdoctoral students in her lab. Because of her own personal and professional experiences, she understands what they are going through, and she goes out of her way to guide them. That means pushing them in their research, encouraging them to make outside contacts, even coaching some in English, all to develop in them the skills to become independent thinkers and successful scientists. In the spring, Ms. Greenblatt, 62, received the Francis P. Garvan-John M. Olin Medal, given annually in recognition of significant achievements by a female chemist in America. The American Chemical Society honored her as "a leading solid-state chemist and scholar, teacher, science advocate, and outstanding role model." The award is particularly satisfying to her because it celebrates her serving as a mentor to young scientists. In addition, the university has made her a Board of Governors professor, the highest rank a Rutgers faculty member can hold. In any field, a great mentor can make a big difference. But, in the sciences, such a figure can mean the difference between a lackluster dissertation and a mediocre job offer, on the one hand, and a publication that is a catalys
  • In any field, a great mentor can make a big difference. But, in the sciences, such a figure can mean the difference between a lackluster dissertation and a mediocre job offer, on the one hand, and a publication that is a catalyst for a promising career in academe or industry, on the other. An effective mentor acts as an advocate, a role model, and a guide to academic and professional development.
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The face of public science - 1 views

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    Every day, scientists, researchers and regulators working in government departments, agencies and laboratories contribute to the health, safety and prosperity of Canadians and their communities.
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Sample Size Calculator by Raosoft, Inc. - 0 views

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    An online tool to calculate sample size for surveys
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Randy Bass: The Scholarship of Teaching: What's the Problem? (Introduction) - 0 views

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    Go%20Randy%20Bass!
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Are You a Good Protégé? - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • Someone who is respected within the field and has contacts who can help you with publications and jobs. Someone who is knowledgeable about the university and its politics and policies. Someone who takes the time to help with your studies and your career. Someone who does not exploit you. Someone who is not a disinterested observer of your career but cares about you as a person and is supportive -- like a coach cheering you on.
  • the profile is similar to how junior faculty members would describe their ideal career mentor, too.
  • The mentor relationship is alive and well in the sciences, where there is a strong tradition of senior researchers bringing postdocs and new assistant professors into their laboratories and grant projects. But in the social sciences and humanities, probably because of the difficult job market, relations between established scholars and newcomers to the profession seem strained.
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  • failing to seek, find, and keep a good relationship with a mentor during the tenure-track years -- and beyond -- is a serious mistake.
  • Establishing clear communications, sometimes across the borders of age and culture, is, thus, a key to clarifying what can be asked of mentor and protégé.
  • The good protégé also appreciates the borders of the relationship with a mentor. You want to be on good terms of course, but there is such a thing as over-fraternization.
  • Being a good protégé also means learning to accept criticism gracefully.
  • A useful mentor is one who is willing to give us bad news, but a proper protégé is one who is willing to hear it.
  • Both parties must be sensitive to the degree of independence the protégé wants (and needs) from the mentor
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Do You Have a Bad Mentor? - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • In every assistant professor there seems to lurk a Karate Kid seeking a Mr. Miyagi who will train his acolyte to be a skilled warrior in the art of research, teaching, and service and impart pithy life lessons along the way. Such singular folks exist, and you may find one. But it's far more likely that you will find several mentors who, while not well-versed in all aspects of academic life, will offer good advice in one or another area.
  • Someone who got tenure 30 years ago may not appreciate what it takes to get tenure today. The young tenure tracker may not know, or catch on quickly enough, that the same mentor who is a wizard of statistical methodology is offering awful advice about handling disruptions in the classroom. Or perhaps the issue is transference: A scholar may excel at conceptualizing new theory, for example, but may not be good at teaching others to do likewise.
  • In the words of Ronald Reagan, one should "trust but verify."
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  • One sign that your mentors are actually qualified: They recognize and readily disclose their own strengths and limitations.
  • sometimes when you select an adviser, you are also picking a fight, even without intention
  • So the perfect mentor is uncommon. But academe is overflowing with many honorable and wise men and women who give up their time and energy to help up-and-coming colleagues.
  • Sorting out the good mentors from the hapless or malicious is a matter of some nuance as well as necessity.
  • Not getting any advice about succeeding as a professor is unfortunate; getting bad advice can be worse.
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A Helping Hand for Young Faculty Members - Faculty - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • "She wasn't really familiar with my discipline, but she was able to give me perspectives about the institution from a different vantage point. I really grew to appreciate that."
  • an increasing number of colleges now rely on formal mentor programs, many of them campuswide, to give new faculty members guaranteed access to senior professors who can help them.
  • These days, actively seeking career guidance within the ivory tower doesn't hold the stigma for new professors that it once did
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  • "It used to be sink or swim." Either you were cut out for the professoriate, or you weren't, she says. "But now you walk into a new place and it's not shameful to need help."
  • baffling task of pinning down the right mix of research, teaching, and service that will lead to tenure.
  • On a scale of 1 to 5, with the highest number representing "very important," the mean score for informal mentoring was 4.49. Formal mentoring was slightly less important with a mean score of 4.04.
  • "We try to have multiple pathways for people to engage in finding mentors,"
  • Officials at Yale University are fast-tracking efforts to shape the informal faculty mentors that is common on its campus into a more formal mentor process
  • Ms. Trower says that the more corporate mentorship mode — which includes training mentors and protégés, setting goals, and measuring the end result — isn't yet common in academe. Meanwhile, formal mentor programs do have at least one drawback: a mismatch can result in a strained relationship from which neither party sees a way out.
  • the future of mentor programs for faculty members should include outreach to midcareer professors
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Mentors and the Importance of Commitment - Research - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • "Mentoring" is in vogue, thanks in part to the Bush administration's emphasis on volunteerism.
  • The effects of mentoring are smaller than people think
  • But if you begin to control for the quality of the relationship, how long it lasts, the level of supervision, the kinds of kids who are recruited into the program, there are much larger effects.
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