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Borne Mace

The Psychology of Attention « PsyBlog - 0 views

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    There were several of the individual articles of this servies linked to the group. Here is the over arching article, with links to all of the individual articles inside of it, for the sake of completeness, in case of any of the individual articles were missed.
Jonathon Richter

18 Ways Attention Goes Wrong « PsyBlog - 0 views

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    When attention goes badly wrong it can play some nasty tricks on us. Imagine if every time you walked into a room with a neatly turned down bed, you
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    18 ways attention goes wrong
Manoj Chandrasekharan

The Secret of Walt Disney's Creativity - 0 views

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    Image by hyuku As a child, I remember being shocked to learn that Walt Disney was a person. To me, Disney was a mysterious entity, symbolised by the magical castle that appeared at the start of every film. A cross between fairyland and a faceless corporation. A bit like Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory. So it was hard to get my head around the idea that all those films were the brainchild of one man. Not to mention the theme parks. How could a single person be responsible for all of that? Later on, I discovered that the truth was even stranger. There wasn't just one Walt Disney. There were three. Here's the testimony of one of Disney's animators: there were actually three different Walts: the dreamer, the realist, and the spoiler. You never knew which one was coming into your meeting. (Ollie Johnstone and Frank Thomas, The Illusion of Life: Disney Animation) Robert Dilts uses this statement as the basis of a brilliant analysis of Walt Disney's creative process, in his book Strategies of Genius: Volume 1. He substitutes the word 'critic' for 'spoiler', giving three distinct roles that Disney played, each of which involved a particular type of thinking and action: The Dreamer - the visionary who dreamt up ideas for films and business ventures. The Realist - the pragmatic producer who made things happen. The Critic - the eagle-eyed evaluator who refined what the Dreamer and Realist produced. More important than the individual roles was Disney's ability to strike the right balance between them: Creativity as a total process involves the coordination of these three subprocesses: dreamer, realist and critic. A dreamer without a realist cannot turn ideas into tangible expressions. A critic and a dreamer without a realist just become stuck in a perpetual conflict. The dreamer and a realist might create things, but they might not achieve a high degree of quality without a critic. The critic helps to evaluate and refined the products of creativity. (Robert B. Dilts, Strategies
The Ravine / Joseph Dunphy

Mind Hacks: Ganzfeld hallucinations - 0 views

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    Mentioned on Digg.com and blogged about extensively, after its mention on Boston.com. Wonder if we're looking at a placebo effect, because I have difficulty believing that the tape over one's eyes wouldn't produce an extremely noticable sensation, and the alleged effect is supposedly a product of sensory deprivation.
The Ravine / Joseph Dunphy

Art as Visual Research: 12 Examples of Kinetic Illusions in Op Art: Scientific American... - 0 views

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    Illustory movement in static images, seen on the Scientific American website.
Joelle Nebbe-Mornod

This column will change your life: Should we hang out with people we don't like | Life ... - 0 views

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    The faintly depressing human tendency to seek out and spend time with those most similar to us is known in social science as "homophily", and it shapes our views, and our lives, in ways we're barely aware of. It explains why, if you know the political positions of a person's friends, you can predict their own with near certainty. It's also why, say, creationists imagine that the debate over evolution is an active and unresolved one: in their social circles, it is. We long to have our opinions confirmed, not challenged, and thus, as the Harvard media researcher Ethan Zuckerman puts it, "Homophily causes ignorance." (It also makes us more extreme, studies show: a group of conservatives, given the chance to discuss politics among themselves, will grow more conservative.) Even priding yourself on being open-minded is no defence if your natural, homophilic inclination is to hang out with other people like you, celebrating your love of diversity.
stelman encefalus

A new paradigm in cognitive science - 0 views

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    The current paradigm is cognitive science, based on lab experiments has started to show its age. Maybe what we really need is a new trend called Cognitive Ethology.
stelman encefalus

Dealing with the informational overflow - 1 views

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    The flow of information is becoming faster as information increases in volume. How can our cognitive system cope with this rythm and what can we do ourselves?
Caramel Crow

A Theory of Unconscious Thought - 1 views

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    See 8-17-2008 update
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