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John Evans

An Art Teacher's Guide to Understanding STEAM Education - The Art of Ed - 1 views

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    "To survive in today's world, it's imperative for students to become innovators able to think both critically and creatively.

    Because of this, many schools are looking to STEAM education. If you're unfamiliar, STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts, and Math. STEAM education aims to help students see and use connections between all of these disciplines to become well-rounded.

    However, STEAM didn't always exist. In fact, the arts were never part of the original equation. Read on to see how STEM morphed into STEAM and how to bring these important ideas into your classroom."
John Evans

Design Thinking as a Back to School Activity - Louden Clear in Education - 2 views

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    "I am a procrastinator-to say the least-so as school was quickly approaching, I began to scramble to put together our first few days. I combed Pinterest, retweeted ideas, organized my Pocket with a BTS category. But still nothing stuck out for me. Thankfully, in mid-July I was part of a grant process that included two days of design thinking. My friends and I loved the process so much, that we thought "Why don't we start the school year with design thinking?"

    So we did.

    And it was the best first days I have had in twelve years.  I'm not even exaggerating."
Nigel Coutts

Sharing our Puzzles of Practice - The Learner's Way - 2 views

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    Einstein is often quoted as having said "If I have an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes." Clearly Einstein understood how to attack puzzling problems. As teachers we face a host of puzzles on a daily basis. Every student we teach, thanks to their idiosyncrasies presents a unique puzzle. The interactions between students further complicates things. Our goals for our learners, their learning needs, the demands of the curriculum, pressures from beyond the classroom all result in puzzles for us to manage and to solve.
John Evans

The greatest deficiency in education is our obsession with showcasing deficits. - "Put ... - 1 views

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    "As I wrap up my first month of consulting, I have one overarching takeaway: in every building, in every district, in every city, in every state, there are administrators, teachers, and students who are so passionate about learning that you can feel the positive energy in the room. It's humbling. It's heartwarming. It's inspiring.

    Yet, what I also see are lots of educators and students who frequently second guess themselves, continuously ask for permission to do anything, or who render themselves silent in large groups and appear to have "given up." However, behind closed doors, these are the same educators and students who are overflowing with enthusiasm and have a wealth of knowledge.

    Naturally, I have been doing a lot of thinking about the strikingly similar behaviors both adult educators and student learners demonstrate in our current educational system. What causes passionate learners to become apathetic toward their passion? Why do students and adults alike ask for permission to learn? And, I keep coming back to one simple conclusion.

    THE DEFICIT MODEL OF EDUCATION HAS WORN US ALL DOWN"
John Evans

So, What IS the Future of Work? | EdSurge News - 3 views

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    "For many attending the Future of Work symposium on Wednesday, there wasn't any question whether automation is going to take over jobs-but rather when, and how education should respond.

    Hosted at Stanford University, the day-long event brought together dozens of minds who are thinking about what careers and skills students need to prepare for, and how an increasingly digital higher-education system will need to adapt to help get them there. Speakers including edX CEO Anant Agarwal, associate dean and director of Stanford's Diversity and First-Gen office Dereca Blackmon, and Deborah Quazzo, a co-founder of investment firm GSV, shared their ideas on what that might look like.

    Here are a few major themes we heard throughout the day:"
Nigel Coutts

Good Reads for Great Assessment - The Learner's Way - 3 views

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    Recently I have been diving into the world of Assessment, seeking to better understand how we might design effective processes around this essential phase of the learning cycle. In doing so I have found a wealth of resources and quality reads that offer insights and strategies to be applied into our classrooms. Here then is a sampling of what I have been reading. 
John Evans

Best Education Podcasts 2017 | Edutopia - 4 views

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    "Teachers, psychologists, and authors bring you handy tips and big-picture takes on the state of education in these eight podcasts.
    By Betty Ray"
John Evans

Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming | Books | The... - 0 views

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    "It's important for people to tell you what side they are on and why, and whether they might be biased. A declaration of members' interests, of a sort. So, I am going to be talking to you about reading. I'm going to tell you that libraries are important. I'm going to suggest that reading fiction, that reading for pleasure, is one of the most important things one can do. I'm going to make an impassioned plea for people to understand what libraries and librarians are, and to preserve both of these things."
John Evans

Curiosity Is a Unique Marker of Academic Success - The Atlantic - 1 views

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    "When Orville Wright, of the Wright brothers fame, was told by a friend that he and his brother would always be an example of how far someone can go in life with no special advantages, he emphatically responded, "to say we had no special advantages … the greatest thing in our favor was growing up in a family where there was always much encouragement to intellectual curiosity.""
Nigel Coutts

Maker Education on a Budget - The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    There is growing interest from schools in the Maker Movement and Maker Education but with this have come some subtle misunderstandings about what it is all about. For one the modern maker movement is all about the mindset of the maker rather than developing a set of specific skills for making. The second confusion stems from a belief that the maker movement is all about the tools and the makerspace and that as such it involves large budgets.
John Evans

How To Make Your Kids Smarter: 10 Steps Backed By Science | Time.com - 0 views

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    "I've explored the science behind what makes kids happier, what type of parenting works best and what makes for joyful families.
    But what makes children - from babies up through the teen years - smarter?
    Here are 10 things science says can help:"
Nigel Coutts

Asking Why and Why and Why - The Learner's Way - 2 views

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    As children, we ask "Why?" a lot. It is a part of childhood, that special time when the many forces acting upon our cognitive development converge around a singular desire to ask "Why". It becomes the central focus of our conversational style, an incessant exclamation into the void which tests the patience of any nearby adult. But asking "Why" offers so much more.
John Evans

The Guide to Maker Education - 5 views

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    "What does maker education look like in today's schools - and how can you bring it into yours? To answer these questions, USC Rossier teamed up with edtech expert and teacher advocate Leah Levy to create "The Guide to Maker Education" - every teacher's handbook for bringing the maker movement into their classroom."
Nigel Coutts

Taking risks outside our comfort zone - The Learner's Way - 0 views

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    Possibly the most dangerous place to spend too much time is inside your comfort zone. Only when we take a risk and step away from the safety of the familiar and the ways we have always done things do we expose ourselves to new ideas and become open to the possibility of learning and discovery. The trouble is having the confidence to take that first step, to embrace discomfort and become open to the risks that come with trying something new.
Nigel Coutts

Why such a rapid pace of change? - The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    I am currently reading "Thank you for being late: An optimist's guide to thriving in the age of accelerations" and have found in this the answer to these questions. In essence we are confronting two types of change, one that we have always faced and one that is unique to our current times. 
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