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Luciano Ferrer

Poverty Impedes Cognitive Function | Science - 0 views

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    "Burden of Poverty Lacking money or time can lead one to make poorer decisions, possibly because poverty imposes a cognitive load that saps attention and reduces effort. Mani et al. (p. 976; see the Perspective by Vohs) gathered evidence from shoppers in a New Jersey mall and from farmers in Tamil Nadu, India. They found that considering a projected financial decision, such as how to pay for a car repair, affects people's performance on unrelated spatial and reasoning tasks. Lower-income individuals performed poorly if the repairs were expensive but did fine if the cost was low, whereas higher-income individuals performed well in both conditions, as if the projected financial burden imposed no cognitive pressure. Similarly, the sugarcane farmers from Tamil Nadu performed these tasks better after harvest than before. Abstract The poor often behave in less capable ways, which can further perpetuate poverty. We hypothesize that poverty directly impedes cognitive function and present two studies that test this hypothesis. First, we experimentally induced thoughts about finances and found that this reduces cognitive performance among poor but not in well-off participants. Second, we examined the cognitive function of farmers over the planting cycle. We found that the same farmer shows diminished cognitive performance before harvest, when poor, as compared with after harvest, when rich. This cannot be explained by differences in time available, nutrition, or work effort. Nor can it be explained with stress: Although farmers do show more stress before harvest, that does not account for diminished cognitive performance. Instead, it appears that poverty itself reduces cognitive capacity. We suggest that this is because poverty-related concerns consume mental resources, leaving less for other tasks. These data provide a previously unexamined perspective and help explain a spectrum of behaviors among the poor. We discuss some implications for poverty policy."
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    "Burden of Poverty Lacking money or time can lead one to make poorer decisions, possibly because poverty imposes a cognitive load that saps attention and reduces effort. Mani et al. (p. 976; see the Perspective by Vohs) gathered evidence from shoppers in a New Jersey mall and from farmers in Tamil Nadu, India. They found that considering a projected financial decision, such as how to pay for a car repair, affects people's performance on unrelated spatial and reasoning tasks. Lower-income individuals performed poorly if the repairs were expensive but did fine if the cost was low, whereas higher-income individuals performed well in both conditions, as if the projected financial burden imposed no cognitive pressure. Similarly, the sugarcane farmers from Tamil Nadu performed these tasks better after harvest than before. Abstract The poor often behave in less capable ways, which can further perpetuate poverty. We hypothesize that poverty directly impedes cognitive function and present two studies that test this hypothesis. First, we experimentally induced thoughts about finances and found that this reduces cognitive performance among poor but not in well-off participants. Second, we examined the cognitive function of farmers over the planting cycle. We found that the same farmer shows diminished cognitive performance before harvest, when poor, as compared with after harvest, when rich. This cannot be explained by differences in time available, nutrition, or work effort. Nor can it be explained with stress: Although farmers do show more stress before harvest, that does not account for diminished cognitive performance. Instead, it appears that poverty itself reduces cognitive capacity. We suggest that this is because poverty-related concerns consume mental resources, leaving less for other tasks. These data provide a previously unexamined perspective and help explain a spectrum of behaviors among the poor. We discuss some implications for poverty policy."
Luciano Ferrer

Conflict-Free And Easy To Repair, The Fairphone Is The World's Most Ethical Phone | Co.Exist | ideas + impact - 0 views

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    "The Fairphone is a modular handset designed with repairability and ethical sourcing of its materials as headline features. It sold 60,000 units. Amazingly, for what sounds like a nerd-phone, almost half of those buyers had never owned a smartphone before. Now the Fairphone 2 is launching, and with a totally-new, in-house design. The new phone is even easier to repair, and because it was wholly designed by the FairPhone team, its supply chain is even more responsible than ever. The Fairphone is thicker than the latest iPhone or Samsung flagship, but that's the point. Instead of packing everything into a tiny case and keeping it there with glue, the Fairphone is designed to be taken apart. The lightweight magnesium frame supports modules that can be easily replaced by the user. "We have designed it with an aim to last three to five years, looking at making it robust and modular-for repairability," says Fairphone's chief communications officer, Tessa Wernink. "Obviously how long it lasts depends quite heavily on the user, so what we as a company are doing is offering an ecosystem around the phone that supports long-lasting use, first-hand or second-hand." Inside the case (itself one of several options) you'll find the core unit, containing all the chips and radios; a replaceable battery pack; a display that can be snapped off and replaced without any tools (not even a screwdriver); a receiver unit, which contains the front camera, sensors; the headset connector and microphones; a speaker/vibrator unit; and a camera module. These modules are designed to balance manufacturing complexity with repairability. For instance, the display comes as a standalone unit, but less-vulnerable components are bundled into one module. The camera, which people are most likely to upgrade as better versions become available, is also housed in its own module. That way you don't need to toss out your whole phone just to get a better camera. "In fact, the motto from the maker mo
Luciano Ferrer

phpList - How to include a custom subscribe form - 1 views

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    " New Page 2 <!-- newsletter subscribe below here --> Email:
    Name: <!-- newsletter subscribe ends here --> "
Luciano Ferrer

FooPlot | Online graphing calculator and function plotter - 2 views

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    Graficador de funciones online
Luciano Ferrer

Moodle plugins directory: Sharing Cart - 1 views

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    "The Sharing Cart is a block for duplicating course items into a personal library and an easy way to move those Moodle resources and activities between multiple courses on your site. With just three clicks, the Sharing Cart copies and moves a single course item from one course to another. It copies without user data--similar to the "Import" function in Course Administration. From version 2.3, user content in Forums, Wikis, Glossaries and Databases can optionally be included. In addition, items can be collected and saved on the Sharing Cart indefinitely, serving as a library of frequently used course items available for duplication. The Sharing Cart is viewable only by teachers, course creators and administrators."
Luciano Ferrer

Choice Eliminator 2 - G Suite Marketplace - 0 views

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    "Choice Eliminator will eliminate options from a multiple-choice, list, or checkbox type of question. Choice Eliminator is designed for light use only, and may be unreliable when multiple people are taking the form at the same time. Use Dropdown type of questions instead of multiple choice for better reliability. Choice Eliminator will eliminate options from a multiple-choice, dropdown, or checkbox type of question. Great for signing up for time slots or having students choose topics without doubling up. Version 2 uses spreadsheet functions to keep the results up-to-date, besides being more reliable when using limits, this allows you to restore eliminated choices and set the order."
Luciano Ferrer

Cómo funcionan los relojes antiguos, incluyendo el «reloj nocturno» y otras maravillas de los curadores del Museo Británico - 1 views

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    "En este vídeo en concreto es Oliver Cooke, curador de horología (el «arte y ciencia de medir el tiempo», tampoco en el diccionario) quien explica el funcionamiento básico de los relojes antiguos, esos aparatos de baja tecnología (o alta tecnología para la época, todo depende de cómo se mire), que constan de cinco componentes básicos: energía, ruedas dentadas, mecanismos de escape, controlador e indicador. En este otro vídeo -que es a través de donde descubrí el esta colección- tiene otra estupenda explicación de cómo funcionaba un reloj nocturno datado hacia 1675. Lo cual es toda una curiosidad, porque en aquella época leer la hora por la noche no era trivial: no había luz eléctrica y muchas veces no era fácil acercarse con una vela a un gigantesco reloj de pared."
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