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Phil Taylor

Using Technology in the Early Childhood Classroom - 5 views

  • Modern technologies are very powerful because they rely on one of the most powerful genetic biases we do have — the preference for visually presented information
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    "Modern technologies are very powerful because they rely on one of the most powerful genetic biases we do have - the preference for visually presented information"
Phil Taylor

How Technology Trends Have Influenced the Classroom | MindShift - 4 views

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    "the greatest impact still lies within the teacher and the content that they are trying to get their students to learn."
Phil Taylor

Technology in the Classroom: Embrace the Bumpy Ride! - 1 views

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    "Technology in the Classroom: Embrace the Bumpy Ride!"
John Evans

It Is Not About the Gadgets - Why Every Teacher Should Have to Integrate Tech Into Thei... - 7 views

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    "I once sat on an interview committee in which the candidate proudly proclaimed that to integrate technology her students would use word processors and publish their work in a monthly book. My toes instantly curled. It wasn't so much that she had used the words "word processor" but rather that she thought tech integration meant to have students type on a computer and then publish their work, that that would make them ready for this century of jobs. So a couple of things come to mind whenever we discuss tech integration in schools."
Chelsea Wright

IPads in the classroom: The right way to use them, demonstrated by a Swiss school. - 8 views

  • The teachers cared most about how the devices could capture moments that told stories about their students’ experiences in school. Instead of focusing on what was coming out of the iPad, they were focused on what was going into it.
  • But most eye-opening, he said, is watching children have their own “aha” moments after watching recordings of themselves and talking to teachers about what they were thinking at the time.
  • Ten years ago, Stanford’s Larry Cuban noted that computers in the classroom were being oversold and underused. In short order, the iPad craze could take the same turn. My lesson from ZIS is that we should make sure we have teachers who understand how to help children learn from the technology before throwing a lot of money into iPad purchasing. It wasn’t the 600 iPads that were so impressive— it was the mindset of a teaching staff devoted to giving students time for creation and reflection. Are American public schools ready to recognize that it’s the adults and students around the iPads, not just the iPads themselves, that require some real attention?
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • The school has an unconventional take on the iPad’s purpose. The devices are not really valued as portable screens or mobile gaming devices. Teachers I talked to seemed uninterested, almost dismissive, of animations and gamelike apps. Instead, the tablets were intended to be used as video cameras, audio recorders, and multimedia notebooks of individual students’ creations. The teachers cared most about how the devices could capture moments that told stories about their students’ experiences in school. Instead of focusing on what was coming out of the iPad, they were focused on what was going into it.
  • The school has an unconventional take on the iPad’s purpose. The devices are not really valued as portable screens or mobile gaming devices. Teachers I talked to seemed uninterested, almost dismissive, of animations and gamelike apps. Instead, the tablets were intended to be used as video cameras, audio recorders, and multimedia notebooks of individual students’ creations. The teachers cared most about how the devices could capture moments that told stories about their students’ experiences in school. Instead of focusing on what was coming out of the iPad, they were focused on what was going into it.

    • Chelsea Wright
       
      This is an important point
  • Sam Ross, a second-grade teacher at ZIS, sees real potential in moments like this. “Children are being able to show what’s in their minds by adding the oral explanation,” he said. “That’s off-the-charts amazing.” Particularly helpful, he said, is to watch the recordings made by young children and English-language learners—students who may not speak up much in class but can actually show deep learning when asked to interview each other or record what they know. But most eye-opening, he said, is watching children have their own “aha” moments after watching recordings of themselves and talking to teachers about what they were thinking at the time.
  • In addition to Explain Everything, they include MyStory, iMovie, Animation HD, Google Earth, Book Creator, Show Me, Brushes, and Comic Life. They also feature Follett Reader and Overdrive, two subscription-based services to digital book collections.
John Evans

BYOT: The hidden messages | SmartBlogs SmartBlogs - 1 views

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    "BYOT worked so well in each of these cases for four reasons: we planned/prepared, were flexible, had an open discussion with students and did not tie ourselves to one platform or Internet access. The problem with integrating most technology is that schools and teachers rely too much on Internet access. We forget that even without the Internet, laptops and mobile devices are very powerful tools."
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