Skip to main content

Home/ ETAP640/ Group items matching "benefits" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Jessica M

Educators: Are Web - based Resources an Effective Means for Increasing Knowledge in Higher Education? - 0 views

  • Previous research has shown that online instruction has aided in the preparation and retention of special education teachers (Dymond & Bentz, 2006; Knapczyk, Frey, & Wall-Marencik, 2005).
    • Jessica M
       
      Online instruction is research proven to help benefit special education students
  • positively affect attitudes, knowledge
  • lack of training during their preservice years in proper interventions for students with disabilities, including modification, accommodations and assistive technology
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • ill-equipped
  • For example teacher educators identify time constraints as one of the biggest barriers in providing an effective overall class on how to educate students with disabilities in the general education classroom
  • outcomes, and perceptions of educating students with disabilities in general education (Carroll, 2003; Cook, 2002; Kirk, 1998; Powers, 1992).
  • Assistive Technology Outcomes and BenefitsFocused Issue: The Role of Higher Education in Preparing Education Professionals to Use AT
  •  
    Many facts about students with disabilities and how educators can benefit from online courses and learning to better support the needs of these students. Benefit of taking this course online - community, sharing..
b malczyk

Benefits of Diversity in Education - 0 views

  • students in classrooms and in the broad campus environment will be more motivated and better able to participate in a heterogeneous and complex society
  • Cognitive growth is fostered when individuals encounter experiences and demands that they cannot completely understand or meet, and thus must work to comprehend and master the new
  • more frequently expressed democratic sentiment
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • greater motivation to take the perspective of others
  • less often evaluated the University’s emphasis on diversity as producing divisiveness between groups
  • enjoyed learning about the experiences and perspectives of other groups more than the control students
  • participants were more interested in politics and also had participated more frequently in campus political activities.
  • The discrepancy that racial and ethnic diversity on college campuses offers students for personal development and preparation for citizenship in an increasingly multicultural society depends on actual experience that students have with diverse peers.
  •  
    This article describes some of the potential benefits of diversity in education. In my post I suggest that online education provides a unique means of increasing diversity which comes with the benefits described in this article.
Gary Bedenharn

Ñandutí >>Benefits of Early Learning - 0 views

  •  
    Benefits of being bilingual
Hedy Lowenheim

How Online Learning Is Revolutionizing K-12 Education and Benefiting Students - 0 views

  • Students appear to be benefiting from online learning programs. While evidence about the effectiveness of K-12 online learning programs is limited, there is reason to believe that students can learn effectively online. In 2009, the U.S. Department of Education published a meta-analysis of evidence-based studies of K-12 and postsecondary online learning programs.[3] The study reported that "students who took all or part of their class online performed better, on average, than those taking the same course through traditional face-to-face instruction."[4] In addition, online learning has the potential to improve productivity and lower the cost of education, reducing the burden on taxpayers
  • Whether students have access to online learning options will largely be determined by policymakers' willingness to reform education funding to facilitate greater parental choice. This factor largely explains why the Florida Virtual School enrolls 154,000 students while the Maryland Virtual School enrolls only 710 students. If policymakers want to open the possibilities of online learning to all students, they must reform school funding mechanisms to allow the money to follow the students to their providers of choice.
  • Federal policymakers should consider using online or virtual learning to improve effectiveness and efficiency of these programs. For example, the Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA) currently educates approximately 85,000 children of military personnel[22] and is developing plans to create an online virtual high school for the 2010-2011 school year.[23] A virtual school for the children of military personnel would likely expand their educational opportunities and minimize disruptions caused by transferring to new schools when their parents are transferred to new assignments.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Online learning has the potential to revolutionize American education. Today, as many as 1 million children are participating in some form of online learning.
  •  
    "How Online Learning Is Revolutionizing K-12 Education and Benefiting Students"
Hedy Lowenheim

kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram - 0 views

  • Despite this, (and this is my personal view, not the view of the 'anti-Learning Styles lobby'), many teachers and educators continue to find value and benefit by using Learning Styles theory in one way or another, and as often applies in such situations, there is likely to be usage which is appropriate, and other usage which is not.
  • Education is big business. Much is at stake commercially and reputationally, and so it is not surprising that debate can become quite fierce as to which methods work and which don't. So try to temper what you read with what you know and feel and experience. Personal local situations can be quite different to highly generalised averages, or national 'statistics'. Often your own experiences are likely to be more useful to you than much of the remote 'research' that you encounter through life. You must be careful how you use systems and methods with others, and be careful how you assess research and what it actually means to you for your own purposes.
  • A note about Learning Styles in young people's education: Towards the end of the first decade of the 2000s a lobby seems to have grown among certain educationalists and educational researchers, which I summarise very briefly as follows: that in terms of substantial large-scale scientific research into young people's education, 'Learning Styles' theories, models, instruments, etc., remain largely unproven methodologies. Moreover Learning Styles objectors and opponents assert that heavy relience upon Learning Styles theory in developing and conducting young people's education, is of questionable benefit, and may in some cases be counter-productive. Despite this, (and this is my personal view, not the view of the 'anti-Learning Styles lobby'), many teachers and educators continue to find value and benefit by using Learning Styles theory in one way or another, and as often applies in such situations, there is likely to be usage which is appropriate, and other usage which is not.
  •  
    "A note about Learning Styles in young people's education, and by implication potentially elsewhere too: I am grateful to the anonymous person who pointed me towards a seemingly growing lobby among educationalists and educational researchers, towards the end of the first decade of the 2000s, which I summarise very briefly as follows: that in terms of substantial large-scale scientific research into young people's education, 'Learning Styles' theories, models, instruments, etc., remain largely unproven methodologies. Moreover, Learning Styles objectors and opponents assert that the use of, and certainly the heavy reliance upon, Learning Styles theory in formulating young people's education strategies, is of questionable benefit, and may in some cases be counter-productive."
ian august

Can YouTube enhance student nurse learning? - 0 views

  • is
  • Constraints
  • Constraint
  • ...20 more annotations...
  • students becoming powerful consumers of education and demanding up-to-date interesting and interactive models of teaching and support.
  • Hall (2010) acknowledges that there are benefits to technological approaches in teaching and learning, but rejects the idea that technology is a “panacea” for the netgen (net generation). Skiba (2007, p.100), however, strongly argues that these emerging technologies “will transform the way nursing education is offered” in the future.
  • Today's students are experienced in digital interaction from an increasingly early age
  • The first benefit to using YouTube in teaching and learning is that it is a recognised tool from the digital environment of the netgen
  • already being used as both an informal and formal learning tool by many
  • it can be accessed anywhere at any time.
  • students can engage with their learning at a time and place to suit them.
  • YouTube as a tool in the classroom can lead to increased engagement in several key ways.
  • keeps students' attention focused. This is especially pertinent in the digital era with the reducing attention span
  • visual methods of delivery is an established method of keeping material ‘memorable’
  • Therefore our students no longer need to trudge to the library and join a waiting list to access a suitable supporting material.
  • Kellner and Kim 2009 Kellner, D., Kim, G., 2009. YouTube, Critical Pedagogy and Media Activism: An Articulation. Accessed online at http://gseis.ucla.edu/faculty/kellner/2009_essays.html.Kellner and Kim (2009) confirm that UTers (YouTube users) who responded to a video either through text comments or video responses showed higher motivation in the discussion.
  • ouTube offers a medium to provide multiple viewpoints to provoke comparison within the lecture environment .
  • YouTube opens the door to find alternative representations of anything you might want to say
  • Freeman and Chapman, 2007 B. Freeman and S. Chapman, Is “YouTube” telling or selling you something? Tobacco content on the YouTube video-sharing website, Tobacco Control 16 (2007), pp. 207–210. Full Text via CrossRef | View Record in Scopus | Cited By in Scopus (27)Freeman and Chapman (2007) point to the risk of YouTube being used as a mode of subversive advertising and report on a wide range of underhand tactics used by tobacco companies to sponsor their products.
  • Kellner and Kim 2009 Kellner, D., Kim, G., 2009. YouTube, Critical Pedagogy and Media Activism: An Articulation. Accessed online at http://gseis.ucla
  • Therefore the role of the lecturer is to stimulate discussion
  • They describe this as the: ‘process of video postings as self education, UTers thus practice the pedagogy of learning-by-doing as “performative pedagogy” that they effectively engage in their everyday lives as a fundamental process of meaning-making’ (Kellner and Kim, 2009, p. 15).
  • Good techniques to use are presenting alternative sides of arguments and allowing discussions about the appropriateness of choices.
  • YouTube is a resource of user-generated content with no quality regulation
  •  
    benefits of using youtube to learn, and some constraints
Michael Lucatorto

Teaching Standardized Courses: Advantages and Disadvantages | Faculty Focus - 0 views

  • Yet there are those who feel “standardized” means “canned” — with no input from the teacher, and no opportunities for instructors to fully leverage their expertise, much less infuse their teaching style into the course.
  • In fact, she says, teaching an online course with some standardized content can carry with it certain instructor benefits, including: Allows you to spend less time preparing your online course Lets you focus your energies on teaching the course Enables you to teach a wider range of courses Gives your course a professional look and feel, with multimedia components that appeal to today’s students
  • Despite the many benefits of standardized courses, however there are some pitfalls that need to be addressed, including the potential for: A poor fit between course design and the instructor’s teaching style, in some cases there may be irreconcilable differences Lack of ownership and engagement Loss of interest after repeating the same content semester after semester Disagreement with aspects of course content
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • “You’ll want to thoroughly familiarize yourself with the course you are going to teach, because if you don’t understand the content, approach, and principles of that course, you will find it hard to be an effective instructor,” Ko says. “Also find out what you can add or change in the course, whether that is your own commentary, additional resources, assignments, or discussion questions. Or it may be that your unique contribution will be in providing feedback and facilitating interaction in the class.”
  •  
    Despite the many benefits of standardized courses, however there are some pitfalls that need to be addressed, including the potential for: A poor fit between course design and the instructor's teaching style, in some cases there may be irreconcilable differences Lack of ownership and engagement Loss of interest after repeating the same content semester after semester Disagreement with aspects of course content
Diane Gusa

Benefits of a Student Self-Grading Model | Faculty Focus - 0 views

  • Edwards sees one final benefit. “My impression is that self-grading alleviates student anxiety and, subsequently, eases student-teacher conflict by demystifying the grading process and making students feel that they have control over their own evaluation.” (p. 75)
Lauren D

Ben_Online.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

  •  
    Students share perspectives Online forums, provide public areas to post information. Each student can view another student's answers and learn through the exposure to different perspectives. This benefits students because they can combine new opinions with their own, and develop a solid foundation for learning. Research supports that "as learners become aware of the variations in interpretation and construction of meaning among a range of people [they] construct an individual meaning, " (Alexander, 1997). Students experience a sense of equality-Another benefit to using web-based communication tools is to give all students a reinforced sense of equality. Each individual has the same opportunity to "speak up" by posting messages without typical distractions such as seating arrangements, volume of student voices, and gender biases. Shy and anxious students feel more comfortable expressing ideas and backing up facts when posting online instead of speaking in a lecture room. Studies prove that online discussions provoke more confrontational and direct communication between students.
Lisa Martin

Benefits of Digital Storytelling - 0 views

  • Digital storytelling enhances not only the students literacy development but also their social-emotional development.
    • Lisa Martin
       
      The more I saw about digital storytelling, the more I realized it's potential for building self esteem. There is no "wrong" answer here. Everyone can be successful.
    • Lisa Martin
       
      As I looked at countless resources for self esteem building activities, I realized that I was lacking a truly collaborative activity in my course. I thought that digital story telling would be a fun, stress-free way for the girls to work together and connect with each other.
  • is that with digital storytelling students may use a real and authentic voice. This is of course very empowering in terms of motivation.
    • Lisa Martin
       
      I love the idea of the girls being able to use their "voice" as soon as possible in my course. I want to use this activity in the first module as another "icebreaking" activity on top of my voicethread.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • but their ability to tell their own story, students with learning difficulties tend to do well with digital storytelling projects.
    • Lisa Martin
       
      I also like that digital storytelling allows for girls of all ability levels to participate. I could really make it a fun activity with the emphasis on the story itself, not their writing abilities.
  • another benefit of digital storytelling, is that students, when given the choice, most often will choose to talk about something they are passionate about; thus creating engagement for the creator of the digital story
    • Lisa Martin
       
      I love that this activity will give students freedom and choice to add anything they want. We all know that giving students choice leads to them being for satisfied :-)
  •  
    As I looked at countless resources for self esteem building activities, I realized that I was lacking a truly collaborative activity in my course. I thought that digital story telling would be a fun, stress-free way for the girls to work together and connect with each other.
b malczyk

Exploring Tangible Benefits of e-Learning - 0 views

  •  
    Great resource on tangible benefits of e-learning
Melissa Pietricola

http://www.uncp.edu/home/dente/online.htm - 0 views

  • Such discussion places many learners at a disadvantage - those who are introverted, those for whom English is not their first language, those who don't like to interrupt, those who like to think more before they speak, and many others
    • Melissa Pietricola
       
      I think this-giving everyone the opportunity to speak is the most significant benefit for my students in having the course by a hybrid
  • only 20% of the students do 80% of the discussing. Online, 65% of the students do 80% of the discussing.
  • Consequently, online students do more work and cover more subject matter.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • This constant interaction with the subject matter greatly increases learning retention.
  • Students are more active and self-directed in their learning.
  • discussion is richer because it is recorded
  • class discussions easily cross week boundaries. It is very common for a discussion which began in the first week of the course to resurface in the fourth week when new learnings shine a fresh perspective on it. This type of dialogue feels much more natural than the fragmented discussions I experienced in the classroom.
  • My experience with teaching online is that it is a different thing. I encourage us all to experiment in both our face-to-face and virtual learning encounters and to share what seems to work and not work.
  •  
    it is a short, easy read, and yet stresses important points we educators all experience
  •  
    benefits of online learning
Francisca Capponi

ScienceDirect - Computers & Education : What makes teachers use technology in the classroom? Exploring the factors affecting facilitation of technology with a Korean sample - 0 views

  •  
    benefits of using technology
Nicole Arduini-Van Hoose

Benefits of Peer Review - 0 views

  •  
    benefits of peer review in writing process
ian august

Review of Weimer, Learning-Centered Teaching - 0 views

  • Chapter two examines the effects of too much teacher control and its adverse effects on student motivation, confidence, and enthusiasm for learning. Students are more likely to become self-regulated learners when some of the conditions of their learning are more in their control. Weimer does not advocate abandoning our professional responsibility and letting students determine course content or whether they will do assignments; instead she recommends that teachers establish parameters within which their students will select options. Increasing the decisions students can make about assignments and activities more fully engages them in the course and its content. Among Weimer’s suggestions are providing a variety of assignments to demonstrate learning the course outcomes (students choose a combination), negotiating policies about class participation, and letting students choose which material the teacher will review in class the period before a major test. 
  • . The function of content in a learner-centered course changes from covering content to using content
  • describes the changed role of the teacher in a learner-centered classroom from sage on stage to guide on the side
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • When the teacher dominates the learning, students take shallow approaches to learning.
  • 1.  Teachers do learning tasks less. Assign to students some of the tasks of organizing the content, giving examples, summarizing discussions, solving problems, and drawing diagrams, charts, and graphs.            2.  Teachers do less telling; students do more discovering. Give a quiz on your syllabus and policies without going over it first. Let students discover information in assigned readings without presenting it first or summarizing it later.  3.  Teachers do more design work. Design activities and assignments that move students to new skill levels, motivate engagement in the course content by doing the work of practitioners in the discipline, and that develop self-awareness of their learning of the content. 4.   Faculty do more modeling. Demonstrate how a skilled learner (the teacher) continues to learn. Show them drafts of your articles, notes on your own reading in professional journals; talk aloud as you solve a problem, thereby revealing  and modeling your thinking process. 5.  Faculty do more to get students learning from and with each other. Create work for small groups to do in class. 6.  Faculty work to create climates for learning. Create a climate that promotes interaction, autonomy, and responsibility (more in chapter five). 7.  Faculty do more with feedback. In addition to assigning grades, use other means of providing frequent feedback (more in chapter six).
  • focuses on student responsibility for learning and how to promote it.
  • transforming passive students into autonomous learners
  • The more structured we make the environment, the more structure students need
  • The more motivation we provide, the less they find within themselves. The more responsibility for learning we try to assume, the less they accept on their own. The more control we exert, the more restive their response. We end up with students who have little commitment to and almost no respect for learning and who cannot function without structure and imposed control. (p. 98)
  • The more we decide for students, the more they expect us to decide.
  • eimer explains several strategies for creating a climate that produces self-regulated intrinsically motivated learners: 
  • The instructor should “make the content relevant, demonstrate its power to answer questions, and otherwise show its apparent intrigue.” Make the student responsible for learning decisions by relying on logical consequences of action and inaction, rather than punishment. For example, to deal with lateness, present important material or assignments early in the period that you do not repeat, rather than deduct attendance points for lateness. Do not summarize chapters if students have not read them. If they arrive unprepared, put the unread material on a test; give frequent tests. Be consistent in administering policies. If your syllabus says late homework is not accepted, never accept late homework despite the heart-wrenching excuse offered by the student. Involve students in a discussion of creating a climate that promotes learning. Have this discussion early in the semester. Weimer’s suggestion for starting the discussion is to have students complete sentence stems such as “In the best class I ever had, teachers . . .” “In the best class I ever had, students . . .” “I learn best when . . .” “I feel most confident as a learner when . . .” (p. 108) Obtain feedback on the classroom climate occasionally and revisit the discussion of policies and procedures. Employ practices that “encourage students to encounter themselves as learners” (p. 111). Explain the purposes and benefits of assignments and projects; tell students what problems they might run into in doing the assignments and suggest remedies. Help them with time management. With group projects, provide guidance in managing the project, handling group dynamics, and assigning individual responsibilities.
  • helps us deal with the fact that almost all students will resist their teacher’s learning-centered approaches. Most of the learner-centered strategies recommended in this book change what students have become accustomed to. Understanding the reasons will help teachers deal with the inevitable student resistance when they present learner-centered practices and policies that withdraw the support students have become dependent upon during their first twelve years of schooling. The good news is that most students see the benefits of learner-centered approaches and benefit from them.
  • , why do students resist it? Based on her research, Weimer lists four reasons: Learner-centered approaches are more work. When the teacher does not summarize the important points in the chapter, the students will have to read it for themselves. When the teacher asks small groups to produce five applications of a concept, rather than supply it in a handout, the students have to do more work. Learner-centered approaches are more threatening. Students who lack confidence in themselves as learners become filled with anxiety at the prospect of becoming responsible for decisions that might be wrong. Students who are not used to questions with no single, authority-approved right answer are fearful of being wrong. Learner-centered approaches involve losses. The strategies recommended in this book are designed to move students to higher stages of self-directedness and higher stages of intellectual development. Moving from one stage to another requires a loss of certainty and the comfort that certainty brings. Learner-centered approaches may be beyond students. Some students’ lack of self-confidence or intellectual immaturity may prevent their accepting responsibility for their own learning.
  • overcome student resistance to learner-centered approache
  • The communication is frequent and explicit The communication encourages and positively reinforces The communication solicits feedback from students The communication resists their resistance.
  • developmental approach to transforming passive dependent learners into self-confident autonomous learners. Learners become self-directed in stages, not in one sin
  • moment of transformatio
Lauren D

Benefits of Peer-Based Learning.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

  •  
    Forums, online communities, and professional networks are these new learning environments, where people find and share information, collaborate and learn on demand. A significant challenge is to motivate people to participate in the knowledge-sharing and learning process. Especially in peer-based learning environments, where learning depends on the effort of all participants, it is essential to provide enough incentives to participate and share information with others." Implementing systems fostering trust through reputation can enhance the learning effectiveness, and provide alternatives for the traditional pedagogical approaches still in place in current e-learning courses. Formal education could profit from such new learning environments adopting these pedagogical approaches and related technical systems."
Jessica M

TEACHING PEER REVIEW AND THE PROCESS OF SCIENTIFIC WRITING | Advances in Physiology Education - 0 views

  • improved grades, much higher quality in the final manuscript,
    • Teresa Dobler
       
      Benefits of peer editing on student work
  • reducing instructor workload
    • Teresa Dobler
       
      Everyone wins! Students learn more, students get more feedback, and professor has less on his or her plate
  • e graded on the quality of their reviews, not on the reviews their papers received
    • Teresa Dobler
       
      So students are held accountable for giving accurate reviews.
  •  
    Benefits of peer editing
Alicia Fernandez

From Andragogy to Heutagogy - 0 views

  •  
    In something of a landmark for education Knowles (1970) suggested an important change in the way in which educational experiences for adults should be designed. The approach, known as andragogy, contrasts quite sharply with pedagogy which is the teaching of children. This paper suggests there is benefit in moving from andragogy towards truly self-determined learning. The concept of truly self-determined learning, called heutagogy, builds on humanistic theory and approaches to learning described in the 1950s. It is suggested that heutagogy is appropriate to the needs of learners in the twenty-first century, particularly in the development of individual capability. A number of implications of heutagogy for higher education and vocational education are discussed.
  •  
    In something of a landmark for education Knowles (1970) suggested an important change in the way in which educational experiences for adults should be designed. The approach, known as andragogy, contrasts quite sharply with pedagogy which is the teaching of children. This paper suggests there is benefit in moving from andragogy towards truly self-determined learning. The concept of truly self-determined learning, called heutagogy, builds on humanistic theory and approaches to learning described in the 1950s. It is suggested that heutagogy is appropriate to the needs of learners in the twenty-first century, particularly in the development of individual capability. A number of implications of heutagogy for higher education and vocational education are discussed.
Jessica M

Enabling Students with Disabilities with Computing Interaction and Empowerment though Enhanced Strategic Instructional Course Design - 0 views

  • or many centuries, education has been focused on the learning of course content, but the learning styles of the students have been ignored .
  • While most of the academic approaches have been centered on the mastery of course content knowledge, not all learners learn in the same way.
  • As a result, different teaching techniques, strategies, and tools may be needed to help all students acquire, understand, and apply learning gained from the course content.
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • visual learners were able to benefit from applications in PowerPoint and Flash Multi-Media technology.
  • students with disabilities are finding technology to be more enabling than disabling at times.
  • us, more students with disabilities are enrolling in online courses. O
  • Auditory learners could benefit from online classrooms with auditory lectures, Podcasts for students, as well as live chats
  •  
    - need to teach students use of technology for future - work place - needs of different type of learners - online classes offer varying opportunities (accommodate different learning styles and strategies) - increase in students with disabilities enrolling in online courses - less barriers for students with disabilities
Teresa Dobler

JOLT - Journal of Online Learning and Teaching - 1 views

  • Student learning ought to be at the heart of any pedagogical strategy or technique, regardless of whether the class is delivered online or in a more traditional classroom setting.
  • there is little doubt that online teaching and learning requires more time in both preparation and delivery; however, the point was previously made that this should not necessarily be the case. Good teaching in traditional classrooms, when done well, also requires a significant amount of time to prepare and deliver. We argue here that both teaching and learning would improve if many of the considerations inherent in the preparation and delivery of online learning were given priority in courses delivered in traditional classrooms.
  • It is hoped that the key issues addressed here will assist faculty in the preparation and delivery of their traditional courses. In summary, the benefits for traditional instruction in statistics through the use of online pedagogy are: 1) Improved ability to know what material is “essential” to the students’ understanding and learning. A focused delivery of traditional pedagogy minimizes student confusion and misunderstandings and leaves time for additional activities that can be used to enhance student learning. 2) Improved ability to logically and consistently organize and deliver course material. The use of weekly modules containing an overview that summarizes the lecture topic and objectives is helpful to both the instructor and the student in organizing course material 3) Improved willingness to seek out and complete training on how to teach in the traditional classroom. While some colleges and universities require training to teach online, few, if any, require training to teach in the classroom. Many colleges and universities provide both individual and group training to instructors who are new to teaching, and the experience of teaching online can enhance an instructor’s desire and ability to be a better teacher in the traditional classroom. 4) Improved ability to create multiple strategies for the submission of student work and clarification of misunderstandings. The experience of teaching online enables instructors to devise varied strategies for the submission of course work, and provides additional arenas for the instructor to clarify misunderstandings in a forum in which all students can participate. 5) Improved ability to use new technologies for the development and delivery of instruction. Knowing what tools are available for course development and delivery can broaden an instructor’s ability to prepare course materials and deliver them in creative, stimulating ways. 6) Improved ability to maintain the course schedule. 7) Improved ability to maintain contact with all students in the course. In traditional classrooms, students can sit quietly for weeks, engaging little, if at all, with the instructor, the material, or their peers. Teaching online exposes instructors to a wide variety of strategies for enhancing student engagement because they must participate. 8) Improved pedagogical versatility. Being proficient teaching in multiple venues increases one’s own instructional flexibility, and also increases the flexibility of a department to deliver instruction to students. 9) Improved student access to the course material during instructor absences. Having the course material created by the instructor available during the instructor’s absence facilitates student learning and helps maintain the course schedule. 10) Improved student learning due to the repetitive availability of course material, including practice problems and solutions. Once voice-over lectures have been created, they can be uploaded to Blackboard for use in any course.
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • The pedagogical and practical benefits of teaching online are identified, and specific suggestions are made for how instructors can use these benefits to improve their traditional classroom pedagogy.
  • If instructors gave as much thought to the construction of their on-campus courses as they do their online courses, all education would be better
    • Teresa Dobler
       
      My experiences building an online course will greatly impact my face-to-face teaching - I spend so much time planning, revising, and improving before I even begin teaching, and I have an end goal in mind.
  • Successful online learning outcomes appear in large part to be due to the care with which the course is designed and delivered.
  • online pedagogy frequently involves consultation and collaboration
    • Teresa Dobler
       
      I wonder why? This is definitely true of my course as a grad student. Is it true elsewhere?
  •  
    online and on campus teaching should both take the same amount of prep
1 - 20 of 115 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page