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Matti Narkia

Berberine, dosing and safety - wellness.com - 0 views

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    Side Effects and Warnings
    Berberine has been reported to cause nausea, vomiting, hypertension (high blood pressure), respiratory failure and paresthesias (abnormal sensations such as numbness or tingling); however, clinical evidence of such adverse effects is not prominent in the literature. Rare adverse effects including headache, skin irritation, facial flushing, headache, bradycardia (slowed heart rate) have also been reported with the use of berberine. Use cautiously when taking berberine for longer than eight weeks due to theoretical changes in bacterial gut flora.
    Use cautiously in individuals with diabetes, as both human and animal studies indicate that berberine may decrease blood sugar levels. Also use cautiously in individuals with hypotension (low blood pressure), as berberine may have antihypertensive effects.
    Patients with cardiovascular disease should also use caution as berberine has been associated with the development of ventricular arrhythmias in subjects with congestive heart failure.
    Although not well studied in humans, berberine may also theoretically cause delays in small intestinal transit time or increase the risk of bleeding.
    Berberine may cause abortion, eye or kidney irritation, nephritis (inflamed kidneys), dyspnea (difficulty breathing), flu-like symptoms, giddiness, lethargy, or liver toxicity.
    Patients with leukopenia (abnormally low white blood cell count) should use cautiously due to the potential for development of leukopenia symptoms.
    When injected under the skin, berberine may cause hyperpigmentation in the arm. Use berberine cautiously in individuals with high exposure to sunlight or artificial light due to potential for adverse phototoxic reactions.
    Avoid in newborns due to potential for increase in free bilirubin, jaundice, and development of kernicterus (brain damage caused by severe newborn jaundice). Use berberine cautiously in children due to a lack of safety information.
    Pregnancy and Breastfeeding
    Berberine is not recomme
Matti Narkia

Developmental toxicity evaluation of berberine in rats and mice. Gloria D. Jahnke. 2006... - 0 views

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    Developmental toxicity evaluation of berberine in rats and mice.
    Jahnke GD, Price CJ, Marr MC, Myers CB, George JD.
    Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2006 Jun;77(3):195-206.
    PMID: 16634078
    DOI: 10.1002/bdrb.20075

    BACKGROUND: Berberine, a plant alkaloid, is found in some herbal teas and health-related products. It is a component of goldenseal, an herbal supplement. Berberine chloride dihydrate (BCD) was evaluated for developmental toxicity in rats and mice.
    METHODS: Berberine chloride dihydrate was administered in the feed to timed-mated Sprague-Dawley (CD) rats (0, 3625, 7250, or 14,500 ppm; on gestational days [GD] 6-20), and Swiss Albino (CD-1) mice (0, 3500, 5250, or 7000 ppm; on GD 6-17). Ingested doses were 0, 282, 531, and 1313 mg/kg/day (rats) and 0, 569, 841, and 1155 mg/kg/day (mice).
    RESULTS:There were no maternal deaths. The rat maternal lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL), based on reduced maternal weight gain, was 7250 ppm. The rat developmental toxicity LOAEL, based on reduced fetal body weight per litter, was 14,500 ppm. In the mouse study, equivocal maternal and developmental toxicity LOAELs were 5250 ppm. Due to scattering of feed in the high dose groups, a gavage study at 1000 mg/kg/day was conducted in both species.
    CONCLUSIONS: In rats, maternal, but not fetal adverse effects were noted. The maternal toxicity LOAEL remained at 7250 ppm (531 mg/kg/day) based on the feed study and the developmental toxicity NOAEL was raised to 1000 mg/kg/day BCD based on the gavage study. In the mouse, 33% of the treated females died. Surviving animals had increased relative water intake, and average fetal body weight per litter decreased 5-6% with no change in live litter size. The maternal toxicity LOAEL remained at 5250 ppm (841 mg/kg/day) BCD, based on increased water consumption. The developmental toxicity LOAEL was raised to 1000 mg/kg/day BCD based on decreased fetal body weight.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D and Cancer Mini-Symposium: The Risk of Additional Vitamin D - 0 views

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    Evidence from clinical trials shows, with a wide margin of confidence, that a prolonged intake of 10,000IU/d of vitamin D3 poses no risk of adverse effects for adults, even if this is added to a rather high physiologic background level of vitamin D.

    Vitamin D and cancer mini-symposium: the risk of additional vitamin D.
    Vieth R.\nAnn Epidemiol. 2009 Jul;19(7):441-5. Epub 2009 Apr 11.
    PMID: 19364661
    doi:10.1016/j.annepidem.2009.01.009
Matti Narkia

The immunobiology of mushrooms. - Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2008 Mar - 0 views

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    The immunobiology of mushrooms.
    Borchers AT, Krishnamurthy A, Keen CL, Meyers FJ, Gershwin ME.
    Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2008 Mar;233(3):259-76. Review.
    PMID: 18296732
    doi: 10.3181/0708-MR-227
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