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John Evans

How Facebook's new 3D photos work | TechCrunch - 1 views

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    "In May, Facebook teased a new feature called 3D photos, and it's just what it sounds like. However, beyond a short video and the name, little was said about it. But the company's computational photography team has just published the research behind how the feature works and, having tried it myself, I can attest that the results are really quite compelling.

    In case you missed the tea"
John Evans

Free Technology for Teachers: Three Good Resources for Learning About the Science of Ba... - 1 views

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    "Watching a Red Sox game or listening to one on the radio is one of my favorite things to do on a warm summer night like we're having tonight in Maine. During the pregame show this evening the broadcasters were talking about the launch angle of some of the homeruns hit by Red Sox players this year. That discussion of launch angle triggered my memory of some resources that I've shared over the years regarding the math and science of baseball.
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John Evans

K12 students code beyond computers | District Administration Magazine - 0 views

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    "How do you ensure students who excel at math remain engaged? Heidi Williams intended to solve that challenge by starting an after-school coding club while she was a gifted-and-talented teacher at Bayside Middle School near Milwaukee.

    Instead of using pen and paper, her students created an interactive children's book on Scratch, the MIT Media Lab coding suite that lets users create games, stories and simulations. And the more of this kind of coding activity they did, the better their math test scores got.

    Now a computer science curriculum specialist at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Williams researches this correlation. One possibility is that the computational thinking skills developed while coding help students break down complicated problems-on and off computers, she says."
John Evans

In Finland, Teaching Computer Science Without Computers - The Atlantic - 3 views

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    "The Finns are pretty bemused by Americans' preoccupation with whether to put iPads in every classroom. If a tablet would enhance learning, great. If it wouldn't, skip it. Move on. The whole thing is a little tilting-at-windmills, anyway.

    That was the gist of the conversation one recent morning at the Finnish Embassy in Washington, D.C., where diplomats and experts gathered to celebrate the country's education accomplishments as Finland turns 100. And Americans could stand to take notes. (Yes, from Finland-again.)

    Coding and programming are now part of the curriculum in the Scandinavian country, and they're subjects kids tackle from a young age. But unlike in some parts of the United States where learning to code is an isolated skill, Finnish children are taught to think of coding and programming more as tools to be explored and utilized across multiple subjects."
John Evans

University of Waterloo program aims to reverse women's flight from computer science - T... - 0 views

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    "When Joanne Atlee was an undergraduate student in computer science, more than a third of her class was made up of women. In graduate school, those ranks began to thin out, a decline that has continued through much of her career as a professor at the University of Waterloo.

    "All of a sudden I am an instructor at Waterloo and 10 per cent of the class is female and it's 'Oh no, what happened?'""
John Evans

30 Best Science Websites for Kids (Chosen by Teachers) - 3 views

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    "What are the best science websites for your K-12 lessons? Here are the ones I turn to again and again."
John Evans

Science Infographics Breakdown STEM Subjects as Visual Maps - 1 views

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    "It's often easy to get stuck into a narrow view of what a particular field of study entails, but as Dominic Walliman reveals in his impressive science infographics, there's much more than meets the eye when thinking of particular STEM subjects. Walliman demonstrates the diversity and complexity of biology, chemistry, computer science, physics, and mathematics in visual maps that explore the breadth of each field.

    Walliman, who also created animated videos exploring his science infographics, manages to pack all the shades of each complex field on one page. For instance, the Map of Mathematics travels from the origins and foundations of the field to the differences between pure mathematics and applied mathematics. Likewise, chemistry is divided between rules and different sub-topics like biochemistry and inorganic chemistry, with fun illustrations to clearly show what falls underneath each area.

    Whether you are a scientist who feels like people never quite get what you do or a student who can't put their finger on how they might use their math or science degree, Walliman's infographics will come in handy. Consider them roadmaps to possible careers or cheat sheets to figuring out how quantum physics is related to the theory of relativity. Best of all, by studying the visual maps, it becomes easy to see how all these scientific fields overlap and fit together like a puzzle."
John Evans

Share it! Science : DIY Zoetrope Animation STEAM Project - 2 views

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    "This DIY zoetrope is the perfect STEAM project for kids who love art, science and engineering. You most likely have all of the supplies you need around the house, or can get them easily and inexpensively.

    Have you ever played with a zoetrope? Zoetropes are simple devices that pre-date film animation. The viewer looks through the slits in a spinning cylinder and sees an animated image."
John Evans

About Kids, Code, and Computer Science: Explore Computer Science and Programming | - 1 views

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    "beanz magazine is a bi-monthly online and print magazine about learning to code, computer science, and how we use technology in our daily lives. The magazine includes hard to find information, for example, a list of 40+ programming languages for education, coding schools, summer tech camps, and more."
John Evans

CurioCity - CurioCité | Why is it so hard to wake up for school? - 1 views

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    "Tell me if this sounds familiar: Your alarm goes off at 7:00 am. It's a school day. It's time to get out of bed and get ready to make that early morning bell. But in that moment, you feel as though there is no force on the planet that could make you open your eyes and surrender your comfortable position under the covers. Your mom comes into the room, already dressed for work. "You know," she says, "you wouldn't be so tired if you'd just gone to bed a little earlier."

    Is she right? Also, why isn't she ever tired in the morning?

    Most teens would agree that they're much sleepier in the morning than their parents are. There's a single molecule that's largely responsible for this difference. And no, it's not caffeine - it's melatonin!"
John Evans

Boston's EMPath Program Uses Science to Fight Family Poverty - The Atlantic - 0 views

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    "You saw the pictures in science class-a profile view of the human brain, sectioned by function. The piece at the very front, right behind where a forehead would be if the brain were actually in someone's head, is the pre-frontal cortex. It handles problem-solving, goal-setting, and task execution. And it works with the limbic system, which is connected and sits closer to the center of the brain. The limbic system processes emotions and triggers emotional responses, in part because of its storage of long-term memory.

    When a person lives in poverty, a growing body of research suggests the limbic system is constantly sending fear and stress messages to the prefrontal cortex, which overloads its ability to solve problems, set goals, and complete tasks in the most efficient ways.

    This happens to everyone at some point, regardless of social class. The overload can be prompted by any number of things, including an overly stressful day at work or a family emergency. People in poverty, however, have the added burden of ever-present stress. They are constantly struggling to make ends meet and often bracing themselves against class bias that adds extra strain or even trauma to their daily lives."
John Evans

Fun STEM for Kids - Science Math Engineering Tech | iGameMom - 1 views

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    STEM resources and activities that can be sorted by age and subject area. Check them out!
John Evans

What the Flu Does to Your Brain, According to a Sick Scientist | Inverse - 0 views

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    "lu checklist: a dozen boxes of tissues, oversized sweatshirt from a college you didn't go to, an orange juice IV, three buckets (one for depositing used tissues, one full of a medley of cough drops and Nyquill, and one for when the medicine comes back up), and a general animosity toward the universe for making you feel like a sack of rotten mayonnaise. Got everything? Good. Here is exactly what's happening in your brain as you fight everyone's favorite seasonal asshole: the flu."
John Evans

All kids should have a computer science education - Baltimore Sun - 0 views

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    "Like most students at the time, I did not have access to computer science classes when I attended Wilde Lake High School in Columbia during the 1980s. I only stumbled upon the field when my high school math teacher recommended that I take a FORTRAN programming course at Howard Community College. I quickly learned that programming was like nothing I had experienced in school before. Whenever I finally solved a problem, there was a deeply satisfying "aha!" moment.

    As a result, I studied computer science at Harvard and received my Ph.D. in the field from the University of California, Berkeley. Nearly four decades after I took that first FORTRAN class, I'm a professor of computer science and associate dean at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

    I was fortunate to have found my passion, even though computer science was not taught at my school. The unfortunate fact is that most K-12 schools still do not teach computer science, and most of today's high school and college students - particularly women - have still had little or no exposure to computational thinking, coding or computer science. There are certainly many students who would make great computer scientists, or who could leverage computing skills to achieve success in any number of other fields, who never take a single related class. Even in Maryland, one of the most technologically advanced states in the nation, only 14 percent of students take a computer science class in high school, and nearly half of the public high schools do not offer any AP computer science classes."
John Evans

Free Technology for Teachers: The Math and Science of Valentine's Day - 1 views

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    "Valentine's Day is less than two weeks away. In middle schools and high schools everywhere there will be students who are excited about it, some who dread it, and others who are indifferent. I always fell into the indifferent category. Wherever your students stand on Valentine's Day, the following two videos make for interesting lessons about Valentine's Day."
John Evans

3 Educational Websites Science Teachers Should Check Out ~ Educational Technology and M... - 0 views

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    "Below are three interesting science resources selected specifically for elementary teachers. These websites provide teachers with a wide variety of educational materials to help young kids enjoy science learning. These include lesson plans, video tutorials, animated explanations, presentations, graphic organizers, interactive games and many more."
John Evans

Creative Computing - An introductory computing curriculum using Scratch - 1 views

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    "Computer science and computing-related fields have long been introduced to young people in a way that is disconnected from their interests and values - emphasizing technical detail over creative potential. Creative computing supports the development of personal connections to computing, by drawing upon creativity, imagination, and interests."
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