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Jeff Steely

Micro assessing: Library impact story logs - 1 views

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    Interesting idea...
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    I love this idea!
sha towers

Organizing the liaison role: a concept map (Judith E. Pasek) - 0 views

  • Building relationships with STEM faculty and students therefore requires an active outreach approach rather than simply waiting for individuals to contact librarians.
  • meeting faculty informally and face-to-face at departmental functions is a key outreach strategy, and that outreach techniques need to be tailored to fit the local academic community, adapted for departmental variation.
  • Being visible means creating opportunities for communication by being present where your “customers” (i.e., faculty and students) are located
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  • variety of options for initiating interactions with potential customers
  • Being relevant requires currency and an understanding of the subject matter of interest to the customer.
  • keeping current with rapid changes in technology, research directions, curriculum offerings, and scholarly trends
  • For student engagement, it means making an effort to connect to their experiences and interests to add meaning and put learning processes into context.
  • Being useful means matching resources and information to the purpose (e.g., research, coursework) and needs of the customer
  • High-quality service also involves anticipating needs and being proactive in providing services
  • Faculty are pressed for time, so offering services that can save them time can win their respect and support.
  • Timeliness means being responsive and prompt in answering questions and scheduling consultations. It also means providing services at the point of need, timing delivery to when information and services are most needed or effective.
  • The four elements of proactive customer service—visibility, relevance, usefulness, and timeliness—are interrelated and of equal importance in the implementation of liaison services.
  • The liaison concept map is meant to be a starting point for organizing and planning activities that facilitate greater connections with academic faculty and students.
  • Becoming an effective liaison librarian in today’s environment involves moving from a role peripheral to academic research and teaching, to a more integral and integrated presence within departments and programs
  • Faculty satisfaction with library liaisons increases when they have recent and direct communication, they know the name of their assigned liaison librarian, and they receive more types of services.4
  • Engaging faculty and building long-term relationships can be enhanced by shifting focus to showing interest in their research, offering newer research services (e.g., data management and repository support), and identifying opportunities for partnership.
  • While developing relationships with individual faculty members is essential, the process of making initial contacts can be orchestrated at the departmental level.
  • Building awareness of library services is a necessary first step to engagement, as faculty tend not to view librarians as instructors or research consultants
  • Keeping up with trends and adding to the liaison librarian toolkit are essential to remaining relevant and effective
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    concept map for thinking about the various pieces of the liaison librarian role, focusing on visibility, relevance, usefulness, and timeliness. used for conversation with team of librarians to take a higher altitude view of what we're trying to accomplish and then specifically how we go about doing that
sha towers

In the Library with the Lead Pipe » What Is Digital Humanities and What's it ... - 0 views

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    this is a must read! gold mine of important ideas and challenges for where we need to put our attention  /st
Jeff Steely

Humanizing Academic Citation - Lingua Franca - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

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    Practical approach!
sha towers

Being Essential Is Not Enough, Part 2 | Peer to Peer Review - lj.libraryjournal.com - 0 views

  • Solving a problem that already exists for your faculty (such as compliance with a mandate) is more likely to generate support for the library than trying to convince the faculty that they have a problem.
  • Listen also for areas of emphasis that you might not think of as relevant to the library.
  • Sometimes aligning your library with institutional goals and programs means creating new services, and sometimes it means adapting old ones. Since our host institutions are always changing, it always means responding quickly and nimbly to new programs and priority shifts.
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  • Instead, she worked with her leadership team to create a two-part document: the first section outlined the library’s significant achievements over the past year, and the second explained what we want to do in the coming year.
  • the message our vice president received was not “Here are all the reasons why you ought to give the library more money.” Instead, it was “Here are some of the most important ways in which the library is moving the university towards its goals, and here are ways in which we could do that even better if we had more resources to work with.”
  • Thus, the message our vice president received was not “Here are all the reasons why you ought to give the library more money.” Instead, it was “Here are some of the most important ways in which the library is moving the university towards its goals, and here are ways in which we could do that even better if we had more resources to work with.”
  • Map your library’s programs and services to the mission of the university and you will be seen as an essential strategic partner, not just another piece of costly infrastructure.
  • Takeaway lesson: Map your library’s programs and services to the mission of the university and you will be seen as an essential strategic partner, not just another piece of costly infrastructure.
  • Solving a problem that already exists for your faculty (such as compliance with a mandate) is more likely to generate support for the library than trying to convince the faculty that they have a problem.
  • offering dedicated collaboration space for use by faculty working in those clusters, reaching out to the clusters with targeted information about existing technology offerings in the libraries, and “providing dedicated subject specialists for each faculty cluster to work across the life-cycle of their research to offer guidance and connections to services
  • Sometimes aligning your library with institutional goals and programs means creating new services, and sometimes it means adapting old ones. Since our host institutions are always changing, it always means responding quickly and nimbly to new programs and priority shifts.
  • Listen also for areas of emphasis that you might not think of as relevant to the library.
  • ask yourself what the library might do differently (or what it might already be doing) that could have an impact on that goal, even if the goal doesn’t seem to be connected directly to library services.
  • ask yourself what the library might do differently (or what it might already be doing) that could have an impact on that goal
  • , even if the goal doesn’t seem to be connected directly to library services.
  • not just what your campus leaders and spokespersons say, but how often and in how many contexts they say it that will tip you off to a particularly important or emerging area of institutional focus
  • It’s not just what your campus leaders and spokespersons say, but how often and in how many contexts they say it that will tip you off to a particularly important or emerging area of institutional focus
  • If the library is doing things that don’t help further the goals and strategies laid out in them, ask yourself why—and unless the answers you come up with are unusually compelling and can be defended (with a straight face) in conversation with your provost or vice president, seriously consider discontinuing them. If your library is doing things that actively undermine those goals and strategies, stop doing those things immediately. As you consider establishing new programs or practices in your library, ask yourself from the very beginning how those new programs or practices will help further the strategic mission of your institution.
  • If the library is doing things that don’t help further the goals and strategies laid out in them, ask yourself why—and unless the answers you come up with are unusually compelling and can be defended (with a straight face) in conversation with your provost or vice president, seriously consider discontinuing them.
  • your library is doing things that actively undermine those goals and strategies, stop doing those things immediately. As you consider establishing new programs or practices in your library, ask yourself from the very beginning how those new programs or practices will help further the strategic mission of your institution.
  • no library that aligns itself to institutional priorities will end up serving all programs and all academic disciplines equally
  • our budgets and programmatic support should not be distributed equally across disciplines, but should reflect the curricular and strategic emphases of our host institutions.
  • means your monitoring of institutional communications for strategic hints will have to be sensitive to nuance
Jeff Steely

CURQuarterly : Scaffolding the Development of Students' Research Skills for Capstone Ex... - 0 views

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    Interesting article. UNLV Libraries are engaged in similar curricular mapping work.
sha towers

This article relates to… - chroniclevitae.com - 1 views

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    "It's also not the only way to build institutional unity. What if instead of devoting time and resources to making analogies about customer service, we put learning first? What if the conversations, the trainings, the memos, and even the job descriptions emphasized this simple question: How does what I do make this a better place for students to learn and develop?"
Jeff Steely

Trends in Digital Scholarship Centers (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu - 0 views

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    "Looking back over the past 18 months, we have four observations. First, we have learned the critical importance of clearly defining the Sherman Centre's scope and purpose for the campus community. Understanding of digital scholarship's boundaries is still relatively low on all of our campuses. Work in the center falls outside traditional norms for how research is done - the norm being that research is a solitary activity, with no "bumping around" required. In terms of libraries, it is definitely outside the norm. Libraries are traditionally very transaction-based: we count the number of people who enter our doors, ask us research help questions, and attend instruction sessions. We have no mental model for tracking activity within a digital scholarship center, which is inherently more relationship-based.

    Second, we've learned that the relentless demand for physical space on campus creates pressure on our new center. Faculty members and graduate students are always looking for a place to run their experiments and relocate their staff. We often find ourselves having to turn people away when their work is not advancing the digital scholarship agenda. Saying no is not easy, but it must be done to protect the center's integrity.

    Third, we've learned of the vital need for patience - both individual and organizational. Digital scholarship centers are not created in a day or even in 18 months. Building a good center requires patience on the part of our senior university administrators, faculty, and staff. A digital scholarship program is built on relationships, as well as on the careers of its scholars. Centers evolve as junior faculty members incorporate digital scholarship into their research and then rise to become senior scholars.

    Finally, we've discovered the strong need for training and mentorship opportunities on our campus. Our graduate students (like any other graduate students) do not enter their programs with deep digital scholarship skills, but they are e
Jeff Steely

Digital humanities and the future of technology in higher ed. - 0 views

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    I love the final paragraph "Another way of putting that is: Do not spend eight years getting a doctorate with the sole purpose of becoming digital humanist, as you would be better off just learning to code and getting a job as a software engineer. However, if you have already made the unwise choice to enroll in a humanities Ph.D. program, one way to salvage what will otherwise be your eventual entrée onto a jobless hellscape might be to "disrupt" your Eliot (George, T.S., whichever) and start using technology to analyze, distribute, or supplement your research. The worst possible outcome, after all, will be that more than three people read your work."
Ellen Filgo

FLIP THE MODEL (a pre-print) - The Ubiquitous Librarian - The Chronicle of Higher Educa... - 2 views

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    ""Academic libraries are encountering a critical inflection point. In our case it isn't a single technology that is disrupting our established system, but a barrage of advancements in publishing, pedagogy, and user preferences. The landscape is shifting around us, and the future of scholarship requires us to develop new skills, design new environments, and deliver new service capacities. In short, we need new operating models.""
Jeff Steely

» A Librarian's Guide to OpenRefine ACRL TechConnect Blog - 0 views

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    This looks like it could be very useful for manipulating large data sets.
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