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Felipe de Jesus Garciasantana

Pearson's "Free" LMS - 0 views

  • Many schools are rethinking the LMS, not just because these tools have cost them a pretty penny, but because they're looking for ways that can further student collaboration and that can emphasize content and learning and not just administration. That could put Pearson in a good position to be a go-to tool for schools, particularly if the focus becomes content, something Pearson does hold market control over. As the Delta Initiative's Phil Hill told Inside Higher Ed, Pearson "wants to change the perception of an LMS to [make colleges] say: �Hey, that's a commodity, that's a delivery system � and really education, and the education system, needs to be about the content itself and how students interact with that content.'"
    • Felipe de Jesus Garciasantana
       
      Learning Management Sistem educational tools
  • drian Sannier, senior vice president of product at Pearson, told Inside Higher Ed that the new OpenClass can be used absolutely for free. No licensing costs, no costs for maintenance, and no costs for hosting. So this is a freer offer than Moodle is. It's a freer offer than any other in the space. And from the email I received from the PR firm handling the announcement, I give you these gems: "Pearson Launches First Truly Free and Open Learning Platform for Higher Ed." The tool "Provides Open Access." And this is where we need to stop and scrutinize what's happening here and look past the invocations of "free" and "open." Why would Pearson offer a free LMS? For one thing, Pearson doesn't need to sell OpenClass. Its emphasis -- indeed, its strategy -- lies elsewhere. Pearson is the largest education company in the world -- with or without success in the LMS market -- with profits of �208 million for the first half of this year alone. Its educational sales are up 9%; it's educational profits are up 31%. Much those sales and profits come from educational content: textbooks -- both print and digital -- as well as other curriculum offerings. (Much of the profits come from assessment products and services too -- Pearson sells the textbooks and the standardized tests. That's pretty damn lucrative, clearly.) Pearson can give away OpenClass in the hopes that schools will go for the "up-sell" and buy the company's other offerings. Many schools are rethinking the LMS, not just because these tools have cost them a pretty penny, but because they're looking for ways that can further student collaboration and that can emphasize content and learning and not just administration. That could put Pearson in a good position to be a go-to tool for schools, particularly if the focus becomes content, something Pearson does hold market control over. As the Delta Initiative's Phil Hill told Inside Higher Ed, Pearson "wants to change the perception of an LMS to [make colleges] say: �Hey, that's a commodity, that's a delivery system � and really education, and the education system, needs to be about the content itself and how students interact with that content.'" For its part, Pearson says that it's not going to lock users in to using just its content. But I can't help but wonder if that's true. After all, I think we need to question its usage of adjectives like "free" and "open" here. Furthermore when a company touts Google's involvement when really, what we have here is just a fairly simple and straight-forward integration with Google Apps, we should be a little suspicious about the labeling and the marketing and our consumption habits. More Sharing ServicesShare | Share on twitter Share on facebook Share on gmail Share on diigo var addthis_config = {"data_track_clickback":true}; Tags: <a href
  • Adrian Sannier, senior vice president of product at Pearson, told Inside Higher Ed that the new OpenClass can be used absolutely for free. No licensing costs, no costs for maintenance, and no costs for hosting. So this is a freer offer than Moodle is. It's a freer offer than any other in the space. And from the email I received from the PR firm handling the announcement, I give you these gems: "Pearson Launches First Truly Free and Open Learning Platform for Higher Ed." The tool "Provides Open Access
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    So interesting "No licemsing costs, no costs for maintenance, and no costs for hosting. So this is freer offer than Moodle is...than any other in the space" really?
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