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Contents contributed and discussions participated by John Evans

John Evans

Adventures in Library: Portable Green Screens in the Library - 0 views

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    "Earlier in the school year my students created whole-class videos using our large green screen studio. While I assigned students a variety of tasks (director, camera operator, acting coach), my students spent the majority of their time on the carpet as an audience member. At the end of these units I wondered how we could increase student ownership of the production. Could I have my students create a green screen movie without having to play the audience member for large portions of the time? Could they be empowered to create a movie independently of the teacher? Could this be done by kindergartners and first graders?


    For most of the school year I struggled with these questions. That was until I met Brenda Windsor and Mary O'Neil of Trumbull, CT at the Fairfield University "Education Technology Collaboration Day" in March.  Brenda and Mary presented on how they have incorporated green screens in the classroom, and shared the idea of using a pizza box to make a miniature portable studio. Here is a link to the video they created.  From that moment, I was on a mission to have my K-2 students write, direct, film & star in their own collaborative group mini green screen movies.

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John Evans

Alternative Limb Project Offers Children Cheap 3D Printed Prosthetics | All3DP - 0 views

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    "8-year-old Kaori Misue was born without fingers. Usually, creating specialized prosthetics costs upwards of $15,000. However, thanks to a 21-year-old inventor, Misue received a prosthetic hand which has changed her life.

    Gino Tubaro is offering kids born without limbs the chance to receive a cheap 3D printed prosthetic. Misue's mother, Karina Misue, adds: "It was magical… The confidence it gives kids is tremendous. They're using it with pride."

    Tubaro's 3D printed prosthetic designs are part of the "Alternative Limbs Project", which began in his home of Argentina. The prints come in a range of designs, offering users the chance to decide what they need the prosthetic for most, whether it's playing an instrument or ping-pong. The prosthetics for kids can even be superhero themed (and shoot rubber bands)."
John Evans

50 Cool Things to 3D Print Which Are Actually Useful | All3DP - 0 views

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    "Like us, you're tremendously excited by the possibilities of 3D printing. Unfortunately, the landscape is cluttered with trinkets, doodads and ornaments. We're in danger of drowning in 3D printed objects that nobody wants or needs.

    Fight the tide of mediocrity! Let's make stuff that's actually useful! Here's a list of cool things to 3D print, right now, today. Prove to your nearest and dearest that there's an everyday and practical application of this wonderful technology."
John Evans

NMC/CoSN Horizon Report > 2017 K-12 Edition | The New Media Consortium - 2 views

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    "The NMC/CoSN Horizon Report > 2017 K-12 Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) and made possible by mindSpark Learning (formerly known as Share Fair Nation).

    The preview provides summaries of the trends, challenges, and important developments in educational technology which were ranked most highly by the 2017 expert panel and will be featured in the official NMC/CoSN Horizon Report > 2017 K-12 Edition set to be released in August, 2017. View the Panel of Expert's work and discussions in the 2017 Horizon.k12 Workspace."
John Evans

Seen a fake news story recently? You're more likely to believe it next time - Journalis... - 0 views

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    ""Pope Francis Shocks World, Endorses Donald Trump for President"; "ISIS Leader Calls for American Muslim Voters to Support Hillary Clinton."

    These examples of fake news are from the 2016 presidential election campaign. Such highly partisan fabricated stories designed to look like real reporting probably played a bigger role in that bitter election than in any previous American election cycle. The fabrications spread on social media and into traditional news sources in a way that tarnished both major candidates' characters.

    Sometimes the stories intentionally damage a candidate; sometimes the authors are driven only by dollar signs.

    Questions about how and why voters across the political spectrum fell for such disinformation have nagged at social scientists since early in the 2016 race. The authors of a new study address these questions with cognitive experiments on familiarity and belief."
John Evans

5 Reasons To Carry Out A Project This Term | @TeacherToolkit - 0 views

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    "Projects can enhance the curriculum that you teach, encourage logical thinking skills and promote cross-curricular links. Pupils work in a similar style to how they would in the workplace, collaborating with their peers and supporting one another."
John Evans

Wow In the World: A New NPR Podcast for Curious Kids and their Grown-Ups : NPR - 1 views

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    ""Wow in the World is a place where we can tap into the crazy cool things that are happening all around us, every day!" says Thomas. "We want to help spark conversations between kids and other kids and also with their grown-ups that will ultimately lead to their own big discoveries."

    Each episode begins with a series of questions that lead to an explanation about a new amazing scientific discovery or finding. For example, "How long would it take to get to the closest star outside our solar system?" or "How did we Homo sapiens come to dominate the planet?" or "How do astronauts poop in space?" Through comedy and conversation, along with voices from real kids, Mindy and Guy make the news fun and interesting.

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John Evans

This Computer Language Is Feeding Hacker Values into Young Minds | WIRED - 0 views

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    "Last year, I went to Nigeria with Mark Zuckerberg. One of the first stops on the trip was a program that taught kids how to code. When Zuckerberg entered the room, many of the young students had a hard time pulling themselves away from their projects, even to gawk at one of the world's richest men. Facebook's founder instead came to them. "What are you making?" he'd ask. And they would proudly say, "A game!" or whatever it was, and begin showing him how it works. Zuckerberg would stop them. "Show me the code!" he'd say, because, well, he's Zuckerberg, and any occasion is ripe for an ad hoc programming review. And that's when the kid would click on a menu that toggled from the game to the LEGO-like building blocks of a Scratch program.
    This happened several times, with kids ranging from ages 8 to 15. In every instance, the maker of a cool project could clearly show this famous visitor how he or she had methodically implemented a plan. Zuckerberg was clearly impressed. As we headed up the stairs to leave the building, Zuckerberg called out to me, "Scratch! Have you heard of this?"
    Oh, yes I had. Though it was not yet released to the world when Zuckerberg left Harvard to launch his quirky little startup, Scratch (developed just a couple of T stops away) is quickly becoming the world's most popular computer language for kids taking their first bite of programming. Last year, over 120 million people came to its site, and many of them built and shared projects, at a rate of a million a month. "It's the gateway drug for Silicon Valley engineering," says Fred Wilson of Union Square Ventures, a Scratch supporter."
John Evans

Can this $14 matchbox-sized device fire up America's kids to get coding? - TechRepublic - 0 views

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    "A matchbox-sized, programmable device launches in the US and Canada today, aimed at offering children a gentle introduction to the world of computers.

    Already used in schools across the UK, the BBC micro:bit is designed to make it easy for kids to write simple programs to control the board's hardware, with creations to date including basic games and animations.

    The device packs a 25 LED matrix display, a motion sensor, accelerometer and two buttons onto a tiny 4cmx5cm board. It can be programmed using easy-to-grasp tools, such as the drag-and-drop programming environment Scratch, or if the user is more confident, by coding in a variety of languages, including JavaScript or MicroPython."
John Evans

Your Guide To The Raspberry Pi - 0 views

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    "In early 2012, the Raspberry Pi Foundation released a $35 computer and the internet went wild (ok, a very small, mostly tech bloggy part). This was the Raspberry Pi 1, Model B. Originally only for the educational market in the U.K., it quickly became a must-have, DIY device around the world.

    Was it the first, tiny single board computer? Far from it. Could you use it out of the box? Nope. For any of its shortcomings, the Raspberry Pi has thrived not only due to its affordability but also because of a global community of passionate teachers, tinkerers and professionals who've taken the time to support and share their knowledge-and love-for this little board.

    In this article, I'll discuss the Raspberry Pi basics so you can start your own DIY computing journey. What is the Raspberry Pi? An electronic tool that you can play with, so let's get to playing."
John Evans

Scribbler DUO: The World's First Dual-Nozzle 3D Printing Pen by Scribbler 3D Pen - Kick... - 0 views

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    "Our Dual-Nozzle Scribbler 3D Pen takes it to another level! With multiple new functions to help take your creativity to the moon."
John Evans

Edutech for Teachers » Blog Archive » The Weekly Edtech Smackdown: Vol. X - 0 views

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    "Welcome to the weekly edition of The Edtech Smackdown-a collection of digital resources containing a few of my most favorite activities, tools and articles curated from various social media spaces throughout the past week.

    Check out some super cool edtech gems right here, right now and get ready to use these ideas to support learning and to engage students in your classroom!"
John Evans

Science Says Art Will Make Your Kids Better Thinkers (and Nicer People) - 0 views

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    "A new study supports our hunch that kids who are exposed to the arts gain benefits beyond just being "more creative."

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John Evans

Fulfilling the Maker Promise: Year One - Digital Promise - 1 views

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    "During the 2016 National Week of Making, as a part of President Obama's Nation of Makers initiative, Digital Promise and Maker Ed announced the Maker Promise. A commitment made by school leaders, in-school and out-of-school educators, and community advocates to bringing quality making experiences to all students. By signing the Promise, individuals commit to becoming champions of making, supporting spaces for making, and showcasing what students have made. As this year's Week of Making comes to a close, we are excited to publish our first annual Maker Promise report, which shares what we have learned about the state of making in schools and how this is shaping our future efforts.
    This year, our work focused on understanding how maker learning is being implemented at Maker Promise schools and identifying areas where the Maker Promise could offer support and resources. To develop our understanding, we interviewed K-12 school leaders who had signed the Maker Promise and surveyed the "maker champions" most responsible for integrating making into their school or district. Here are a few highlights from our findings:"
John Evans

How much caffeine is in Red Bull, Starbucks, coffee, tea, soda? - Business Insider - 1 views

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    "And you thought Red Bull was bad.

    It turns out that while a can of the energy drink has 80 milligrams of caffeine, a small cup of Starbucks drip coffee has more than three times that amount.

    Since many beverages don't show their caffeine content, it can be tough to make sure you're not overdoing it - and the Mayo Clinic advises adults to limit their caffeine intake to 400 mg per day. More than that and you run the risk of unpleasant side effects ranging from migraine headaches to irritability, upset stomach, and even muscle tremors"
John Evans

How much caffeine is in Red Bull, Starbucks, coffee, tea, soda? - Business Insider - 1 views

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    "And you thought Red Bull was bad.

    It turns out that while a can of the energy drink has 80 milligrams of caffeine, a small cup of Starbucks drip coffee has more than three times that amount."
John Evans

9 Ways to Inspire Student Inventors | Edutopia - 1 views

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    "There's an old saying that the things that change your life are the books you read, the places you go, and the people you meet. But I'd like to add a fourth: the challenges you face (and how you face them) will always change your life. If we want our students to respond to challenges with creativity and inventiveness, we must create the conditions in which innovation is not only possible but encouraged. You don't help students learn to invent by giving worksheets or cookie-cutter assignments. In fact, these one-size-fits-all approaches may actually take up the time that could be used for such creativity.

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John Evans

3D Printed House - World's 35 Greatest 3D Printed Structures | All3DP - 2 views

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    "3D printing has been used to build houses, cabins, offices, bridges, pavilions, large-scale structures, and much more. Even though they only existed for a handful of years, there are a vast number of completed projects, ongoing construction jobs, and unique concepts that are driving the industry today. Before we get started with the greatest 3D printed houses and structures in the world, take a glance at the top five advantages that 3D printing can offer the construction industry."
John Evans

Reading Apprenticeship at WestEd - Downloadable Resources - 1 views

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    Downloadable resources from two books Leading for Literacy and Reading for Understanding
John Evans

The Tech Edvocate's 2017 List of 116 of the Best Teaching and Learning Apps - The Tech ... - 4 views

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    "Technology is changing the way we teach and learn at a rapid speed. So, how can teachers make learning more interactive and more fun with technology? True, teachers can make up games to teach a concept that involves every student. But, when teachers need to help students in small groups or one-on-one, how can they make sure that other students are actively practicing subject-area skills?

    One of the great aspects of having tablets, laptops, and desktops in the classroom is the availability educational apps. With these apps, students can individually learn, practice, study, and have fun with different subjects and concepts. Luckily, there are many good, quality apps for students of all ages. It is important to note that this list is separated into categories, and the apps in each category are not in rank ordered. Here are 116 of the best teaching and learning apps for 2017."
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