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Luciano Ferrer

The Tree of Languages Illustrated in a Big, Beautiful Infographic | Open Culture - 0 views

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    "Call it counterintuitive clickbait if you must, but Forbes' Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry made an intriguing argument when he granted the title of "Language of the Future" to French, of all tongues. "French isn't mostly spoken by French people and hasn't been for a long time now," he admits," but "the language is growing fast, and growing in the fastest-growing areas of the world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa. The latest projection is that French will be spoken by 750 million people by 2050. One study "even suggests that by that time, French could be the most-spoken language in the world, ahead of English and even Mandarin." I don't know about you, but I can never believe in any wave of the future without a traceable past. But the French language has one, of course, and a long and storied one at that. You see it visualized in the information graphic above (also available in suitable-for-framing prints!) created by Minna Sundberg, author of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent. "When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor," writes Mental Floss' Arika Okrent. "An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)." Sundberg takes this tree metaphor to a delightfully lavish extreme, tracing, say, how Indo-European linguistic roots sprouted a variety of modern-day living languages including Hindi, Portuguese, Russian, Italian - and, of course, our Language of the Future. The size of the branches and bunches of leaves represent the number of speakers of each language at different times: the likes of English and Spanish have sprouted into mighty vegetative clusters, while others, like, Swedish, Dutch, and Punjabi, assert a more local dominance over their own, separately grown regional branches. Will French's now-modest leaves one day cast a shadow over the w
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    "Call it counterintuitive clickbait if you must, but Forbes' Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry made an intriguing argument when he granted the title of "Language of the Future" to French, of all tongues. "French isn't mostly spoken by French people and hasn't been for a long time now," he admits," but "the language is growing fast, and growing in the fastest-growing areas of the world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa. The latest projection is that French will be spoken by 750 million people by 2050. One study "even suggests that by that time, French could be the most-spoken language in the world, ahead of English and even Mandarin." I don't know about you, but I can never believe in any wave of the future without a traceable past. But the French language has one, of course, and a long and storied one at that. You see it visualized in the information graphic above (also available in suitable-for-framing prints!) created by Minna Sundberg, author of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent. "When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor," writes Mental Floss' Arika Okrent. "An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)." Sundberg takes this tree metaphor to a delightfully lavish extreme, tracing, say, how Indo-European linguistic roots sprouted a variety of modern-day living languages including Hindi, Portuguese, Russian, Italian - and, of course, our Language of the Future. The size of the branches and bunches of leaves represent the number of speakers of each language at different times: the likes of English and Spanish have sprouted into mighty vegetative clusters, while others, like, Swedish, Dutch, and Punjabi, assert a more local dominance over their own, separately grown regional branches. Will French's now-modest leaves one day cast a shadow over the w
Carlos Pérez

Educación y Virtualidad: Educación e internet… mediadas por Vigotsky - 9 views

  • teoría sociocultural la mente opera indirectamente (mediación) gracias a la intervención de los medios auxiliares de origen cultural que se dan en condiciones sociales
  • aporte de la teoría socio cultural nos permite distinguir que el aprendizaje: Se origina y estimula dentro de un proceso de mediación extendido en una red de interrelaciones sociales. Se genera en virtud de la influencia y apropiación reconstructiva de los instrumentos de mediación cultural, del empleo de signos y herramientas.
  • No existe, por tanto, aprendizaje fuera de la red de interacciones sociales, ni ajena al ejercicio de la cultura… Esto también tiene que ver con Internet.
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Aprender en y con internet lleva el rasgo de la cultura digital y de las interacciones medidas tecnológicamente. 
  • la relación educación e Internet, siguiendo lo anterior, no hay que perder de vista que: Internet no es sólo un medio sofisticado, sino que configura un auténtico entorno de acción social que opera como condición y motor de aprendizaje. Internet no sólo integra aplicaciones, sino que aporta las herramientas operativas y simbólicas con que pensamos y actuamos, y con lo que reconstruimos la cultura.
  • Vigotsky “toda la actividad depende del material con el que opera” (2000, 129). Este punto es materia de otro desarrollo, aprendizaje con y de tecnología.
  • Internet ofrece un entorno social y dinamiza una práctica cultural donde se inscribe la vida de muchas personas y, con ello, sus oportunidades y limitaciones al momento de aprender. 
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    Aporte al aprendizaje social en la sociedad red
Luciano Ferrer

Small Changes in Teaching: The First 5 Minutes of Class - 0 views

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    "Open with a question or two. Another favorite education writer of mine, the cognitive psychologist Daniel Willingham, argues that teachers should focus more on the use of questions. "The material I want students to learn," he writes in his book Why Don't Students Like School?, "is actually the answer to a question. On its own, the answer is almost never interesting. But if you know the question, the answer may be quite interesting." My colleague Greg Weiner, an associate professor of political science, puts those ideas into practice. At the beginning of class, he shows four or five questions on a slide for students to consider. Class then proceeds in the usual fashion. At the end, he returns to the questions so that students can both see some potential answers and understand that they have learned something that day. What did we learn last time? A favorite activity of many instructors is to spend a few minutes at the opening of class reviewing what happened in the previous session. That makes perfect sense, and is supported by the idea that we don't learn from single exposure to material - we need to return frequently to whatever we are attempting to master.But instead of offering a capsule review to students, why not ask them to offer one back to you?Reactivate what they learned in previous courses. Plenty of excellent evidence suggests that whatever knowledge students bring into a course has a major influence on what they take away from it. So a sure-fire technique to improve student learning is to begin class by revisiting, not just what they learned in the previous session, but what they already knew about the subject matter.Write it down. All three of the previous activities would benefit from having students spend a few minutes writing down their responses. That way, every student has the opportunity to answer the question, practice memory retrieval from the previous session, or surface their prior knowledge - and not just the students most likely to
Luciano Ferrer

Paul's Extreme Sound Stretch - 0 views

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    "This is a program for stretching the audio. It is suitable only for extreme sound stretching of the audio (like 50x) and for applying special effects by "spectral smoothing" the sounds. It can transform any sound/music to a texture. The program is Open-Source and it's released under the version 2 of the General Public License. You can download the source code for Linux or the Windows binaries. Please note that this is suitable only for extreme time stretching (e.g. if have a melody of 3 minutes and you want to listen it in 3 hours). If you want "less extreme" time stretching, you can use a program which contains the SoundTouch library. Features It produces high quality extreme sound stretching. While most sound stretching software sounds bad when trying to stretch the sounds a lot, this one is optimized for extreme sound stretching. So, the stretch amount is unlimited. You can play the stretched sound in real-time (including the possibility to "freeze" the sound) or you can render the whole sound or a part of it to audio files It has many post-processing effects, like: filters, pitch/frequency shifters Support for WAV, OGG VORBIS files and MP3 files It is a Free Software "
Luciano Ferrer

Poverty Impedes Cognitive Function | Science - 0 views

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    "Burden of Poverty Lacking money or time can lead one to make poorer decisions, possibly because poverty imposes a cognitive load that saps attention and reduces effort. Mani et al. (p. 976; see the Perspective by Vohs) gathered evidence from shoppers in a New Jersey mall and from farmers in Tamil Nadu, India. They found that considering a projected financial decision, such as how to pay for a car repair, affects people's performance on unrelated spatial and reasoning tasks. Lower-income individuals performed poorly if the repairs were expensive but did fine if the cost was low, whereas higher-income individuals performed well in both conditions, as if the projected financial burden imposed no cognitive pressure. Similarly, the sugarcane farmers from Tamil Nadu performed these tasks better after harvest than before. Abstract The poor often behave in less capable ways, which can further perpetuate poverty. We hypothesize that poverty directly impedes cognitive function and present two studies that test this hypothesis. First, we experimentally induced thoughts about finances and found that this reduces cognitive performance among poor but not in well-off participants. Second, we examined the cognitive function of farmers over the planting cycle. We found that the same farmer shows diminished cognitive performance before harvest, when poor, as compared with after harvest, when rich. This cannot be explained by differences in time available, nutrition, or work effort. Nor can it be explained with stress: Although farmers do show more stress before harvest, that does not account for diminished cognitive performance. Instead, it appears that poverty itself reduces cognitive capacity. We suggest that this is because poverty-related concerns consume mental resources, leaving less for other tasks. These data provide a previously unexamined perspective and help explain a spectrum of behaviors among the poor. We discuss some implications for poverty policy."
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    "Burden of Poverty Lacking money or time can lead one to make poorer decisions, possibly because poverty imposes a cognitive load that saps attention and reduces effort. Mani et al. (p. 976; see the Perspective by Vohs) gathered evidence from shoppers in a New Jersey mall and from farmers in Tamil Nadu, India. They found that considering a projected financial decision, such as how to pay for a car repair, affects people's performance on unrelated spatial and reasoning tasks. Lower-income individuals performed poorly if the repairs were expensive but did fine if the cost was low, whereas higher-income individuals performed well in both conditions, as if the projected financial burden imposed no cognitive pressure. Similarly, the sugarcane farmers from Tamil Nadu performed these tasks better after harvest than before. Abstract The poor often behave in less capable ways, which can further perpetuate poverty. We hypothesize that poverty directly impedes cognitive function and present two studies that test this hypothesis. First, we experimentally induced thoughts about finances and found that this reduces cognitive performance among poor but not in well-off participants. Second, we examined the cognitive function of farmers over the planting cycle. We found that the same farmer shows diminished cognitive performance before harvest, when poor, as compared with after harvest, when rich. This cannot be explained by differences in time available, nutrition, or work effort. Nor can it be explained with stress: Although farmers do show more stress before harvest, that does not account for diminished cognitive performance. Instead, it appears that poverty itself reduces cognitive capacity. We suggest that this is because poverty-related concerns consume mental resources, leaving less for other tasks. These data provide a previously unexamined perspective and help explain a spectrum of behaviors among the poor. We discuss some implications for poverty policy."
Luciano Ferrer

EDpuzzle, agregar preguntas a videos, etc - 4 views

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    Make any video your lesson. Make it work for your unique classroom.
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    "The easiest way to engage your students with videos pick a video, add your magical touch and track your students' understanding Save time Take already existing videos from Youtube, Khan Academy, Crash Course, etc. or upload your own. Engage students easily Enable self-paced learning with interactive lessons, add your voice and questions along the video. Reinforce accountability Know if your students are watching your videos, how many times and see the answers they give."
Luciano Ferrer

ECO - Announcing A New World - Strange Loop Games - 0 views

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    "What does that mean exactly? It means you play in a multiplayer world that has the possibility of being permanently destroyed, resulting in server-wide perma death. What's more, the reason it's destroyed would be the players' own fault. It's not that different from our own world in that way. "This ecosystem is your only lifeline in a race against time." It works like this: a new server is started, and players enter at the beginnings of civilization. There's a world-destroying cataclysm looming, like a drought or a flood or a meteor heading for the Earth, several real-time weeks away. In order to prevent that catastrophe from happening, you need to build a civilization and advance technology and resources to the point that the crisis can be averted. However you're not alone in this world. Besides the other players, you'll be sharing the world with a detailed wilderness simulation full of plants and animals. They simulate 24 hours a day, living out their lives with or without human interaction, growing, feeding and reproducing. Together they form an ecosystem rich with resources, resources that you must use to survive and develop a civilization."
Luciano Ferrer

Close Reading and Argument Writing - Authentically Across the Curriculum - Guided Reading  and Reading Workshop - 0 views

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    "Close Reading and Argument Writing - Authentically Across the Curriculum 7/16/2015 0 Comments Close reading of informational texts and non-fiction articles is not - and should not be - reserved for language arts classes. Every content area would be immensely enhanced if science teachers, social studies teachers, physical education teachers, welding teachers, woodworking teachers (in other words, "all technical subjects," as Common Core states) would not push aside the textbook, but instead embrace it, along with content area and trade articles. Students would then simultaneously learn how to dissect the readings while gaining knowledge in these content areas. What often happens is that teachers feel that students can't handle the text books or can't read the articles independently - and often that is true. However, when teachers instead go into a survival mode, of sorts, and read aloud the whole chapter or article or summarize it with a slideshow, it ends up doing a disservice to students - students are not learning HOW to read these complex texts. They are not learning how to acquire the information on their own. They are not being given the skills to read the sometimes intricate information within a particular content area or even within their possible future trade. They are not being given the opportunity to read, understand, articulate, and discuss or even debate topics within their area of study. Teachers sometimes feel that they can't do these things with students because they are not language arts teachers, or because they don't have time, or simply because they don't know how. Alternatively, a simple solution is to let go of the control and let students do…..with the guidance called close reading. Close reading is a guided reading approach. It is guided because 1) the close reading strategy is reserved for complex texts that are often too high for students to be left with independently and 2) students don't use close reading strateg
Luciano Ferrer

Primitive Technology | Making stuff from scratch in the wild - 1 views

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    Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for. Also It should be noted that I don't live in the wild but just practice this as a hobby. I live in a modern house and eat modern food. I just like to see how people in ancient times built and made things. It is a good hobby that keeps you fit and doesn't cost anything apart from time and effort.
Luciano Ferrer

Una caminata a través del tiempo: una asombrosa experiencia para el bienvivir - 0 views

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    "Esta extensa cita que dejó escrita Carl Sagan y que posiblemente nos haya hecho sentir y pensar sobre nuestra vida, nuestra sociedad y nuestro planeta, es la antesala a un tercer paso, también importante, para una plena toma de conciencia de nuestro lugar en el mundo, experimentarlo. Einstein decía que la única fuente de conocimiento era la experiencia y una de las propuestas de este artículo es llevar a la experiencia personal esas sensaciones y pensamientos que nos ha transmitido Sagan con su reflexivo párrafo. La segunda propuesta es llevar esa experiencia a un nivel colectivo y para ello propongo desarrollarla como una posible actividad educativa y familiar a conveniencia del facilitador. A mi parecer, esta actividad encajaría perfectamente en la semana de la ciencia que se suele celebrar en diferentes localidades y países alrededor del 11 de noviembre, día mundial de la ciencia para la paz y el desarrollo. Un viaje de mil kilómetros comienza con un paso Hace unos días, coincidiendo con la semana de la ciencia, asistí a diversas actividades y en concreto una de ellas "Como descubrir a los mamíferos de nuestro entorno" ha sido el detonante de este artículo. Esta actividad familiar se desarrolló en el paisaje protegido de Elía y consistía en un pequeño paseo para descubrir huellas, rastros y señales de diferentes mamíferos como el jabalí, el gato montés, el zorro etc. Durante el pequeño paseo me vinieron a la memoria dos actividades parecidas y también realizadas en familia que experimenté cuando vivía en el Reino Unido. Una era sobre una caminata con un experto en forrajeo, búsqueda de plantas y recursos comestibles en la naturaleza. Durante ese paseo nos enseñó distintas plantas, su uso comestible o su posible uso medicinal. A lo largo del camino se probaron varias plantas y finalizó, para disfrute de los niños, en un claro del bosque con un pequeño fuego para cocinar un rebozado de dientes de león. La otra actividad ll
Luciano Ferrer

Raw, de los datos a las visualizaciones en simples pasos - 0 views

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    Muy interesante herramienta para pasar tablas de datos a visualizaciones gráficas, en vectores y personalizables... "RAW works with tabular data (i.e. information which is possible to record or track in a spreadsheet). There are many ways you can upload your data in RAW: Dropping a plain text file containing delimiter-separated values such as .csv or .tsv. File extension does not matter, as long as you use one of these delimters: comma, semicolon, tab or colon. Copying and pasting your data from a spreadsheet (e.g. Microsoft Excel, Google Docs, Apple Numbers...) or a text file. This is particularly helpful when you do not want to (or can not) export your data any time you change it or when you want to use only specific columns. Typing your data directly into the text area. While it is unlikely to use this option, it can be useful for editing your data."
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    Muy interesante herramienta para pasar tablas de datos a visualizaciones gráficas, en vectores y personalizables... "RAW works with tabular data (i.e. information which is possible to record or track in a spreadsheet). There are many ways you can upload your data in RAW: Dropping a plain text file containing delimiter-separated values such as .csv or .tsv. File extension does not matter, as long as you use one of these delimters: comma, semicolon, tab or colon. Copying and pasting your data from a spreadsheet (e.g. Microsoft Excel, Google Docs, Apple Numbers...) or a text file. This is particularly helpful when you do not want to (or can not) export your data any time you change it or when you want to use only specific columns. Typing your data directly into the text area. While it is unlikely to use this option, it can be useful for editing your data."
Luciano Ferrer

7 razones por las que las Nuevas Tecnologías te hacen mejor docente - 0 views

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    "1. Productividad. El buen uso de las Nuevas Tecnologías ha mejorado enormemente nuestra productividad. Continuamente salen nuevas herramientas sin otra finalidad que simplificar nuestro trabajo. De hecho, cuanto más dominemos estas herramientas, más productivos seremos. Con esto no quiero decir que cuanto más productivos seamos, más trabajaremos. En absoluto. Cuando me refiero a ser más productivo me refiero a que algunas tareas se han simplificado considerablemente y ello ha permitido que podamos gozar de un tiempo que antes no teníamos. Un tiempo que en mi caso, por ejemplo, dedico al aprendizaje de programas, aplicaciones, plataformas virtuales que mejoran día a día mis sesiones lectivas. A mayor productividad, mayor tiempo tendremos para nosotros. Luego cada uno decidirá cómo y en qué invertirlo. En muchas ocasiones los docentes caemos en el error de que aprender una herramienta nos va a implicar un tiempo que no tenemos y, personalmente, creo que este es un enfoque erróneo. Dominar las herramientas que utilizamos regularmente hace precisamente que podamos optimizar y gestionar mejor nuestro tiempo. Time is gold como me gusta decir a mí. 2. Aprendizaje. Las Nuevas Tecnologías han cambiado radicalmente nuestra forma de aprender así como nuestra forma de enseñar. Poco a poco hay una tendencia que está transformando el mensaje unidireccional del docente en un mensaje bidireccional en el que es el alumno el que aprende a aprender a través de los recursos que les facilitamos tanto dentro como fuera del aula. Hace poco oí una frase que decía algo así como que tenemos un sistema educativo del siglo XIX, con unos docentes del siglo XX que aplican unas tecnologías propias del siglo XXI. Pues bien, los docentes debemos dar un paso adelante e implementar plenamente el uso de las Nuevas Tecnologías en el aula. Sólo cuando lo llevemos a cabo será cuando empecemos a realizar una Educación verdaderamente revolucionaria, una revolución en la que
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    "1. Productividad. El buen uso de las Nuevas Tecnologías ha mejorado enormemente nuestra productividad. Continuamente salen nuevas herramientas sin otra finalidad que simplificar nuestro trabajo. De hecho, cuanto más dominemos estas herramientas, más productivos seremos. Con esto no quiero decir que cuanto más productivos seamos, más trabajaremos. En absoluto. Cuando me refiero a ser más productivo me refiero a que algunas tareas se han simplificado considerablemente y ello ha permitido que podamos gozar de un tiempo que antes no teníamos. Un tiempo que en mi caso, por ejemplo, dedico al aprendizaje de programas, aplicaciones, plataformas virtuales que mejoran día a día mis sesiones lectivas. A mayor productividad, mayor tiempo tendremos para nosotros. Luego cada uno decidirá cómo y en qué invertirlo. En muchas ocasiones los docentes caemos en el error de que aprender una herramienta nos va a implicar un tiempo que no tenemos y, personalmente, creo que este es un enfoque erróneo. Dominar las herramientas que utilizamos regularmente hace precisamente que podamos optimizar y gestionar mejor nuestro tiempo. Time is gold como me gusta decir a mí. 2. Aprendizaje. Las Nuevas Tecnologías han cambiado radicalmente nuestra forma de aprender así como nuestra forma de enseñar. Poco a poco hay una tendencia que está transformando el mensaje unidireccional del docente en un mensaje bidireccional en el que es el alumno el que aprende a aprender a través de los recursos que les facilitamos tanto dentro como fuera del aula. Hace poco oí una frase que decía algo así como que tenemos un sistema educativo del siglo XIX, con unos docentes del siglo XX que aplican unas tecnologías propias del siglo XXI. Pues bien, los docentes debemos dar un paso adelante e implementar plenamente el uso de las Nuevas Tecnologías en el aula. Sólo cuando lo llevemos a cabo será cuando empecemos a realizar una Educación verdaderamente revolucionaria, una revolución en la que
Luciano Ferrer

El Sistema Solar... a escala real - 0 views

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    "Las ilustraciones del sistema solar nunca evidencian a las claras su tamaño. Parece una cuestión cuántica: o los planetas están a escala o lo están las distancias, pero nunca ambos. Sería imposible. Por ello un grupo de seis amigos se dirigieron hacia el desierto de Navada, en Estados Unidos y contruyeron el primer modelo del sistema solar, con sus órbitas y a escala. En él la Tierra es una canica y el diámetro del conjunto completo es de unos 10 kilómetros. Aunque está en inglés, el vídeo se entiende perfectamente y destaca por dos factores: cada planeta está iluminado y se ve su órbota por la noche en time-lapse y al amanecer, el modelo del Sol, tiene el mismo tamaño que el astro rey que se alza por el universo. Un ejemplo de escala perfecto. On a dry lakebed in Nevada, a group of friends build the first scale model of the solar system with complete planetary orbits: a true illustration of our place in the universe. A film by Wylie Overstreet and Alex Gorosh"
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    "Las ilustraciones del sistema solar nunca evidencian a las claras su tamaño. Parece una cuestión cuántica: o los planetas están a escala o lo están las distancias, pero nunca ambos. Sería imposible. Por ello un grupo de seis amigos se dirigieron hacia el desierto de Navada, en Estados Unidos y contruyeron el primer modelo del sistema solar, con sus órbitas y a escala. En él la Tierra es una canica y el diámetro del conjunto completo es de unos 10 kilómetros. Aunque está en inglés, el vídeo se entiende perfectamente y destaca por dos factores: cada planeta está iluminado y se ve su órbota por la noche en time-lapse y al amanecer, el modelo del Sol, tiene el mismo tamaño que el astro rey que se alza por el universo. Un ejemplo de escala perfecto. On a dry lakebed in Nevada, a group of friends build the first scale model of the solar system with complete planetary orbits: a true illustration of our place in the universe. A film by Wylie Overstreet and Alex Gorosh"
Luciano Ferrer

Twitter y educación, ejemplos de uso e ideas. También podés colaborar. Por @_chrishaynes Et al - 0 views

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    1) the ways they currently implement Twitter in their teaching and learning, 2) ideas for future development of Twitter-based assignments and pedagogical practices, and 3) issues concerning the integration of Twitter and other digital media into both traditional and non-traditional pedagogies. Collaborators should feel free to add material to these pages, to comment on existing material, and to share links to relevant external readings and resources. It may be helpful to tag your contributions with your Twitter handle. Collaborators are asked to please respect this space as a forum for open and respectful dialogue and networking. Let's fill up the pages below with great ideas! Share the ways you currently implement Twitter in your teaching and learning: Students in my course New Information Technologies do an "Internet Censorship" project, focused on a specific country. I ask them to follow a journalist who tweets on that country as part of their research to understand the state of Internet freedom in the country they select. -- Lora Since shortly after Twitter was launched, I've experimented with various iterations of "The Twitter Essay," an assignment that has students considering the nature of the "essay" as a medium and how they might do that work within the space of 140 characters. -- Jesse (@Jessifer) In my fully online classes, I've started using Twitter to replace the discussion forum as the central location for student interaction. -- Jesse (@Jessifer) Show Tweets that have gotten people arrested and prompt discussion on whether it is fair that anyone be arrested for any Tweet in the US, who is likely to be arrested for their Tweets, what kinds of Tweets are likely to prompt arrest, etc. Students in my First Year Seminar course "The Irish Imagination: Yeats to Bono" developed a platform for digital annotation of Irish literature. Embedded in their platform was a twitter feed of relevant individuals/groups, m
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    1) the ways they currently implement Twitter in their teaching and learning, 2) ideas for future development of Twitter-based assignments and pedagogical practices, and 3) issues concerning the integration of Twitter and other digital media into both traditional and non-traditional pedagogies. Collaborators should feel free to add material to these pages, to comment on existing material, and to share links to relevant external readings and resources. It may be helpful to tag your contributions with your Twitter handle. Collaborators are asked to please respect this space as a forum for open and respectful dialogue and networking. Let's fill up the pages below with great ideas! Share the ways you currently implement Twitter in your teaching and learning: Students in my course New Information Technologies do an "Internet Censorship" project, focused on a specific country. I ask them to follow a journalist who tweets on that country as part of their research to understand the state of Internet freedom in the country they select. -- Lora Since shortly after Twitter was launched, I've experimented with various iterations of "The Twitter Essay," an assignment that has students considering the nature of the "essay" as a medium and how they might do that work within the space of 140 characters. -- Jesse (@Jessifer) In my fully online classes, I've started using Twitter to replace the discussion forum as the central location for student interaction. -- Jesse (@Jessifer) Show Tweets that have gotten people arrested and prompt discussion on whether it is fair that anyone be arrested for any Tweet in the US, who is likely to be arrested for their Tweets, what kinds of Tweets are likely to prompt arrest, etc. Students in my First Year Seminar course "The Irish Imagination: Yeats to Bono" developed a platform for digital annotation of Irish literature. Embedded in their platform was a twitter feed of relevant individuals/groups, m
Luciano Ferrer

Why schools shouldn't ban smartphones - 0 views

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    Artículo, en inglés, acerca de la utilización de móviles en el aula, etc... "Technology is like water to a fish. It surrounds us, and we rarely notice it, but we use it all the time. Instead of keeping children away from the water, we should teach them to swim. Any alternative would be unthinkable."
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    Artículo, en inglés, acerca de la utilización de móviles en el aula, etc... "Technology is like water to a fish. It surrounds us, and we rarely notice it, but we use it all the time. Instead of keeping children away from the water, we should teach them to swim. Any alternative would be unthinkable."
Francisco Gascón Moya

Wolfram|Alpha: Computational Knowledge Engine - 3 views

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    Increíble este buscador "respondetodo" Haz una pregunta - matemáticas, cálculos, conversiones, ciencias, geografía, vale casi todo - y, voilà, WolframAlpha te responde. Muy bueno. A continuación, un resumen en inglés. Free online access to the Wolfram|Alpha computational knowledge engine:answer questions; do math; instantly get facts, calculators, unit conversions, and real-time quantitative data and statistics; create plots and visualizations; and access vast scientific, technical, chemical, medical, health, business, financial, weather, geographic, dictionary, calendar, reference, and general knowledge-and much more.
Francisco Gascón Moya

100+ Google Tricks for Teachers - 9 views

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    From super-effective search tricks to Google tools specifically for education to tricks and tips for using Gmail, Google Docs, and Google Calendar, these tricks will surely save you some precious time.
Sònia Guilana

Generation Facebook - NYTimes.com - 0 views

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    interesante artículo del NY times sobre el uso de facebook y como los jóvenes viven en las redes sociales, cuando los profesores piden aún el anacrónico email. Hace falta colaborar para aprender mejor, y el diálogo profesorado-alumnado debe empezar por aquí
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